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  1. #1
    Senior Member

    Struggling with white balance

    Struggling with white balance
    I feel I am still struggling with White Balance and it is becoming a night mare. Let us leave post processing and using grey cards for white balance. I see professionals nailing their white balance, right at the camera. Even while using Kelvin and trying to match the ambient white balance, neutral, I still feel skin tones are dramatically warm, any leads please....




    Struggling with white balance-dsc_7194.jpg


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    Last edited by Clickr; 02-16-2021 at 02:47 PM.



  2. #2
    Senior Member
    FredKingston's Avatar

    Re: Struggling with white balance

    Without an example of what you're talking about with EXIF data, and without a Grey card as a reference, and without referring to post processing... it's pretty difficult to help you.

    You can adjust the Hue in one or more camera profiles in your camera... but that's a lengthy trial and error process...
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  3. #3
    Senior Member
    nikonpup's Avatar

    Re: Struggling with white balance

    What is the camera white balance setting set on? Pictures examples please.
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    https://www.flickr.com/photos/pups_pleasure/


  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Chucktin's Avatar

    Re: Struggling with white balance

    Don't forget that a camera is not a set of eyes. In a mixed light environment the record a camera makes reports and displays as accurately the manufacturer and your presets allow.
    A grey card is termed "middle grey" because it reflects light in the middle of an approximate of the human visual spectrum. The weasel words are approximate and reflect.
    Also I would use (carefully!) a white reference not a grey one. In very general terms you can ignore shadows except for very high ISO settings where you'll be dealing with electronic signal noise. And you can accept the cameras native middle grey unless you have deliberately modified it.
    But you ignore whites at your peril. Better to have some highlight headroom than lop off the right, white, end of the histogram. You cannot recover what you've lost.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk
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  5. #5
    Senior Member

    Re: Struggling with white balance

    Quote Originally Posted by Clickr View Post
    Even while using Kelvin and trying to match the ambient white balance, neutral, I still feel skin tones are dramatically warm, any leads please....
    Using the auto WB setting in camera had my subjects almost yellow. I now use 5000 for portraits which gets them pretty close.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Needa's Avatar

    Re: Struggling with white balance

    If it is a white balance issue this may help.

    One little trick that works quite well when you are learning how to use your white balance settings is to turn your camera's live view mode on. In this mode, often used for video, you will be able to push the WB button and click through the WB settings or dial in your Kelvin temperature all while seeing the changes happen in real time in your camera.
    From article here. https://fstoppers.com/post-productio...vin-temps-3328

    Never tried it. Just played with it a little just now.
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  7. #7
    Staff
    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    Re: Struggling with white balance

    Are you shooting RAW or jpeg? When shooting RAW, you can easily adjust the white balance during post processing especially if using either Lightroom or Camera RAW. You can choose from Auto, Daylight, Cloudy, etc. or even manually tweak it. If shooting jpeg, you can also adjust the white balance with Lightroom or Camera RAW, but you won't have the options of Daylight, Cloudy, etc. BUT please keep in mind there are camera profiles loaded into your camera such as Standard, Vivid, Neutral, etc. And those will also affect your white balance.

    So even if you are shooting at a specific Kelvin temperature, if your camera is set for Vivid as the Camera Profile, the colors will appear quite vibrant. How is yours set?
    Thanks/Like Clickr Thanks/liked this post
     
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  8. #8
    Senior Member

    Re: Struggling with white balance

    I have attached the image for your reference Bro...


    Quote Originally Posted by FredKingston View Post
    Without an example of what you're talking about with EXIF data, and without a Grey card as a reference, and without referring to post processing... it's pretty difficult to help you.

    You can adjust the Hue in one or more camera profiles in your camera... but that's a lengthy trial and error process...

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    FredKingston's Avatar

    Re: Struggling with white balance

    You need to Download Nikon's Picture Control Utility.

    It allows you to adjust/create your own picture control files for your camera and then upload/replace the ones in your camera.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member

    Re: Struggling with white balance

    I always shoot Raw but still, I feel the skin tones are too warm...I have attached the image for your reference bro.





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