+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31
  1. #1
    Junior Member

    Night Photography / Milky Way Shots

    Greetings fellow Nikon users!

    I recently purchased an iOptron SkyTracker in hopes of doing some nifty dark sky photography. Not star trails, but some milky way type shots and possibly some deep space stuff.

    The SkyTracker will allow me to 'follow my target' without getting the trails normally associated with leaving the shutter open for long periods at night.

    I am using a D90 with the 18-70mm kit lens off my old D70.

    Can anyone help me with what settings I should be using on my camera to get the best possible milky way type shots? Any suggestions will be GREATLY appreciated!


    › See More: Night Photography / Milky Way Shots



  2. #2
    RIP :(
    Don Kuykendall's Avatar

    Re: Night Photography / Milky Way Shots

    Welcome to the forum

    If you fill out your profile we can better answer any questions that you might have.
    You can do that at http://nikonites.com/profile.php?do=editprofile

    Some useful links
    Nikon Product Manuals available for download
    Nikon | Imaging Products | Digitutor


    Thanks

    ================================================== ============================
    D750***D7100***24-120 f/4 ***70-300***Tamron 150-600***Tokina 16-28 f2.8***50mm f/1.8***Photoshop/Lightroom CC

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    WhiteLight's Avatar

    Re: Night Photography / Milky Way Shots

    There are some great shots around in the forum.
    Use the search feature, get to know the members better and you'll get over educated pretty soon

    but that looks really cool.. can you give extra information on how it works and stuff??

  4. #4
    Junior Member

    Re: Night Photography / Milky Way Shots

    So I've been reading a little and I've concluded that I should set my ISO as high as possible and f-stop and low as possible... Right?

    And I read somewhere to turn off 'Auto ISO' and something about turning off 'White Balance'?

    WhiteLight - The iOptron SkyTracker basically tracks the sky at the same speed the Earth spins. So I can leave my shutter open for longer without getting star trails.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Whiskeyman's Avatar

    Re: Night Photography / Milky Way Shots

    There is no need to set your ISO as high as possible. I'd start by setting the ISO at its lowest setting w/o getting into a Lo setting. This should give you the least amount of ISO noise in your photo. You can experiment by increasing your ISO, though. However, increased time of exposure will increase noise levels in your photo. Do turn Auto ISO off.


    Your lens should have an optimum aperture setting, which is usually a stop or two down from the maximum aperture. This aperture will give you the optimum optics for your lens, therefore the optimum image on your sensor. So stop your lens down a bit, but don't fear changing it either.


    For White Balance, I prefer setting it to a cooler color temperature. These settings should give you a bluer or whiter star field, as apposed to a warmer color temperature setting giving a red/orange cast.

    Experiment, by getting close and then change settings one at a time.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by Whiskeyman; 05-30-2013 at 04:44 AM.
    “If you want to be a better photographer, stand in front of more interesting stuff.” - Jim Richardson

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    WhiteLight's Avatar

    Re: Night Photography / Milky Way Shots

    Sorry, but i don't agree Whiskeyman..
    Keeping a low ISO may keep the noise out, but it keeps the light out too...
    Since you are shooting stars, most of which are invisible to the naked eye, the camera sensor needs more 'bees' to collect the 'honey' so as to speak.
    So a fail proof setting to get you kicked off-

    Keep the ISO at the highest level you are comfortable with (800-4000)
    The Aperture needs to be at the biggest value like 2.8 or 3.5 or whatever is possible with your lens.
    Shutter speed ideally should be between 15-30 secs... anything more you would get star trails
    Use the widest lens available, on your 18-70 at 18mm
    You'll defy need a tripod & a remote release if available

    If your lens has a focussing ring, focus it just beyond infinity or focus manually on a bright star in the sky & lock it

    Dont be afraid to experiment... so what if your pic is washed out or fully dark, it's just a digital print.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    STM's Avatar

    Re: Night Photography / Milky Way Shots

    Out of curiosity, does anyone know if digital sensors suffer from reciprocity effect during very long exposures like film does?
    Nikon FTn, F2A/MD-2, Nikkormat FT2, F4E, D850, D500, D700

    8-15mm f/3.5-4.5 AFS, 15mm f/3.5 AIS, 16mm f/2.8 Fisheye AIS, 18mm f/3.5 AIS, 24mm f/2.8 AIS, 24mm f/2 AIS, 25-50mm f/4 AIS, 28mm f/2.8 AIS, 35mm f/2 AIS, 35-70mm /3.5 AIS, 50mm f/1.8 AIS, 50mm f/1.4 AIS, 50-135mm f/3.5 AIS, 55mm f/2.8 AIS Micro, 85mm f/1.4 AIS ,135mm f/2 AIS, 80-200 f/4 AIS, 105mm f/1.8 AIS, 105mm 2.8 AIS Micro, 180mm f/2.8 ED AIS, 200mm f/2 ED-IF AIS, 300mm f/2.8 ED-IF AIS, 500mm f/8 Reflex Nikkor, 600mm f/4 ED-IF AIS

  8. #8
    The Dude
    Dave_W's Avatar

    Re: Night Photography / Milky Way Shots

    Quote Originally Posted by STM View Post
    Out of curiosity, does anyone know if digital sensors suffer from reciprocity effect during very long exposures like film does?
    No, they do not but heat noise kills extra long exposures.
    Thanks/Like Whiskeyman Thanks/liked this post
     

    "i wanna live with a Cinnamon girl
    i could be happy
    the rest of my life
    with a Cinnamon girl...."

    AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED; AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5G IF-ED; AF-S NIKKOR 24-70mm f/2.8G ED; AF-S NIKKOR 28mm f/1.8G; AF-S NIKKOR 70-200mm f/2.8G ED VRII; AF-S NIKKOR 85mm f/1.8G; AF-S Micro-NIKKOR 105mm f/2.8G IF-ED VRII; AF-S NIKKOR 300mm f/2.8G ED VRII;

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Whiskeyman's Avatar

    Re: Night Photography / Milky Way Shots

    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteLight View Post
    Sorry, but i don't agree Whiskeyman..
    No need for that. Your opinion is just as worthy as mine here. I was primarily trying to address his specific questions, so I didn't include a lot of the items you did, like using a tripod and a remote release and setting the focus , which are absolutely necessary.

    I will ask you to go back to his original post and pay attention to the sky tracker he is utilizing in reference to your shutter speed advice. They shouldn't need to worry about star trails if his camera is placed on this equipment. They still need to limit exposure times, as you suggest, to reduce noise.

    However, when I work with the local astronomy club, using cameras mounted on clock drive mounts, I hardly ever use an ISO above 400 and always stop the lens aperture down to reduce spherical aberrations. If needed, multiple exposures can be taken if the camera is capable of that. With my D90, I just don't like the results when using an ISO setting of over 800.
    Thanks/Like WhiteLight Thanks/liked this post
     
    “If you want to be a better photographer, stand in front of more interesting stuff.” - Jim Richardson

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Whiskeyman's Avatar

    Re: Night Photography / Milky Way Shots

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_W View Post
    No, they do not but heat noise kills extra long exposures.
    ++

    Hence, the use of image stacking to create long star trails.
    Thanks/Like Dave_W Thanks/liked this post
     
    “If you want to be a better photographer, stand in front of more interesting stuff.” - Jim Richardson





Quick Reply Quick Reply

If you are already a member, please login above before posting.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •