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  1. #1
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    Lenses for Real Estate/Architecture photography

    I have been researching doing some real estate photography. Several of these companies require (for my DX D7200) 10mm and one even requires a fisheye like the 10.5. I have a Tokina 11-16. 1) is a fisheye really used for real estate? 2) is there that big of difference between a 10mm and my 11-16?


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  2. #2
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    RocketCowboy's Avatar

    Re: Lenses for Real Estate/Architecture photography

    That seems pretty wide to me. Granted, on the crop sensor, a 10mm will perform more like a 15mm relative to field of view, but will full frame I still see the 16-35mm f/4 being pretty commonly used. Nikon's wides tilt-shift lens is currently only 19mm.

    I would think the perspective distortion from a fisheye lens would create a lot of time in post processing to straighten out all the lines...
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    Charlie, aka RocketCowboy

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  3. #3
    Senior Member

    Re: Lenses for Real Estate/Architecture photography

    No doubt in my mind, Sigma 8-16mm. It's an ultrawide, rectilinear lens, which means for real estate you don't get all those bent, warps lines that they're going to ask you to fix when you shoot it with a normal ultra-wide. Take a hard look at real estate photos and you'll never see curved walls. Why spend the extra time in post having to get all that stuff right when you can see exactly what you're getting in-camera.
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    Jake

    The imitator is a poor kind of creature. If the man who paints only the tree, or flower, or other surface he sees before him were an artist, the king of artists would be the photographer. James McNeill Whistler

  4. #4
    Senior Member

    Re: Lenses for Real Estate/Architecture photography

    As for Fisheyes, yes, they are used and they are corrected in post. Lightroom/ACR will actually do a fairly decent job in removing the severe pincushion you get with one (at least it does with my Sigma 15mm and Rokinon 12mm), and then you need to run 2 verticals using the Transform tool to get them straight, but it will crop out big chunks of the corners so you need to know that ahead of time before shooting.
    Jake

    The imitator is a poor kind of creature. If the man who paints only the tree, or flower, or other surface he sees before him were an artist, the king of artists would be the photographer. James McNeill Whistler

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    pforsell's Avatar

    Re: Lenses for Real Estate/Architecture photography

    If your client wants 360 panoramas, then the fisheye is the right choice with a robust stitching software.
    9 Nikon single-digit pro bodies from D1H to D5.
    12 Nikon three-digit consumer bodies from D100 and up.
    56 Nikkor prime lenses from AIS 8/2.8 to AFS 400/2.8VR
    4 Nikkor zoom lenses: 14-24/2.8, 17-35/2.8, 28-70/2.8, 70-200/2.8VR
    My fastest lens is f/1.2 (x3) and slowest f/2.8


  6. #6
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    hark's Avatar

    Re: Lenses for Real Estate/Architecture photography

    Quote Originally Posted by Dsiner View Post
    I have been researching doing some real estate photography. Several of these companies require (for my DX D7200) 10mm and one even requires a fisheye like the 10.5. I have a Tokina 11-16. 1) is a fisheye really used for real estate? 2) is there that big of difference between a 10mm and my 11-16?
    Quote Originally Posted by BackdoorHippie View Post
    As for Fisheyes, yes, they are used and they are corrected in post. Lightroom/ACR will actually do a fairly decent job in removing the severe pincushion you get with one (at least it does with my Sigma 15mm and Rokinon 12mm), and then you need to run 2 verticals using the Transform tool to get them straight, but it will crop out big chunks of the corners so you need to know that ahead of time before shooting.
    Jake, please correct me if I'm wrong, but before I got my fisheye, didn't you tell me the curved lines could be added to a photo taken with a rectilinear lens? I thought I'm remembering you adding distortion to one of your photos as an example. It would be far cheaper to add a fisheye effect in post rather than spending the money if cost was an issue or if a fisheye isn't a lens that is really desired.

    If I had several photos taken with my fisheye, I'd try it out myself. I hardly ever use it and moved all the files off my computer.
    Cindy
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    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  7. #7
    Senior Member

    Re: Lenses for Real Estate/Architecture photography

    Quote Originally Posted by hark View Post
    Jake, please correct me if I'm wrong, but before I got my fisheye, didn't you tell me the curved lines could be added to a photo taken with a rectilinear lens? I thought I'm remembering you adding distortion to one of your photos as an example. It would be far cheaper to add a fisheye effect in post rather than spending the money if cost was an issue or if a fisheye isn't a lens that is really desired.

    If I had several photos taken with my fisheye, I'd try it out myself. I hardly ever use it and moved all the files off my computer.
    Distortion can be added/removed to anything, and there are all sorts of plugins that will do a fisheye look, but it's one of those close but not quite things. I don't recall that I've ever added distortion to the 8-16mm.
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    Jake

    The imitator is a poor kind of creature. If the man who paints only the tree, or flower, or other surface he sees before him were an artist, the king of artists would be the photographer. James McNeill Whistler





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