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  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Moab Man's Avatar

    My first star tracker image.

    My first star tracker image.
    This is my first star tracker image. No, it's not much and nothing spectacular. My first image was to see if I could achieve round stars... and I did it. This is a four minute exposure pointed at Vega. Between now and the twelfth I will keep practicing setting it up from scratch each night. June 12 is when I head out for a week long photography trip and am heading for dark skies. So for right now, round stars are beautiful! The second shot is a 1 inch slice. It's amazing how many stars are there and the weakest were actually lost in a cursory edit.

    My first star tracker image.-w_dsc_0941.jpg
    My first star tracker image.-w_dsc_0941_1inch.jpg


    › See More: My first star tracker image.
    Thanks/Like Hobbit Thanks/liked this post
     
    D5100, D7100, D600, D750, Df
    Lenses: Nikon DX 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 55-300mm, Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD & 200-500mm
    Prime: Nikon 35mm, 50mm, & 85mm f/1.8G, 300mm f/4
    Wide Angle: Tokina AT-X116 Pro DX-II 11-16mm f/2.8, Rokinon f/2.8 14mm (chipped)
    Macro: Nikon 40mm, Tamron 90mm
    ​Flash: Nissin MARK II Di622
    Stuff: Expodisc Neutral & Portrait
    ​Editing: CS6, CC, Nik Tools, Portrait Pro 12, Topaz
    Spyder4Pro
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/



  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    Re: My first star tracker image.

    Looks good, can't wait to see what you do in a dark site.
    Thanks/Like Moab Man Thanks/liked this post
     
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100
    Sigma 150-600mm DG Contemporary, Sigma 50-150mm f2.8, Tamron 28-75mm f2.8,
    Nikkor Nifty-Fifty.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Moab Man's Avatar

    Re: My first star tracker image.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dawg Pics View Post
    Looks good, can't wait to see what you do in a dark site.
    What jumps out at me most is how clean the image is. Not having to shoot at an ISO in the 1000's, but at the base ISO gives such a clean image.

    This image was shot at ISO 400 and was ridiculously overexposed. My subsequent images I dropped down until I found 100 was more than enough. But I wanted to use my very first image from the tracker.
    Last edited by Moab Man; 05-29-2020 at 03:34 AM.
    D5100, D7100, D600, D750, Df
    Lenses: Nikon DX 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 55-300mm, Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD & 200-500mm
    Prime: Nikon 35mm, 50mm, & 85mm f/1.8G, 300mm f/4
    Wide Angle: Tokina AT-X116 Pro DX-II 11-16mm f/2.8, Rokinon f/2.8 14mm (chipped)
    Macro: Nikon 40mm, Tamron 90mm
    ​Flash: Nissin MARK II Di622
    Stuff: Expodisc Neutral & Portrait
    ​Editing: CS6, CC, Nik Tools, Portrait Pro 12, Topaz
    Spyder4Pro
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    Re: My first star tracker image.

    I would love to get a tracker. I am lucky enough to live driving distance from Joshua Tree National Park. There is a quite pricey overnight class there to learn astrophotography. It sells out. I need to be in better shape due to the hiking, though.
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100
    Sigma 150-600mm DG Contemporary, Sigma 50-150mm f2.8, Tamron 28-75mm f2.8,
    Nikkor Nifty-Fifty.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Moab Man's Avatar

    Re: My first star tracker image.

    I'm into it about $1000.

    $350 for a rock solid tripod - and it needs to be rock solid for deep space long focal length
    $350 for the iOptron Skyguider tracker - from my research this seems to be a really solid unit - cost a bit more
    $250 for the iPolar sighting system - this is NEEDED if you are going for the deep space object on a long focal length

    If you wanted, if you have a decent tripod, can really get into it for the $350. However, that configuration is best for wide photography like the Milkyway. When you are shooting 300mm+ the rock solid tripod and a computerized alignment are needed.

