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  1. #11
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    hark's Avatar

    Re: Which lens do I have?

    Quote Originally Posted by taylorkh View Post
    It looks like the D3400 and perhaps all DX format cameras are limited on the higher end lenses. Is that true? I do not see any over 300 listed on the Nikon site for DX cameras. Yes, I realize that a DX 300 is about equivalent to an FX 450. I think that a 70-300 will meet my needs with the D3400 and if not I will just have to move up to an FX format camera.
    Ken
    Ken, I don't understand what you mean by the DX bodies being limited on higher end lenses. Any compatible lenses will work on DX...and that includes high end lenses. If you mean Nikon doesn't make any DX lenses that are longer than 300mm, I don't think they do. Most people will either go with a third party lens such as Tamron or Sigma, or they will get longer Nikon FX lenses if they want a focal length beyond 300mm.

    Here is a list of current lenses that Nikon offers.
    https://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Pr...e#viewAllClick


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  2. #12
    Senior Member

    Re: Which lens do I have?

    Quote Originally Posted by taylorkh View Post
    It looks like the D3400 and perhaps all DX format cameras are limited on the higher end lenses. Is that true? I do not see any over 300 listed on the Nikon site for DX cameras. Yes, I realize that a DX 300 is about equivalent to an FX 450. I think that a 70-300 will meet my needs with the D3400 and if not I will just have to move up to an FX format camera.
    DX lenses can be thought of as lighter and lower cost. Less glass is needed because the smaller DX sensor captures a lesser area of the scene. I like to say corners are 'cut' in the DX lens. Figuratively and literally. FX lenses are built bigger and will cast a quality image over the larger FX sensor. There is no crop factor to think about here. The crop factor you hear about comes just by having a DX body. A DX or FX lens of the same focal length will give the same view on your camera. However, a DX lens used on a FX body can give vignetting.
    A non-Nikon lens to consider is the Tamron 70-300 SP. It is the one priced around $450 new (A005). I got mine a long time ago with a $100 rebate.
    I must have a really good camera.

  3. #13
    Senior Member

    Re: Which lens do I have?

    They say misery loves company and according to the article linked by Needa I have a lot of company trying to figure out what the heck Nikon is doing with so many 70-300 lenses. I think the gray market version of the DX VR subspecies makes the most sense for me. Thanks again Needa.

    And Hark, what I was trying to say was that the "better" lenses are available for the FX format cameras. This makes sense as the DX cameras tend to be more entry level. Looking at the page you linked to and grabbing a lens at random... The 180mm f/2.8D IF-ED prime lens for a $1,000 is FX format. I could not purchase such a lens, try it on my D3400, decide it was GREAT and replace the D3400 with a D5 to make better use of the lens. Again, I am inclined to the gray market 70-300 DX VR. It will probably do all I need and if I out grow it... Sell the whole D3400 collection on fleabay and start over with an FX camera.

    Which makes me wonder if I purchased a DSLR too soon (or too late)? I remember when the D1 hit the market at $5k. In one day the price of the Kodak pro DSLRs dropped from $25k to $10k. I think the D1 was about 2 1/2 megapixels - less than a throw away smartphone today. Two things deterred me from purchasing a DSLR. The camera I bought today for $5k would be worth $500 in a couple of years and the camera I purchased for $5k two years from now would make the current one look like a Brownie box camera. Programmable calculators and PCs worked enough of that financial mischief on my budget over the years

    The second thing and perhaps a bigger impediment was the lack of split screen focus on DSLRs. I lived and died by that on my film camera. I must say that I am VERY impressed by the auto-focus capabilities of the D3400. I could have done with that and without split screen.

    I don't know where this thread is heading but it has been fun. I need to take a trip to see my sister and rummage around the basement of the old family home. I recall that our Dad's Bush Pressman and all of his developing equipment is in the basement. Finding 4 by 5 black & white sheet film should be no harder than sorting out Nikon's 79-300 lens offerings

    Thanks to all for letting me vent a little.

    Ken

  4. #14
    Happy to be Canadian
    Super Mod
    Marcel's Avatar

    Re: Which lens do I have?

