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  1. #1
    Senior Member

    Question 67mm filter on a 77mm lens

    I have two filters, a 67mm ND and a 67mm Polariser. I have two adapter rings to use on two of my lenses, the problem is one lens has a 77mm filter size. Is it feasible to use an adapter ring to use the 67mm filters on a 77mm lens? This would save my buying 77mm filters. Is it really worth putting an ND or Polariser filter on a 10-20mm wide angle lens?

    Thanks

    Brian


    › See More: 67mm filter on a 77mm lens
    Last edited by meddyliol; 05-05-2020 at 11:09 AM. Reason: Added text
    Nikon D7000, Nikon F75
    Hoya NDx400 filter plus UV filters for all lens
    AF-S Nikkor 55-300mm 1:4.5 -5.6
    Tamron SP AF 60mm f2 Di-II LD (IF)
    Sigma 10-20mm f4-5.6 EX DC HSM
    Neewer 750II TTL Flash Speedlite




  2. #2
    Senior Member
    480sparky's Avatar

    Re: 67mm filter on a 77mm lens

    If you're going to have blue skies in your shot, a polarizer on such a wide lens is going to show part of the sky much much darker than the rest.

    And if you're dropping down from 77 to 67mm, you may well end up vignetting either filter.
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  3. #3
    Staff
    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    Re: 67mm filter on a 77mm lens

    If you put an adapter ring on your lens, you will want to get a step up ring, not a step down ring. A step up ring means the filter is smaller than the diameter of the lens. A step down ring means the filter is larger than the lens. It's better to buy filters in the largest size you might need and buy step down rings to accommodate smaller diameter lenses.

    As Sparky mentioned, it will probably cause vignetting. I tried using a CP filter on my wide angle zoom - full frame body with 18mm lens. It didn't work well. A CP filter (circular polarizer) will alter the color of the sky only when you are facing a certain direction to the sun. And while that sounds good, the problem is the view from a wide angle lens is greater than the area of the sky that gets changed in color. So part of the sky is dark while other parts are light. It makes the sky look kind of splotchy.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member

    Re: 67mm filter on a 77mm lens

    Thanks a lot. Is it worth getting a 10 stop ND filter for my 10-20mm lens? Also, I am sure that I read somewhere that ND filters can be used to 'eliminate' people etc from a picture. I really cannot get my head around that. Why do they 'disappear'?

    Thanks

    Brian
    Nikon D7000, Nikon F75
    Hoya NDx400 filter plus UV filters for all lens
    AF-S Nikkor 55-300mm 1:4.5 -5.6
    Tamron SP AF 60mm f2 Di-II LD (IF)
    Sigma 10-20mm f4-5.6 EX DC HSM
    Neewer 750II TTL Flash Speedlite


  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Horoscope Fish's Avatar

    Re: 67mm filter on a 77mm lens

    Quote Originally Posted by meddyliol View Post
    Thanks a lot. Is it worth getting a 10 stop ND filter for my 10-20mm lens? Also, I am sure that I read somewhere that ND filters can be used to 'eliminate' people etc from a picture. I really cannot get my head around that. Why do they 'disappear'?

    Thanks

    Brian
    Technically speaking they don't. What you read could have been a couple different things but most likely what they were saying is with a long enough exposure, say, 1 minute in duration, something like a person casually walking through the frame would not be in the frame long enough to be visible in the final shot. Now if a person were to verrry slowly walk through your frame during that one-minute exposure, maybe stopping and freezing in place for a few seconds while they did so, you could get some "ghosting" of the person in the final shot which could be used for creative effect.

    You might have come across another technique, called Median Stacking, that's commonly used to remove crowds of people from places like landmarks and what not, but that requires multiple exposures in lieu of a ND filter; though I guess you could use them in conjunction with one another.
    Last edited by Horoscope Fish; 05-07-2020 at 02:40 PM.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member

    Re: 67mm filter on a 77mm lens

    Thanks for that, it explains a lot, that 'ghosting' effect looks interesting though. I still don't know if it's worth getting a 77mm ND filter, maybe investing in Cokin P filters and some adapter rings would be the best bet.

    Brian
    Nikon D7000, Nikon F75
    Hoya NDx400 filter plus UV filters for all lens
    AF-S Nikkor 55-300mm 1:4.5 -5.6
    Tamron SP AF 60mm f2 Di-II LD (IF)
    Sigma 10-20mm f4-5.6 EX DC HSM
    Neewer 750II TTL Flash Speedlite


  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Horoscope Fish's Avatar

    Re: 67mm filter on a 77mm lens

    Quote Originally Posted by meddyliol View Post
    Thanks for that, it explains a lot, that 'ghosting' effect looks interesting though. I still don't know if it's worth getting a 77mm ND filter, maybe investing in Cokin P filters and some adapter rings would be the best bet.

    Brian
    Depends on how often you think you'll need it. If you do, or anticipate doing a lot of long-exposure photography you're probably going to want one. I have a few ND's but the more extreme they are the less I tend to need them. I use a ND8 (3 stop) rather frequently, the ND1000 (ten stop) not so much. Step Rings are handy, and a definite money-saver, but I also find them mildly annoying. Like most things photography related, it's a bit of juggling act.
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    Godox Flashes & Triggers, Manfrotto X055PROB, 3-Legged Thing Airhed II... All Stuffed into a Manfrotto Pro Backpack 50
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