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  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Scott Murray's Avatar

    Post your Mammals

    Post your Mammals
    Couldn't find this so I started one.

    Hyrax
    FACT FILE:
    Swahili Name: Pelele or Wibari
    Scientific Name: Rock hyrax (Procavia capensis), yellow-spotted hyrax (Heterohyrax brucei), tree hyrax (Dendrohyrax dorsalis)
    Size: 12 inches at the shoulder
    Weight: 5 to 9 pounds
    Lifespan: 12 years
    Habitat: Dry savanna to dense rain forest
    Diet: Herbivorous
    Gestation: 7 months
    Predators: Leopard, pythons, large birds, servals, civets

    The hyrax is so unlike other animals that it is placed in a separate order (Hyracoidea) by itself. It is said to be the elephant's nearest living relative. This is true to a certain extent, but misleading since the relationship stems from a remote ancestor common to hyraxes, sea cows (dugongs and manatees) and elephants. These three are unlike other mammals, but they share various if disproportionate physiological similarities in teeth, leg and foot bones, testes (that do not descend into a scrotum) and other more obscure details.

    Physical Characteristics
    The hyrax, also called rock rabbit or dassie, is a small furry mammal. It looks like a robust, oversized guinea pig, or a rabbit with rounded ears and no tail. Hyraxes have stumpy toes with hooflike nails, four toes on each front foot and three on each back foot. The longer, clawlike nails on the inside toes of the back feet are used for grooming and scratching. The bottoms of the feet have a rubbery texture to assist in climbing steep rock surfaces and trees.

    Of the three hyrax species, two are known as rock (or bush) hyrax and the third as tree hyrax. In the field it is sometimes difficult to differentiate among them.

    The rock hyrax has the widest distribution in East Africa. Its coat is yellowish or grayish-brown, and the dorsal spot (a bare scent gland on the back covered with longer hair) is covered with black or yellow hair. Its head is more rounded than other types of hyraxes, and the nose is blunt.

    The yellow-spotted hyrax, or rock rabbit, is smaller in size and has a more pointed, rodentlike nose. Generally it has a conspicuous white patch above the eye, and its dorsal spot is whitish or yellowish. It is sometimes seen in company of other types of hyrax, but species do not interbreed.

    Tree hyraxes, unsurprisingly, spend a lot of time in trees. In some areas they are hunted for their thick, soft, long hair. They have a white or yellow dorsal spot.

    Habitat
    Hyraxes are very adaptable. In East Africa they live at sea level and up to altitudes of over 14,000 feet and in habitats ranging from dry savanna to dense rainforest to cold Afro-alpine moorland.

    Behavior
    Rock hyraxes do not dig burrows. They live in colonies of 50 or so in natural crevices of rocks or bolders. They regularly use "latrines" and in areas they inhabit, conspicuous white deposits from their urine form on rock faces. They are active in the daytime and can be seen feeding or sunning themselves near the entrances to their shelters.

    Hyrax vocalizations include twitters, growls, whistles and shrieks. One group will answer the contact calls of another group. The raucous nocturnal shriek of the tree hyrax is most impressive, starting as a squeak or whistle, then rising to a piglike squeal and finally to a child's scream. Hyraxes do most of their screaming as they ascend or descend trees during the night.

    The tree hyrax is nocturnal and not as social as the rock hyraxes. They are often found in pairs and do not form much larger groups.

    Although naturally shy, hyraxes in captivity become quite tame. Their habits of using latrines and eating a variety of vegetative material make them easy to keep. They have been recorded as living as long 12 years.

    Diet
    Rock hyraxes spend several hours sunbathing in the mornings, followed by short excursions to feed. They eat quickly with the family group facing out from a circle to watch for potential predators, feeding on grasses, herbage, leaves, fruit, insects, lizards and birds' eggs. After biting off a mouthful of grass or leaves, the hyrax looks up and cautiously checks the vicinity. If the territorial male gives the shrill shriek of alarm, the hyraxes jump or scuttle to cover where they remain frozen, without moving, until the danger has passed. They can go a long time without water, apparently obtaining enough moisture from their food. Tree hyraxes feed on leaves and fruits.

    Post your Mammals-dsc_8176.jpg


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  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Scott Murray's Avatar

    Re: Post your Mammals

    Post your Mammals
    Post your Mammals-dsc_8177.jpg

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    dramtastic's Avatar

    Re: Post your Mammals

    Scotties on Fire!(Austin Powers).
    Thanks/Like Scott Murray, Krs_2007 Thanks/liked this post
     

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Scott Murray's Avatar

    Re: Post your Mammals

    Post your Mammals
    Ugandan Kob - found on the Ugandan coat of arms.

    Post your Mammals-dsc_7247.jpg

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    dramtastic's Avatar

    Re: Post your Mammals

    Post your Mammals
    Hyrax
     

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    dramtastic's Avatar

    Re: Post your Mammals

    Post your Mammals
    Mongoose

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Scott Murray's Avatar

    Re: Post your Mammals

    Post your Mammals
    Waterbuck
    FACT FILE:
    Swahili Name: Kuro
    Scientific Name: Common waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus ellipsiprymnus); defassa waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus defassa)
    Size: 50 inches at the shoulder
    Weight: 330 to 500 pounds
    Lifespan: Up to 18 years in captivity
    Habitat: Savanna grasslands, riveine forests and woodlands
    Diet: Grazers
    Gestation: 280 days
    Predators: Hyenas, lions, leopards, hunting dogs, cheetahs, crocodiles

    Despite its name, the waterbuck is not truly aquatic nor as much at home in water and swamps as is the sitatunga or lechwe. It does, however, take refuge there to escape predators.

    Physical Characteristics

    The waterbuck has a long-haired, often shaggy brown-gray coat that emits a smelly, greasy secretion thought to be for waterproofing. In East Africa two types occur, the common waterbuck and the defassa waterbuck, distinguished only by the white pattern on the rump. The common waterbuck has a conspicuous white ring encircling a dark rump, while the defassa has wide white patches on either side of the rump.

    The waterbuck is a large, robust animal; males are generally about 25 percent larger than the females. Waterbucks have large, rounded ears and white patches above the eyes, around the nose and mouth and on the throat. Only the males have horns, which are prominently ringed and as long as 40 inches. The horns are widely spaced and curve gracefully back and up. They are sometimes used with lethal results when males fight one another over territories.

    Habitat
    As its name would indicate, the waterbuck inhabits areas that are close to water in savanna grasslands, gallery forests and riverine woodlands south of the Sahara. Such habitats not only provide sustenance but long grasses and watery places in which to hide from predators.

    Behavior
    Although males do compete for and hold territories, the waterbuck is generally a quiet, sedentary animal. Like some other antelopes, the male does not mark his territory with dung or urine, as his presence and smell are apparently sufficient. He tries to retain females that wander into his area, but is seldom successful for long, since the females have large home ranges and, in herds of five to 25, are constantly crossing in and out of males territories. Waterbucks do not migrate or move great distances, so territories are usually held year round.

    Diet
    The waterbuck's habitat furnishes them with a year-round source of food. Mainly grazers, they consume types of coarse grass seldom eaten by other grazing animals and occasionally browse leaves from certain trees and bushes. They feed in the mornings and at night, and rest and ruminate the remainder of the time.

    Caring for the Young
    Calves are generally born throughout the year, although breeding becomes more seasonal in some areas, after which a single young is born. The mother hides her young for about 3 weeks, returning three to four times a day to suckle it. Each suckling session lasts only about five minutes, during which time the mother cleans the calf so that no odor is left to attract predators. Even so, there is a high rate of calf mortality.

    Although the calves begin to eat grass when they are young, they are nursed for as long as 6 to 8 months. After weaning, they begin to wander-off young males often form all-male groups near the occupied territories, while the young females stay in their mother's group. The waterbuck does not reach adult weight until about 31/2 years. Females mate again soon after bearing young (within 2 to 5 weeks) so the population can increase rapidly.

    Predators
    Hyenas, lions, and leopards are the major predators, but crocodiles, hunting dogs and cheetahs also take waterbuck.

    Did you know?

    • The meat of older waterbuck takes on an unpleasant odor from the waterproofing secretions of its sweat glands, prompting predators to choose other prey.
    • If the defessa and common waterbucks have bordering ranges they often interbreed; as a result, some scientists consider the two groups as a single species.


    Post your Mammals-dsc_7266.jpg

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Krs_2007's Avatar

    Re: Post your Mammals

    I'm starting to think you live in a zoo Scott.
    Thanks/Like Scott Murray, Bill16, donaldjledet Thanks/liked this post
     
    Kevin

    www.kevinstillwellphotography.com

    "A great photograph is one that fully expresses what one feels, in the deepest sense, about what is being photographed." — Ansel Adams

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    SB-700, SB-910 AF Speedlight
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    Eye-Fi Pro X2, WU-1B, PocketWizard Plus III's
    Raynox 250

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Scott Murray's Avatar

    Re: Post your Mammals

    Quote Originally Posted by Krs_2007 View Post
    I'm starting to think you live in a zoo Scott.
    Nah I just travel alot.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Alan's Avatar

    Re: Post your Mammals

    Post your Mammals
    American Bison (although most people call it a buffalo)


    Post your Mammals-dscn9218.jpg
     
    “Sometimes I arrive just when God's ready to have someone click the shutter." ...Ansel Adams

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/awellsphoto/

    Nikon D5600, Nikon P510, Nikkor AF P DX 18-55, Nikkor AF P DX 70-300, Tamron SP 150-600 Di VC USD





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