    Quote Originally Posted by taylorkh View Post
    The second thing and perhaps a bigger impediment was the lack of split screen focus on DSLRs. I lived and died by that on my film camera. I must say that I am VERY impressed by the auto-focus capabilities of the D3400. I could have done with that and without split screen.
    Ken
    Maybe you don't know this, but you can find split-screen focusing screens for modern DSLRs. I've myself replaced the focusing screens in most of my cameras (d700,7000,Df). You can find them on the net @ "focusingscreens.com" if my memory's right.
    It's a bit tricky to do, but not rocket science. This has allowed me to use my old manual focus glass on my newer cameras.

    I hope you find what you're looking for. But remember that all manual focus lenses were full frame lenses. Nikon never, as far as I know, sold a half frame camera. That was Olympus strength in the older film days.
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  5. #15
    Senior Member

    Re: Which lens do I have?

    Thanks Marcel,

    I do recall reading about converting a DSLR to split screen focus. As I recall it was somewhat costly and of course voided the warranty. Not something worth doing on a cheap DSLR and I'd hate to risk the warranty on an expensive DSLR.

    Anyhow I just pulled the trigger on the gray market 70-300 with VR. $155 for the lens and a Hoya UV (scratch) filter. According to the seller these lenses were removed from "kits" so I guess they are should be OK. If it works as expected I will shoot a lot of pictures. If it doesn't work I will shoot the camera

    Ken
    Thanks/Like Marcel Thanks/liked this post
     

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Needa's Avatar

    Re: Which lens do I have?

    Quote Originally Posted by taylorkh View Post
    Anyhow I just pulled the trigger on the gray market 70-300 with VR. $155 for the lens and a Hoya UV (scratch) filter. According to the seller these lenses were removed from "kits" so I guess they are should be OK. If it works as expected I will shoot a lot of pictures. If it doesn't work I will shoot the camera

    Ken
    Let us know how it works out for you.

  7. #17
    Senior Member

    Re: Which lens do I have?

    Will do Needa. Thanks again for the link.

    Now I need one to figure out the Nikon camera numbering scheme. I thought I had it figured that the lower the number of digits the higher end the camera. The Dn being the top of the line, the Dnnn being next and the Dnnnn being the lowest. Within a series, except for the Dn, a higher first digit meant a higher end camera (e.g. the D7200 being higher than the D3400) and within cameras of the same starting digit the rest were sequential (e.g. the D3400 replaced the D3300 which replaced the D3200). I was looking at my B&H catalog and found the D500 which is more expensive than any 4 digit camera but is only a 20 megapixel DX format. How did that camera get in the sequence? Perhaps it was the original 3 digit camera? This is making my head hurt

    But not as much as when I came across the Df. An analog DSLR. It brought tears to my eyes. But the price was too high, the specs too low and the body was PLASTIC. A neat idea though.

    Ken

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Needa's Avatar

    Re: Which lens do I have?

    At the bottom of this Wikipedia is Nikon DLSR timeline which may be of some help.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compar...n_DSLR_cameras

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Bob Blaylock's Avatar

    Re: Which lens do I have?

    Which lens do I have?
    Quote Originally Posted by 480sparky View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Needa View Post
    The G indicates an electronic diaphragm no aperture ring.
    E is electronic aperture.

    G simply means no aperture ring. They're still mechanically-actuated.
    Right.

    On the G lenses, the aperture is mechanically controlled via that lever on the back of the lens, which was originally just to allow the camera to hold the aperture open for viewing through the viewfinder, but in the later AI-S lenses, was calibrated to allow accurate control of the aperture by the camera body.

    Which lens do I have?-csc_2516zn.jpgWhich lens do I have?-csc_2517zn.jpg

  10. #20
    Senior Member

    Re: Which lens do I have?

    Thanks again Needa,

    I see that no-one manufactures the sensor in my D3400. I wonder what that means? It also looks like Nikon initially failed to start enough series to differentiate their products. Thus the D40 - D90 and I guess up to the D500. Sort of a dying branch of their family tree DNA speaking. Amazing.

    Ken





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