    The next step is the post processing. Milkyway and space images are all in the edit. Deep space gets really hard combined with the hours of learning, and I know Photoshop well.

    It really is a daunting task to learn it because good isn't good enough. I want this skill commensurate with my other skills. Sure, I can edit the Milkyway, but deep space nebula... that is a challenge.
    D5100, D7100, D600, D750, Df
    Lenses: Nikon DX 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 55-300mm, Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD & 200-500mm
    Prime: Nikon 35mm, 50mm, & 85mm f/1.8G, 300mm f/4
    Wide Angle: Tokina AT-X116 Pro DX-II 11-16mm f/2.8, Rokinon f/2.8 14mm (chipped)
    Macro: Nikon 40mm, Tamron 90mm
    ​Flash: Nissin MARK II Di622
    Stuff: Expodisc Neutral & Portrait
    ​Editing: CS6, CC, Nik Tools, Portrait Pro 12, Topaz
    Spyder4Pro
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  6. #6
    Staff
    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    Re: My first star tracker image.

    I'm curious which tripod you use. Carbon Fiber is supposed to be better and helps eliminate some vibrations, but it doesn't necessarily mean they are better than a really heavy aluminum tripod - or one that is weighted down well.
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2020 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    Re: My first star tracker image.

    I used to belong to an astronomy forum. There were a few serious astrophotographers on there, and they had lots of money invested in equipment and software. The cost of equipment is the reason I never entertained it as a serious hobby. Back then, I couldn't even afford a decent camera, much less a computer, stacking software, tracker, etc, etc.
    Thanks/Like Moab Man Thanks/liked this post
     
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100
    Sigma 150-600mm DG Contemporary, Sigma 50-150mm f2.8, Tamron 28-75mm f2.8,
    Nikkor Nifty-Fifty.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Moab Man's Avatar

    Re: My first star tracker image.

    Quote Originally Posted by hark View Post
    I'm curious which tripod you use. Carbon Fiber is supposed to be better and helps eliminate some vibrations, but it doesn't necessarily mean they are better than a really heavy aluminum tripod - or one that is weighted down well.
    You hear that said all the time about carbon vs aluminum and it is true. However, if I'm needing carbon to absorb vibration then my tripod is not in the right place to be taking long exposures.
    D5100, D7100, D600, D750, Df
    Lenses: Nikon DX 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 55-300mm, Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD & 200-500mm
    Prime: Nikon 35mm, 50mm, & 85mm f/1.8G, 300mm f/4
    Wide Angle: Tokina AT-X116 Pro DX-II 11-16mm f/2.8, Rokinon f/2.8 14mm (chipped)
    Macro: Nikon 40mm, Tamron 90mm
    ​Flash: Nissin MARK II Di622
    Stuff: Expodisc Neutral & Portrait
    ​Editing: CS6, CC, Nik Tools, Portrait Pro 12, Topaz
    Spyder4Pro
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Hobbit's Avatar

    Re: My first star tracker image.

    i use my cheap and cheerful SLT goto and a 80mm wide field scope with my camera attached, the mount and scope owes me £160
    i also have a motorised CG4 EQ mount , but for some reason i cannot get it work properly , greased , re greased, backlash set, re set , Dec motor removed and so on but it will not play

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Whiskeyman's Avatar

    Re: My first star tracker image.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dawg Pics View Post
    I used to belong to an astronomy forum. There were a few serious astrophotographers on there, and they had lots of money invested in equipment and software. The cost of equipment is the reason I never entertained it as a serious hobby. Back then, I couldn't even afford a decent camera, much less a computer, stacking software, tracker, etc, etc.
    I am acquainted with several members of the local astronomy club here, and I have to say that they give photographers a go, and often eclipse them (ha-ha), on how much they spend on equipment.

    WM
    Thanks/Like Dawg Pics Thanks/liked this post
     
    “If you want to be a better photographer, stand in front of more interesting stuff.” - Jim Richardson





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