+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    nikonpup's Avatar
     
    DO NOT GROW UP!!
    IT IS A TRAP!!
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/pups_pleasure/






  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Kevin H's Avatar

    Re: Birds in flight 10 tips

    In a perfect world and you do this as a living
    Nikon D7200
    Nikon D7100 (she's Dead)
    Nikon D5100
    Nikon 55-300
    Nikon 18-105
    Nikon 35mm F1.8 DX
    Tamron 90 F2.8 macro
    Sigma 150-500

    My Flickr

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    wev's Avatar

    Re: Birds in flight 10 tips

    I just let somebody else do it -- have enough trouble when they are standing still
    wev
    American Silversmiths

    d500
    d5300 x 2
    Tamron 150-600/5-6.3, Tamron 16-300mm/3.5-6.3, Tamron 90mm/2.8 macro
    Nikon 18-55mm/3.6-5.6, Nikon 55-200mm/4-5.6
    Nikon 35mm/1.8, Nikon 50mm/1.8
    Vanguard Alta Pro 263AT tripod, CP324 monopod
    SBH 100 ball head, PH 32 pan head
    SB-700 Speedlight

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    wev's Avatar

    Re: Birds in flight 10 tips

    And, quite frankly, I think better pictures have been posted here.
    wev
    American Silversmiths

    d500
    d5300 x 2
    Tamron 150-600/5-6.3, Tamron 16-300mm/3.5-6.3, Tamron 90mm/2.8 macro
    Nikon 18-55mm/3.6-5.6, Nikon 55-200mm/4-5.6
    Nikon 35mm/1.8, Nikon 50mm/1.8
    Vanguard Alta Pro 263AT tripod, CP324 monopod
    SBH 100 ball head, PH 32 pan head
    SB-700 Speedlight

  5. #5
    Matt Krei
    10 Gauge's Avatar

    Re: Birds in flight 10 tips

    Conflicting information.....

    4. Use the Right Camera Settings

    Make your life easy with these settings:

    • Aperture Priority mode
    • Matrix/Evaluative metering
    • Auto ISO settings up to whatever ISO settings you are comfortable with for your camera
    • Shutter Speed of at least 1/500th of a second or faster
    • AF-C focus mode for Nikon users and AI-Servo mode for Canon
    • Highest frames per second burst mode setting
    • 9-point or 21-point zone focus or 3-D tracking




    Wouldn't you want shutter priority mode?
    Nikon D750
    *
    Tamron SP 24-70mm /2.8 DI VC USD
    *Nikon AF-S 50mm
    /1.8 G
    *Nikon AF 85mm
    /1.4 D
    *Tokina AT-X 100mm
    /2.8 PRO D Macro
    *Sigma 150‑600mm
    /5‑6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    *3 x Yongnuo YN568EX Flashes + YN-622N Remotes

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    WayneF's Avatar

    Re: Birds in flight 10 tips

    Quote Originally Posted by 10 Gauge View Post
    Wouldn't you want shutter priority mode?
    The idea is that we always have to keep a watch on all of the ISO, aperture, and shutter speed values.

    Auto ISO only works (only increases) when the normal hardware reaches its physical limits. If not hitting a limit, no Auto ISO increase. Auto ISO is for when all else fails.

    If we use shutter priority, the aperture will always be open wide open before Auto ISO starts to increase. Probably not the best plan, unless you specifically want wide open aperture. But in any dimmer light, Shutter priority will absolutely insure wide open aperture.

    Likewise, if we use aperture priority, we can set the aperture we want, but then shutter speed can fall to the lowest shutter speed. But we avoid that being the actual 30 seconds hardware limit ... with the clever Minimum shutter speed set in the Auto ISO menu, which is intended to be the actual Auto ISO threshold. We can set that to be 1/500 second as stated. Then if shutter becomes as slow as we set that limit (the 1/500 second), then the dropping shutter speed holds there, and then Auto ISO increases. Shutter speed can of course still go slower when we hit the Maximum ISO limit.

