+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32
  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Horoscope Fish's Avatar

    Re: Problem exporting in Lightroom.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dangerspouse View Post
    Thank you!!
    I offer that link for informational purposes only.

    I'm not a Lr user personally, my workflow consists of Bridge, ACR and Photoshop; so if Jake and Fred recommend leaving that option turned off, I suggest you follow their advice.


    › See More: Problem exporting in Lightroom.
    Thanks/Like Dangerspouse Thanks/liked this post
     
    ~ Paul
    ....
    ....
    Primary Kit :: D850, Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 G2, Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8, Sigma 135mm f/1.8 Art, Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art,
    Godox Flashes & Triggers, Manfrotto X055PROB, 3-Legged Thing Airhed II... All Stuffed into a Manfrotto Pro Backpack 50
    ....
    ....
    ● ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ ๑۩۩๑ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ ●



  2. #22
    Senior Member
    Dangerspouse's Avatar

    Re: Problem exporting in Lightroom.

    Quote Originally Posted by Horoscope Fish View Post
    I offer that link for informational purposes only.

    I'm not a Lr user personally, my workflow consists of Bridge, ACR and Photoshop; so if Jake and Fred recommend leaving that option turned off, I suggest you follow their advice.

    Duly noted. Thanks again.

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    pforsell's Avatar

    Re: Problem exporting in Lightroom.

    I on the other hand prefer the XMP files. Their space usage is negligible - a few kilobytes each compared to a single raw file tens of megabytes a piece. Consider one job with a 1000 raw files amounting to 50 GB, a couple hundred exported JPEGs amounting to 1 GB and the corresponding XMP files amounting to 3 MB.

    Equally simple to back up to a NAS the whole folder containing all the NEF, JPEG and XMP files in one go.

    The reason for advocating the XMP files is that many other image editing software tools can read the instructions inside the XMP and continue editing from where LR left off. No need to export TIFF or PSD files (100+ MB each).

    If the terrible thing happens and the LR catalog database gets corrupted beyond repair (unlikely but possible) all the edits are lost. If the edits are in XMP files, the catalog can shoot itself to the orbit for all I care. It's redundant.

    I'm all for streamlining, automation and simplicity.
    9 Nikon single-digit pro bodies from D1H to D5.
    12 Nikon three-digit consumer bodies from D100 and up.
    56 Nikkor prime lenses from AIS 8/2.8 to AFS 400/2.8VR
    4 Nikkor zoom lenses: 14-24/2.8, 17-35/2.8, 28-70/2.8, 70-200/2.8VR
    My fastest lens is f/1.2 (x3) and slowest f/2.8


  4. #24
    Senior Member

    Re: Problem exporting in Lightroom.

    Quote Originally Posted by pforsell View Post
    I on the other hand prefer the XMP files. Their space usage is negligible - a few kilobytes each compared to a single raw file tens of megabytes a piece. Consider one job with a 1000 raw files amounting to 50 GB, a couple hundred exported JPEGs amounting to 1 GB and the corresponding XMP files amounting to 3 MB.

    Equally simple to back up to a NAS the whole folder containing all the NEF, JPEG and XMP files in one go.

    The reason for advocating the XMP files is that many other image editing software tools can read the instructions inside the XMP and continue editing from where LR left off. No need to export TIFF or PSD files (100+ MB each).

    If the terrible thing happens and the LR catalog database gets corrupted beyond repair (unlikely but possible) all the edits are lost. If the edits are in XMP files, the catalog can shoot itself to the orbit for all I care. It's redundant.

    I'm all for streamlining, automation and simplicity.
    When you're managing multiple catalogs, backups, etc. the XMP files can get cumbersome. Back up your catalog once a week, backup your computer, and there's a lot less to lose. Granted for a single catalog user who remembers to use Lightroom to move everything around XMP files are fine. I can always export them from the catalog when I need 'em, but I can't recreate them when they get lost in the shuffle. Fewer files for me is where simple, streamlined, and automated comes in.

    Potato, potahto.
    Jake

    The imitator is a poor kind of creature. If the man who paints only the tree, or flower, or other surface he sees before him were an artist, the king of artists would be the photographer. – James McNeill Whistler

  5. #25
    Staff
    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    Re: Problem exporting in Lightroom.

    Quote Originally Posted by BackdoorHippie View Post
    When you're managing multiple catalogs, backups, etc. the XMP files can get cumbersome. Back up your catalog once a week, backup your computer, and there's a lot less to lose. Granted for a single catalog user who remembers to use Lightroom to move everything around XMP files are fine. I can always export them from the catalog when I need 'em, but I can't recreate them when they get lost in the shuffle. Fewer files for me is where simple, streamlined, and automated comes in.

    Potato, potahto.
    So where did you learn about cataloging using Lightroom? I use Camera RAW and can access the folders which are stored by date and subject but perform all my editing through Photoshop, not Lightroom. I know there's a ton of info online about how to do it - just wondering if you have a name or two you can toss out who is good with explaining things. I still have trouble wrapping my head around cataloging.
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2019 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  6. #26
    Senior Member
    FredKingston's Avatar

    Re: Problem exporting in Lightroom.

    Think of the LR Catalogue as a small database. It stores the location of your files and all the edits that were applied to those files. You can further refine the process by creating multiple catalogues. I also use the default Year/month/day folder structure… but have now begun breaking my catalogues up into single year catalogues…

    LR lets you “save” your catalogues in a specific drive/subdirectory… I have a subdirectory named “Catalogues” on my main drive… for a couple of reasons. 1. my main drive is an SSD drive so the catalogue reads/writes very fast. 2. My catalogue directory also gets backed up to several places… When I import my images in LR, I have LR Copy the files to the year/month/day directors on a separate USB drive… That drive, in and of itself has it’s own backup scheme to several other drives…

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Dangerspouse's Avatar

    Re: Problem exporting in Lightroom.

