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  1. #1
    Junior Member

    Should I shoot JPG or RAW?

    I'm a wedding photographer with over 30 years experience, previously shooting with the Nikon 801, then Nikon F100. The few weddings I've shot with my D7200, I've only shot JPG, and the results have been incredible. Only a handful need any editing, which means my time on the computer is negligible. The images my clients get are basically straight out of the camera. 6000 x 4000 Hi Res. They have all been thrilled with the quality they get.


    However, a few colleagues have told me this is not very professional, and I should only shoot RAW. But this would mean spending countless hours in front of the computer, and I very much doubt my clients would see any difference.


    In my pastime, I shoot landscapes for myself. Also in JPG. And once again, very little editing.


    Does any pro shoot JPG? How would shooting RAW files make a difference to my business? Would shooting RAW give me better landscape images after editing?


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  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Re: Should I shoot JPG or RAW?

    If you're getting great results with JPG then you might not need to spend "countless hours in front of the computer" because it sounds like you're nailing your shots. The advantage to shooting Raw is that if you don't nail something you have more options.

    What you would most likely do is to create a set of settings that translate your Raw files to what you're getting from your JPEGs. I use Lightroom to import and catalog my stuff, and I apply certain defaults to my Raw files on import. For you this may be as simply as applying the Camera profile that matches what you're shooting with and then set your sharpening and denoise adjustments. Once you have that you can then save it and apply it on import to all your images. It should leave you with no more work than what you have now in terms of editing. You'd just have to do a batch export to JPEG for your customer. And like I said, it will allow you to save some images that you might have missed.
    Thanks/Like hark, Clickr Thanks/liked this post
     
    Jake
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  3. #3
    Staff
    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    Re: Should I shoot JPG or RAW?

    I've always heard many wedding photographers shoot jpeg simply because of the high number of images involved. But if you are shooting an outdoor wedding at high noon without the ability to use flash, then I'd consider shooting RAW. You asked whether shooting RAW for landscapes would be better. In a nutshell - yes for both of these scenarios. The reason is during bright outdoor scenes, the sensor might not be able to capture all the brights and darks in images that we can see with our eyes. A camera sensor doesn't have quite the dynamic range that the human eye has. And that's where editing in RAW has its advantages.

    What this means is if you shoot jpeg for an outdoor wedding where you can't use flash (or if you are shooting landscapes), you might very well blow out your highlights if you are exposing for the people. RAW has the ability to bring back detail within overexposed highlights than what jpeg offers. The same goes with shadowed areas: if you expose for the highlights, the people might very well be underexposed. RAW can bring back details in underexposed areas better than jpegs.

    One way around blown skies is using a graduated neutral density filter such as the ones Cokin or Lee offer especially if shooting jpeg. Years ago I worked for a portrait/sports/wedding studio. Only the owner and one person did the weddings. When I saw images taken along the Delaware River, the sky was blown out in every photo. When I asked why they didn't use a graduated neutral density filter, one of the employees asked why I was suggesting it. The scenery was beautiful, but the sky was completely blown out.

    For your weddings, I agree with Jake. If you are exposing properly in camera with consistent results and taking a high number of images, then stick with jpeg. Not sure if you have to take low light images without flash - that would be an exception as details within shadows are better recovered when shooting RAW.
    Thanks/Like Clickr, Zev Thanks/liked this post
     
    Cindy - D750, D500, D7200
    My 2021 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  4. #4
    Senior Member

    Re: Should I shoot JPG or RAW?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zev View Post
    Does any pro shoot JPG?
    Yes. My sister has been a professional portrait photographer for a long time and shoots JPG. If you and your clients are happy it sounds like you're doing fine. Shooting landscapes in RAW may be beneficial for reasons already mentioned.
    Last edited by Andy W; 02-18-2021 at 06:14 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member

    Re: Should I shoot JPG or RAW?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zev View Post
    Does any pro shoot JPG?
    Anyone doing news photography or events where everything is going to get sent to an editor at the end of the event will shoot JPEG.

  6. #6
    Junior Member

    Re: Should I shoot JPG or RAW?

    Thanks for that. Yes, shooting 400+ images at a wedding is a huge amount of computer work if shooting RAW. (Love the olden days when I just dropped off the film at the lab and they did all the work) And except for indoor shots or bad lighting situations, I always use a polarising filter. Makes a huge difference to the sky, reflections, and any scenes with water. Possible the reason I have never experienced blown out sky.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    BF Hammer's Avatar

    Re: Should I shoot JPG or RAW?

    Yeah, if something isn't broken, don't work too hard at fixing it.

    But something to consider is to try Raw+Jpeg as an option. Both formats are saved to the cards. When you take a shot that might need some rescue adjustments in post, the Raw file is there to work with.
    Thanks/Like BeegRhob Thanks/liked this post
     

  8. #8
    Senior Member

    Re: Should I shoot JPG or RAW?

    Should I shoot JPG or RAW?
    RAW

    Should I shoot JPG or RAW?-dsc_4368.jpg


    JPEG

    Should I shoot JPG or RAW?-dsc_4368-2.jpg


    The Raw version is much grainier. How would I fix that, I shoot Raw + Jpeg. but would like to know how to get rid of the grainy-ness on the RAW version. Its most noticable in low light images for me. Thanks!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Bikerbrent's Avatar

    Re: Should I shoot JPG or RAW?

    However, the Raw version has more detail in the fireplace mantel. Personally, I like the raw version better.
    Thanks/Like MrsRobs Thanks/liked this post
     
    Brent: Poway, CA
    D7200, D200, F100
    Tokina 12-24mm
    Nikon 18-200mm
    Tokina 28-70mm f2.6-2.8
    Nikon 80-200mm f2.8
    Sigma 150-600mm
    Nikon 50 AF f1.8
    Tokina 100mm f2.8 Macro
    Nikon SB800

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    nikonpup's Avatar

    Re: Should I shoot JPG or RAW?

    Quote Originally Posted by MrsRobs View Post
    RAW

    Should I shoot JPG or RAW?-dsc_4368.jpg


    JPEG

    Should I shoot JPG or RAW?-dsc_4368-2.jpg


    The Raw version is much grainier. How would I fix that, I shoot Raw + Jpeg. but would like to know how to get rid of the grainy-ness on the RAW version. Its most noticable in low light images for me. Thanks!
    €‹€‹€‹You can try software for noise reduction. Topaz Denoise has been mentioned as very good.
    Thanks/Like MrsRobs Thanks/liked this post
     

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/pups_pleasure/






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