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  1. #1
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    hark's Avatar

    Photographing Computer Monitors

    I am working a project for church and am looking for information. My pastor is retiring, and I've asked church members to submit digital images and/or prints to be used in a book covering the church's history during my pastor's time here. The problem is many people don't know how to submit a decent digital image. Some of the ones I've received are small and pixelated.

    They don't look too bad in a small size on my monitor, but when trying to upsize them, the files aren't that great (using On1 Resize 10). So I am trying to photograph the images my monitor but am running into an issue. There are vertical lines showing up which probably has to do with some type of flicker rate of my monitor.

    What shutter speed works best to avoid those lines? I'm having trouble finding the info when searching online. I'm not knowledgeable about flicker rates of monitors so any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!


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  2. #2
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    Don Kuykendall's Avatar

    Re: Photographing Computer Monitors

    Quote Originally Posted by hark View Post
    I am working a project for church and am looking for information. My pastor is retiring, and I've asked church members to submit digital images and/or prints to be used in a book covering the church's history during my pastor's time here. The problem is many people don't know how to submit a decent digital image. Some of the ones I've received are small and pixelated.

    They don't look too bad in a small size on my monitor, but when trying to upsize them, the files aren't that great (using On1 Resize 10). So I am trying to photograph the images my monitor but am running into an issue. There are vertical lines showing up which probably has to do with some type of flicker rate of my monitor.

    What shutter speed works best to avoid those lines? I'm having trouble finding the info when searching online. I'm not knowledgeable about flicker rates of monitors so any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
    Below 1/50 sec


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  3. #3
    Senior Member

    Re: Photographing Computer Monitors

    I have a feeling the shutter speed that works best will vary with the monitor and the lines might come and go at various speeds. I can't take a picture of my laptop screen without it looking like a canvas print when I zoom in. Every pixel is very apparent.

    Would a screen shot help you out? Windows Print Screen key, then paste into PS. Not sure what key it would be on a mac.

    edit... maybe not. Print screen probably won't grab any extra pixels even if you happen to viewing on a nice big monitor.
    Last edited by nickt; 05-02-2018 at 03:13 PM.
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  4. #4
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    hark's Avatar

    Re: Photographing Computer Monitors

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kuykendall View Post
    Below 1/50 sec


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Thanks. I will give it a try.

    Quote Originally Posted by nickt View Post
    I have a feeling the shutter speed that works best will vary with the monitor and the lines might come and go at various speeds. I can't take a picture of my laptop screen without it looking like a canvas print when I zoom in. Every pixel is very apparent.

    Would a screen shot help you out? Windows Print Screen key, then paste into PS. Not sure what key it would be on a mac.

    edit... maybe not. Print screen probably won't grab any extra pixels even if you happen to viewing on a nice big monitor.
    I need files that can be printed, and screen shots tend to be low res. Unless there is a way to obtain a screen shot with a higher resolution. The end files probably wouldn't need to be printed any larger than 5x7 with a resolution of 300.
    Cindy
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    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  5. #5
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    aroy's Avatar

    Re: Photographing Computer Monitors

    If the images are low res to begin with, taking screen shots will not help, especially if they are less than HD resolution - 1.9K x 1K.

    Just check the size of submitted images. If they are even 2MP, you will get reasonable prints at 200 DPI. 5x7 at 300 DPI is 1500 x 2100 about 3MP, so any thing larger will not be useful at these print sizes.

    One work around, will be to collect the original prints, and use your DSLR to take RAW images of the prints. You will get much better resolution that way. I have used my D3300 to convert hundreds of my older 3x5 prints to 24MP RAW images and then processed them to get beautiful prints. If you install DigicamControl, you can shoot tethered, so that you will be able to fine tune each image's focus and lighting (glare and shadows included).
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  6. #6
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    hark's Avatar

    Re: Photographing Computer Monitors

    Quote Originally Posted by aroy View Post
    One work around, will be to collect the original prints, and use your DSLR to take RAW images of the prints. You will get much better resolution that way. I have used my D3300 to convert hundreds of my older 3x5 prints to 24MP RAW images and then processed them to get beautiful prints. If you install DigicamControl, you can shoot tethered, so that you will be able to fine tune each image's focus and lighting (glare and shadows included).
    I am using my DSLR to take RAW shots of prints, but the problem is some people are submitting very low res digital images. And they don't understand the concept of low res images. I've never shot tethered so thanks for the info.
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2020 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  7. #7
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    Marcel's Avatar

    Re: Photographing Computer Monitors

    Why don't you use screen capture?
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  8. #8
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    hark's Avatar

    Re: Photographing Computer Monitors

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel View Post
    Why don't you use screen capture?
    I am making a book to commemorate my Pastor's years serving the church. It will also incorporate the history of the church during that time. So I need printable images. Taking a screen capture of an already low res image won't allow a lot of latitude for editing because of the upsizing involved to make them printable. Taking images of small files will give me a larger file to start with.
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2020 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  9. #9
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    480sparky's Avatar

    Re: Photographing Computer Monitors

    Using a 50mp in raw won't give you more resolution. A huge file size doesn't mean you can print a 80 x 100 print.

    If the image is being displayed on the monitor, it exists as a file somewhere. That file will have all the resolution in it. The monitor may not be using all that data in the file to display the image. Locate where the file is, and you'll have the highest-resolution image right there.
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  10. #10
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    hark's Avatar

    Re: Photographing Computer Monitors

    Quote Originally Posted by 480sparky View Post
    Using a 50mp in raw won't give you more resolution. A huge file size doesn't mean you can print a 80 x 100 print.

    If the image is being displayed on the monitor, it exists as a file somewhere. That file will have all the resolution in it. The monitor may not be using all that data in the file to display the image. Locate where the file is, and you'll have the highest-resolution image right there.
    I want to display the small digital image on my monitor then photograph it shooting RAW. That way the new file will be a larger size without me having to upsize the original file. The original file is only @3.7" x 2.5" with a resolution of 120dpi. When I take a photo of it shooting RAW, it should become @19x13 with 300dpi. Then since I only want to print it @4x6, it should turn out better than upsizing the original.
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2020 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci







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