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  1. #51
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    Re: Newbie's question

    You can use a flashlight or laser pointer. This article talks about that-linked below. I think a laser pointer would be really good. Then you can mark your lens with some gaffer tape or something or just use it to focus every time you are in dim light.

    I went back and read your post. I think the conditions you were trying to practice in were just not good. Twinkling faint stars and trees, and it is possible that the D3500 Live View might not be able to focus on faint stars. Use the viewfinder if that is the case.

    I don't know if real time exposure is possible on the D3500, maybe there is something in the manual that will tell you if it does. Also, there is a 'tripod mode' selection in the menus that enables a moveable focus point on your Live View Screen, I think.

    You might see if there is a local camera club. They love beginners, and they go on photo excursions and have lectures and workshops. Some hands-on help might keep you from getting overwhelmed.

    https://photographylife.com/landscap...ar-photography


    › See More: Newbie's question
    Last edited by Dawg Pics; 12-22-2019 at 07:02 AM.
    Thanks/Like blackstar Thanks/liked this post
     
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100



  2. #52
    Senior Member

    Re: Newbie's question

    Ok, I checked up the article from the link you provide. Actually, I was trying to practice by method 4 (focus bright star) and it's obvious that there was no bright star for me to focus, thus I failed. And actually, method 3 (use flashlight) is the general (not specific) version of hyperfocal distance focus. The focus distance being mentioned (about 7.5 m) is actually considered as the hyperfocal distance, but it changes specifically with different lenses (different camera models, lenses, apertures and focal lengths), e.g., my d3500, 18mm, f3.5 has a hyperfocal distance of 4.66m If I focus an object 4.66m far away, I should have behind depth of infinity and front depth to be 2.33m (half of the hyperfocal distance). If I focus an object < 4.66m, behind depth won't reach infinity and if I focus > 4.66m, still get behind depth to infinity, but front depth would be reduced. So far, as I understand, this seems to be the best method for me, but it is all theoretical and I will need practicing (in a good time and place) to find out how and whether it works.

    I very much appreciate if you try this and let me know. I just got an app from photopills it provides many astrophotography info including hyperfocal table, night ar, meteor showers, star trails, spot stars... If you like to know your camera's hyperfocal distance, I can check it out for you (tell me your camera model and focal length, aperture you use), or you can purchase the app (it called photopills.app) for $10.

    Thanks again.

  3. #53
    Senior Member
    Moab Man's Avatar

    Re: Newbie's question

    Newbie's question
    I sensed @hark summoning me and here I am. @blackstar I am more than happy to help.

    Here are a few images, and although I don't remember all the settings, each one was shot at f/2.8.


    Focus for this image was on the tent and people and I was about 40-50 feet away. At this distance everything falls into focus - hyperfocus.

    Newbie's question-wyoming.jpg


    This one was focused on Venus. Venus is so bright that a camera can usually focus on it. However, if it can't, go to live view and manual focus. Super magnify the back of the camera live image on a bright star in the night sky. Turn your focus ring, that is in manual focus, back and forth until that image is the tightest sharpest you can get it. You're now in focus for the night sky and anything in the distance.
    Newbie's question-venus.jpg


    This shot was set up in the daytime with my focus set in the distance on the red rock formations. I then sat for the next 10 hours to capture the lightning, Milkyway, and the formations below.
    Newbie's question-w_d85_5906_v4finished.jpg


    If there is anything else I can help with feel free to ask and mention me. I will now return to my bottle.
    Thanks/Like hark, Needa, blackstar Thanks/liked this post
    Best Answers hark voted best answer for this post
     
    D5100, D7100, D600, D750, Df
    Lenses: Nikon DX 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 55-300mm, Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD & 200-500mm
    Prime: Nikon 35mm, 50mm, & 85mm f/1.8G, 300mm f/4
    Wide Angle: Tokina AT-X116 Pro DX-II 11-16mm f/2.8, Rokinon f/2.8 14mm (chipped)
    Macro: Nikon 40mm, Tamron 90mm
    ​Flash: Nissin MARK II Di622
    Stuff: Expodisc Neutral & Portrait
    ​Editing: CS6, CC, Nik Tools, Portrait Pro 12, Topaz
    Spyder4Pro
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  4. #54
    Staff
    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    Re: Newbie's question

    Newbie's question
    Quote Originally Posted by Moab Man View Post
    I sensed @hark summoning me and here I am. @blackstar I am more than happy to help.

    Here are a few images, and although I don't remember all the settings, each one was shot at f/2.8.


    Focus for this image was on the tent and people and I was about 40-50 feet away. At this distance everything falls into focus - hyperfocus.

    Newbie's question-wyoming.jpg


    This one was focused on Venus. Venus is so bright that a camera can usually focus on it. However, if it can't, go to live view and manual focus. Super magnify the back of the camera live image on a bright star in the night sky. Turn your focus ring, that is in manual focus, back and forth until that image is the tightest sharpest you can get it. You're now in focus for the night sky and anything in the distance.
    Newbie's question-venus.jpg


    This shot was set up in the daytime with my focus set in the distance on the red rock formations. I then sat for the next 10 hours to capture the lightning, Milkyway, and the formations below.
    Newbie's question-w_d85_5906_v4finished.jpg


    If there is anything else I can help with feel free to ask and mention me. I will now return to my bottle.
    Stunning images, George. Thank you so much for this information! No doubt blackstar will be able to use the info.

    Since it's that holiday time of year, I hope you aren't returning to a bottle of Pepto Bismol! Thanks again, and Merry Christmas/Happy Holiday to you and yours, Moab Man!
    Thanks/Like blackstar, Moab Man Thanks/liked this post
     
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2020 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  5. #55
    Senior Member

    Re: Newbie's question

    Thank you so much for the info, Moab. (And thank Cindy for the connection)

    I still have many questions about the topic of astrophotography. Right now, let me ask a few simple and dumb ones:

    1. When you took those striking shots of the milky way, could you clearly see the milky way with your bare eyes at the scene or just the bright twinkling stars?

    2. What's the camera and lens you used for those night-sky shots, especially ones with the milky way? I heard (or read) that only full-frame lenses can catch the milky way (and stars), and other lenses would only catch stars without the milky way. Is this true?

    Thanks for the help and Happy Holiday to you and your family!

  6. #56
    Staff
    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    Re: Newbie's question

    Quote Originally Posted by blackstar View Post
    Thank you so much for the info, Moab. (And thank Cindy for the connection)

    I still have many questions about the topic of astrophotography. Right now, let me ask a few simple and dumb ones:

    1. When you took those striking shots of the milky way, could you clearly see the milky way with your bare eyes at the scene or just the bright twinkling stars?

    2. What's the camera and lens you used for those night-sky shots, especially ones with the milky way? I heard (or read) that only full-frame lenses can catch the milky way (and stars), and other lenses would only catch stars without the milky way. Is this true?

    Thanks for the help and Happy Holiday to you and your family!
    I'm not @Moab Man and certainly can't offer you definitive information, but the Milky Way isn't visible year-round. There are times when it is below the horizon. And I'm pretty sure you'd be able to see at least part of it with your eyes providing there isn't light pollution around. When I was a kid, we'd visit my grandparents in upstate PA. I vaguely remember seeing it although at the time I didn't know what it was. I'd always search for the Big Dipper.

    There are apps that will help you locate it. I have Photo Pills, but there is a big learning curve to the app (and it costs around $10 I think). Not sure if there are other apps which might be free and/or be easier to understand.

    This article might offer you some helpful information.

    https://darksitefinder.com/how-to-see-the-milky-way/
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2020 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  7. #57
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    Re: Newbie's question

    Flikr image taken with D3500 long exposure.

    Flickr
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100

  8. #58
    Senior Member

    Re: Newbie's question

    Hi Cindy,

    Thanks for sharing. I just want to know if our bare eyes can see the milky way... Now thanks to your experience, the answer is a certain yes. I did purchase the photopills app and am digging into it now... quite a heavy app! Tks

  9. #59
    Senior Member
    Challenge Team
    cwgrizz's Avatar

    Re: Newbie's question

    @blackstar Looks like you are getting some good info. As to wondering what Moabman was using, hover over his photos and you will see the info of camera, shutter speed, etc.
    Well at least the last one. Ha!
    Walt

    D750; D7100; D5300;
    18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 G II VR; AF-S VR 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G IF-ED; AF-S 85mm f1.8; Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 (IF) DX II; 200-500mm f5.6E ED VR; AF-S VR 24-120mm f/4G ED; TC14E II



  10. #60
    Senior Member

    Re: Newbie's question

    Hi Dawg,

    You answered my second question and it's good news! I think I have read that people used different cameras -- full-frame and APS-C, to catch the night sky images at same location, same time and it turned out the image shot by full-frame camera show all the stars AND the milky way, but APS-C only stars with the milky way almost non-existent! That made me sad to think D3500 will do poor job on the milky way. But now the image from the link shows D3500 can actually do a decent job on the milky way. (I almost plunged into buying the Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 IF ED UMC Ultra Wide Angle Fixed Lens w/ Built-in AE Chip for Nikon as I reckon it will certainly help even D3500 is still an aps-c.)

    Anyway, so far it's a bumpy road I am on, but I'll keep going... and too bad as Cindy hint, and photopills states: from Nov to Feb, the milky way will be invisible...

    So glad knowing you guys, and Happy Holiday to you all!





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