    We do still need to realize two things... 1) Any Auto ISO value between Minimum ISO and Maximum ISO will use this Minimum shutter speed we set, so we need to give it some thought.
    And 2), things can still change, and we always need to keep a constant watch on everything.

    I thought it was a surprisingly good article.. Much more meat than we normally see on the internet.
    Last edited by WayneF; 06-23-2015 at 02:47 AM.

  7. #7
    Banned

    Re: Birds in flight 10 tips

    First thing is to find some birds ..they seem to be disapearing from our planet....

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    mikew's Avatar

    Re: Birds in flight 10 tips

    I would disagree with the statement wait for the right conditions,especially when learning,take anything and every thing its the only way to improve.
    Mike

    Nikon D500,Sigma 100-400,Sigma 105 macro

    Nikon 1 V2,FT-1,10-30mm 30-110mm Viltrox extension tubes








  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Felisek's Avatar

    Re: Birds in flight 10 tips

    Quote Originally Posted by mikew View Post
    I would disagree with the statement wait for the right conditions,especially when learning,take anything and every thing its the only way to improve.
    This is what I'm trying to do. However, pigeons and seagulls are getting boring.
    Thanks/Like BobB Thanks/liked this post
     
    Marek
    my flickr
    Nikon D500, D7100
    Tokina 11-16 mm f/2.8 AT-X Pro DX II
    Sigma 17-50 mm f/2.8 EX DC HSM OS
    Sigma 50-150 mm f/2.8 APO EX DC OS
    Nikkor 55-200 mm f/4-5.6 VR
    Tamron 70-300 mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD

    Sigma 150-600 mm f/5-6.3 DG HSM OS
    Nikkor 85 mm f/1.8 G

  10. #10
    Matt Krei
    10 Gauge's Avatar

    Re: Birds in flight 10 tips

    Quote Originally Posted by WayneF View Post
    The idea is that we always have to keep a watch on all of the ISO, aperture, and shutter speed values.

    Auto ISO only works (only increases) when the normal hardware reaches its physical limits. If not hitting a limit, no Auto ISO increase. Auto ISO is for when all else fails.

    If we use shutter priority, the aperture will always be open wide open before Auto ISO starts to increase. Probably not the best plan, unless you specifically want wide open aperture. But in any dimmer light, Shutter priority will absolutely insure wide open aperture.

    Likewise, if we use aperture priority, we can set the aperture we want, but then shutter speed can fall to the lowest shutter speed. But we avoid that being the actual 30 seconds hardware limit ... with the clever Minimum shutter speed set in the Auto ISO menu, which is intended to be the actual Auto ISO threshold. We can set that to be 1/500 second as stated. Then if shutter becomes as slow as we set that limit (the 1/500 second), then the dropping shutter speed holds there, and then Auto ISO increases. Shutter speed can of course still go slower when we hit the Maximum ISO limit.

    We do still need to realize two things... 1) Any Auto ISO value between Minimum ISO and Maximum ISO will use this Minimum shutter speed we set, so we need to give it some thought.
    And 2), things can still change, and we always need to keep a constant watch on everything.

    I thought it was a surprisingly good article.. Much more meat than we normally see on the internet.
    Learn something new every day, I didn't realize there was a minimum shutter speed setting in the Auto ISO menu. I've actually never used Auto ISO, but it sounds like something I may need to look in to checking out.
    Nikon D750
    *
    Tamron SP 24-70mm /2.8 DI VC USD
    *Nikon AF-S 50mm
    /1.8 G
    *Nikon AF 85mm
    /1.4 D
    *Tokina AT-X 100mm
    /2.8 PRO D Macro
    *Sigma 150‑600mm
    /5‑6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    *3 x Yongnuo YN568EX Flashes + YN-622N Remotes





Quick Reply Quick Reply

If you are already a member, please login above before posting.

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •