BF Hammer

Senior Member
Many of us have the Sigma 150-600mm C lens. It's one of the best value super-telephotos out there. For all of it's great points, it does have a shortcoming in the tripod foot. Literally, it's too short.

Don't we just have to install a long Arca-Swiss quick-release plate and it's all good? Not quite there. Here is the lens tripod collar removed.

20220625_10.JPG20220625_09.JPG

Problem we have here is that there is only a single threaded hole for mounting the Arca plate. For a lens of this weight with the foot nowhere near the balance point, simple gravity pull will make the lens twist free at a bad time. It's also a poor handle for carrying the lens. As an aside, Kirk Photo has a different solution to this, and I would recommend that for those unwilling to take a drill to an aftermarket part like I am going to discuss here. Link at the end of post.

There is available on Ebay and sometimes Amazon or Ali Express an aftermarket lens collar for this particular lens. I bought one years ago as my solution to the lens twisting. It has a built-in Arca-Swiss mount foot.

20220625_08.JPG20220625_18.JPG20220625_17.JPG20220625_19.JPG

It is shaped more squared than the OEM collar, so it can be too tight for fingers at the handgrip if the lens is rotated to that direction. It also is far too short to properly balance, even when at the 150mm position. On a gimbal head, this just won't do.

Ideally the foot needs to be about 125-130mm long. That reaches the balance point at 600mm and a typical Arca-Swiss clamp will fully contact. I cannot find a plate that length in my searches. 150mm would do, they are a lot more rare to find than 120mm Arca plates. I am doing my mod here with a 120mm long plate that I had as a spare in the house. The 120mm mount plate is going to replace the iShoot lens collar foot.

20220625_20.JPG

I already did my drilling before the photo shoot. It involved removing the 2 screws holding the iShoot foot, and using the holes as my template to drill the holes into the Arca plate. I had to move holes a bit forward by a millimeter or 2 so they could clear the thick material at the edge. I removed the safety stop screws and taped the plates together, placed into a vice, and put the drill bit through the original plate's holes and started drilling the holes. I removed the guide and finished drilling the holes. I used some machine oil to lubricate the drill bit here. Even with all this the holes became offset to one side just a bit. I had to cut them a bit oval to make things line up. I had to test-fit and adjust the holes a couple of times before it was right.

20220625_16.JPG20220625_22.JPG

The finished modification. This is a very minimalist mod, and completely reversible for the lens. Even the 120mm Arca plate could be used otherwise for the most part. I can balance the lens at 600mm in my gimbal now, but I have to move this back about 5-6mm in the Arca-Swiss clamp so it is not fully gripped. But it's gripped about 90%, which is fine for this lens. And just as important, you can use it as a proper carry handle. It's balanced in the hand and does not fatigue your grip. This may not be the right solution if you are carrying your rig on a sling.

20220625_15.JPG20220625_13.JPG20220625_14.JPG20220625_11.JPG20220625_12.JPG

Now here is the Kirk Photo solution using the original lens collar and foot. They sell an Arca plate with a bar that rests against the edge of the foot to prevent the lens from twisting free. Their recommended product for this Sigma lens is in this link.
https://kirkphoto.com/lens-mounting/sigma/150-600mm-f-5-6-3-dg-os-hsm-contemporary/lens-plate-for-sigma-150-600mm-f-5-6-3-dg-os-hsm-contemporary.html

I however recommend a different plate they sell that is more generic. The recommended plate is still a problem as it is not the recommended 130mm or longer. I think this one would work better, but it includes more parts on it that needed.
https://kirkphoto.com/lens-mounting...ates/universal-multi-use-lens-plate-5-25.html

klp5251_2.jpg
 

BF Hammer

Senior Member
An attempt to show the balance points of the lens at 150mm and 600mm. This is with a D750 plus an attached L-bracket mounted. This is a heavier back-end than you would have with D3400 or similar smaller body camera, so I would expect that at 600mm it would be necessary to slide even further to the rear. That is why I recommend a plate longer than 120mm long.

150mm mounted to Wimberley Sidekick gimbal
20220701_01.JPG

600mm, we have moved 3-4mm further back than the plate fits inside of the clamp
20220701_02.JPG
 

blackstar

Senior Member
Many of us have the Sigma 150-600mm C lens. It's one of the best value super-telephotos out there. For all of it's great points, it does have a shortcoming in the tripod foot. Literally, it's too short.

Don't we just have to install a long Arca-Swiss quick-release plate and it's all good? Not quite there. Here is the lens tripod collar removed.

View attachment 377147View attachment 377146

Problem we have here is that there is only a single threaded hole for mounting the Arca plate. For a lens of this weight with the foot nowhere near the balance point, simple gravity pull will make the lens twist free at a bad time. It's also a poor handle for carrying the lens. As an aside, Kirk Photo has a different solution to this, and I would recommend that for those unwilling to take a drill to an aftermarket part like I am going to discuss here. Link at the end of post.

There is available on Ebay and sometimes Amazon or Ali Express an aftermarket lens collar for this particular lens. I bought one years ago as my solution to the lens twisting. It has a built-in Arca-Swiss mount foot.

View attachment 377145View attachment 377143View attachment 377144View attachment 377152

It is shaped more squared than the OEM collar, so it can be too tight for fingers at the handgrip if the lens is rotated to that direction. It also is far too short to properly balance, even when at the 150mm position. On a gimbal head, this just won't do.

Ideally the foot needs to be about 125-130mm long. That reaches the balance point at 600mm and a typical Arca-Swiss clamp will fully contact. I cannot find a plate that length in my searches. 150mm would do, they are a lot more rare to find than 120mm Arca plates. I am doing my mod here with a 120mm long plate that I had as a spare in the house. The 120mm mount plate is going to replace the iShoot lens collar foot.

View attachment 377150

I already did my drilling before the photo shoot. It involved removing the 2 screws holding the iShoot foot, and using the holes as my template to drill the holes into the Arca plate. I had to move holes a bit forward by a millimeter or 2 so they could clear the thick material at the edge. I removed the safety stop screws and taped the plates together, placed into a vice, and put the drill bit through the original plate's holes and started drilling the holes. I removed the guide and finished drilling the holes. I used some machine oil to lubricate the drill bit here. Even with all this the holes became offset to one side just a bit. I had to cut them a bit oval to make things line up. I had to test-fit and adjust the holes a couple of times before it was right.

View attachment 377151View attachment 377149

The finished modification. This is a very minimalist mod, and completely reversible for the lens. Even the 120mm Arca plate could be used otherwise for the most part. I can balance the lens at 600mm in my gimbal now, but I have to move this back about 5-6mm in the Arca-Swiss clamp so it is not fully gripped. But it's gripped about 90%, which is fine for this lens. And just as important, you can use it as a proper carry handle. It's balanced in the hand and does not fatigue your grip. This may not be the right solution if you are carrying your rig on a sling.

View attachment 377153View attachment 377155View attachment 377154View attachment 377148View attachment 377156

Now here is the Kirk Photo solution using the original lens collar and foot. They sell an Arca plate with a bar that rests against the edge of the foot to prevent the lens from twisting free. Their recommended product for this Sigma lens is in this link.
https://kirkphoto.com/lens-mounting/sigma/150-600mm-f-5-6-3-dg-os-hsm-contemporary/lens-plate-for-sigma-150-600mm-f-5-6-3-dg-os-hsm-contemporary.html

I however recommend a different plate they sell that is more generic. The recommended plate is still a problem as it is not the recommended 130mm or longer. I think this one would work better, but it includes more parts on it that needed.
https://kirkphoto.com/lens-mounting...ates/universal-multi-use-lens-plate-5-25.html

View attachment 377158

I am planning to buy sigma 150-600mm C and concerned about using with tripod. So will this ( https://smile.amazon.com/Neewer-Pro.../dp/B098QG2JB8/ref=psdc_3347671_t1_B01I57SS5S ) and this ( https://smile.amazon.com/Haoge-Rele...88c-9a2a-eaf369c50cb7&pd_rd_i=B00Z40X42M&th=1 ) work out for the setting?

Thanks for verifying.
 

BF Hammer

Senior Member
@blackstar : It is even more important to be able to balance the lens on a longer size Arca plate when using any sort of gimbal head. You are going to find out quickly that the lens foot will still want to twist free from that Arca plate because there is only one possible place to attach a screw. You either Gorilla-Glue it down forever or else dig deeper in the pocket to buy the Kirk plate I linked to. That will have an adjustable bumper that will stop the foot from twisting on the screw.
 

blackstar

Senior Member
BF, Thanks for the quick reply. I was aware of the significance of balance and twist. Thought that both NEEWER and HITHUT 150mm have some kind of mechanism to prevent twisting, but not sure now... AW, just order the sigma lens and those two lens plates from AMZ (they have a seller put the lens on sale for $769 (new), I don't worry if it's a used or return. I can always return it for a refund or exchange). I'll see how it works out (Sunday's delivery day) and return one or both lens plates if not good.

The reason I didn't go with Kirk's plate: it requires using wrenches to set up. (maybe I'm too lazy)
 

blackstar

Senior Member
For what it is worth (I know, not much), I have been using my Sigma 150-600mm C with my D7200 without a hitch!

Mind sharing your experience with the Sigma? Do you often shoot by handheld? or tripod/monopod? What's your tripod setup with the Sigma? Thanks
 

BF Hammer

Senior Member
BF, Thanks for the quick reply. I was aware of the significance of balance and twist. Thought that both NEEWER and HITHUT 150mm have some kind of mechanism to prevent twisting, but not sure now... AW, just order the sigma lens and those two lens plates from AMZ (they have a seller put the lens on sale for $769 (new), I don't worry if it's a used or return. I can always return it for a refund or exchange). I'll see how it works out (Sunday's delivery day) and return one or both lens plates if not good.

The reason I didn't go with Kirk's plate: it requires using wrenches to set up. (maybe I'm too lazy)

The only thing on the HITHUT plate for preventing a twist is the rubber pads, and I know from experience that is basically useless with the weight of camera and lens applying torque force.

I have no DIY help for anybody adverse to turning a hex wrench that is included with the product. You will keep repair people employed in our economy.
 

Bikerbrent

Senior Member
I Have been using the Sigma 150-600mm with all three positions, Handheld, Tripod, and Monopod without a problem. I have used everything normally.
 

BF Hammer

Senior Member
I Have been using the Sigma 150-600mm with all three positions, Handheld, Tripod, and Monopod without a problem. I have used everything normally.

How do you attach your lens to tripod? Screw it in directly or use a quick-release? Have you ever tried to balance the lens on a gimbal head? Have you ever tried long exposure night photography on a star tracker?

Me personally, I find it impossible to securely screw an Arca-Swiss style quick release with the single screw hole provided on the lens foot. I have had the lens suddenly twist loose on it's own at least 2 times when shooting or transporting while attached to tripod. That was before I bought the i-Shoot replacement mounting foot which solved the twisting loose issue, but still left the lens front-heavy when extended to 600mm. That is a problem on a gimbal (it should be neutral in balance) and more problem on a star-tracker mount when you are unable to balance things out.
 

blackstar

Senior Member
My new Sigma 150-600mm C and two lens plates (TITHUT and Haoge) arrived today late afternoon. Tried to set them (z6ii+Sigma+ lens plate) up with my tripod (not particularly big). Turned out Haoge sens plate is a better choice for coming with both 1/4 and 3/8 screws. Both seemly work fine for adjusting the balance. My light tripod seems to take the whole thing well, but it is still to be seen when I take it to do a field test later. From the setup, I didn't detect any twist issue due to the single screw fix. But could be happening later? (Both plates do not have a bumper to stop twisting) Need more tests to make sure, but man, the Sigma is so heavy that I can't handhold the system long time as I can with my AF-P 70-300mm.
 

blackstar

Senior Member
Update: After field tries, both HITHUT and Haoge lens plates failed for twisting error (if the connecting screw is not driven in VERY tight). Decided to use Wimberley P-30 (with twisting-free hinges and safety stop screws).
 

Bikerbrent

Senior Member
Gee, both the HITHUT and Haoge lens plates have pretty decent reviews. Hope the Wimberley P-30 works for you! I sure don't know what to suggest!
 

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