    I think I may have discovered at least part of the problem. A big part, according to my stepdaughter.

    My stepdaughter is a robotics engineer, and when I explained to her what was happening she just laughed. "Your computer was already old in 2007 when you got it as a refurb. You expect it to run modern programs that require more memory and processing power than it was built with?"

    So I guess it's time to upgrade. I just hope it doesn't cost me more than I'm going to make from my pictures....

    BTW, a massive "THANK YOU!!" to everyone here who took the time to reply to my question here. You all are very generous, and extremely knowledgeable. I appreciate it more than I can say.

  8. #28
    Senior Member

    Re: Problem exporting in Lightroom.

    Quote Originally Posted by hark View Post
    I still have trouble wrapping my head around cataloging.
    It confuses the heck out of me. When it comes to software, I have the attention span of a four year old.
    Thanks/Like Dangerspouse Thanks/liked this post
     
    D810; D7200; AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8G ED; AF-S 24-120mm f/4G ED VR; Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 Sport; Sigma 2X Teleconverter;
    AF-S 50mm f/1.8G; AF-S 85mm f/1.8G - Old non-AF; 105mm f/2.5; 28mm f/2.8 - Godox V860II & AD200

  9. #29
    Senior Member

    Re: Problem exporting in Lightroom.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dangerspouse View Post
    I think I may have discovered at least part of the problem. A big part, according to my stepdaughter.

    My stepdaughter is a robotics engineer, and when I explained to her what was happening she just laughed. "Your computer was already old in 2007 when you got it as a refurb. You expect it to run modern programs that require more memory and processing power than it was built with?"

    So I guess it's time to upgrade. I just hope it doesn't cost me more than I'm going to make from my pictures....

    BTW, a massive "THANK YOU!!" to everyone here who took the time to reply to my question here. You all are very generous, and extremely knowledgeable. I appreciate it more than I can say.
    Make sure that your upgrade has a solid state hard drive. That made a huge difference on my PC.
    Thanks/Like Dangerspouse Thanks/liked this post
     
    D810; D7200; AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8G ED; AF-S 24-120mm f/4G ED VR; Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 Sport; Sigma 2X Teleconverter;
    AF-S 50mm f/1.8G; AF-S 85mm f/1.8G - Old non-AF; 105mm f/2.5; 28mm f/2.8 - Godox V860II & AD200

  10. #30
    Senior Member

    Re: Problem exporting in Lightroom.

    Quote Originally Posted by hark View Post
    So where did you learn about cataloging using Lightroom? I use Camera RAW and can access the folders which are stored by date and subject but perform all my editing through Photoshop, not Lightroom. I know there's a ton of info online about how to do it - just wondering if you have a name or two you can toss out who is good with explaining things. I still have trouble wrapping my head around cataloging.
    Are you confusing Catalogs with Collections? Collections are supposedly "powerful ways to organize your photos" but I find them counterintuitive for the way I shoot. Maybe it's easier when you're shooting multiple commercial shoots across many days and want to be able to access all of them en masse while keeping shots organized by day, which makes sense. That said, I don't use them.

    Catalogs are essentially the organization of my photos and the raw edits that go with them. I have a "Current" catalog which covers all my non-drone and infrared shooting for the current year only. A couple weeks after the end of the year I will take all the photos in the current catalog from the year just finished and create a new catalog from them, and then after verifying the new catalog I will remove (not delete!!) the old photos from the current catalog leaving me with just the current year and other ancillary permanent residents of the current catalog (textures, prints to sell, etc.).

    I organize my shooting by year and by topic, so I have one catalog per year for all my regular shooting with subfolders built around events and dates (Musikfest, Summer Vacation, etc.), or subject matter (street, concerts, birds, wildlife, landscape). These photos are all stored on external USB drives (backed up in triplicate) so I can see the previews in Lightroom but I can't do the edits unless I plug in the external. My current catalog generally contains just the last 2-3 months of shooting depending on how much that is, with prior months migrated to the external drive (again backed up in triplicate).

    As an aside, I use a free program called FreeFileSync which is great at identifying differences in files between backups and syncing them. I have a primary drive that I use first and then I sync that drive with the other externals.

    I do this because Lightroom will slow down as catalogs get larger and larger since the catalog is where all your edits reside. I back them up regularly (default asks every 2 weeks, I do it every week but will skip if I haven't really shot anything) and keep only the last 4 backups and then back those up as well. If I make changes to older catalogs I'll take a new backup of that one as well, which Lightroom will generally ask for when I exit. Some people like everything in one place, and that's fine. If you're using XMP files then there's a lot less overhead in the catalog so it doesn't slow down as much - but your preview files can get very large.

    I should add that Fred is right about catalog location. Keep all the lrcat files on your main computer's hard drive and only the image files themselves on an external. Those get backed up with everything else on my MacBook, but I also will back them up to the externals with the images as well - just in case.
    Last edited by BackdoorHippie; 07-16-2019 at 01:14 PM.
    Thanks/Like hark Thanks/liked this post
     
    Jake

    The imitator is a poor kind of creature. If the man who paints only the tree, or flower, or other surface he sees before him were an artist, the king of artists would be the photographer. – James McNeill Whistler





Quick Reply Quick Reply

If you are already a member, please login above before posting.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •