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  1. #11
    Senior Member
    BF Hammer's Avatar

    Re: The perfect wildlife camera?

    Just to muddy the decision a bit, but have you actually tried looking through the viewfinder and tracking a bird with a high-frame-rate shooting burst? I have read complaints from some about there being a substantial lag of the EVF updating to live. Obviously you get blackout with a DSLR mirror motion, but instant optical update when the mirror is down between shots. Maybe the R5 is better than that at Sony. I have not tried either in that respect.


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  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Whiskeyman's Avatar

    Re: The perfect wildlife camera?

    I must be a lousy photographer, because every time I go out with my Nikon gear (D500 & D750 plus assorted lenses) I find out that my results are limited by my capabilities, not my camera's.

    It's a good thing that I shoot for me, and as I am lately realizing, more for the experience of the shoot than the final product. Maybe one of these days I'll get to spend the amount of time toward photography that I really want to.

    As for Nikon, they have disappointed me in their failure to release a firmware update to allow CFExpress card use in their cameras with XQD slots, but that's about all.

    WM
    Last edited by Whiskeyman; 10-12-2020 at 11:32 PM.
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    "If you think that things can't get any worse, you've never been in the military." - Anonymous

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    BF Hammer's Avatar

    Re: The perfect wildlife camera?

    @Whiskeyman : The original author mentions he is selling his photos, and therefore is a professional. Every missed photo is dollars lost in the pocket, so I cannot dismiss his desire to help himself by buying new gear if it truly works out.

    But in my amateur opinion, I question if the lag you get with an EVF is something that everybody can overcome when photographing fast-moving birds (or fast moving subjects in sports for that matter). I personally would have to try one in my hands for a couple of weeks to find out. Rent some gear first before committing is my thought, especially if you need to pay bills with it.

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Woodyg3's Avatar

    Re: The perfect wildlife camera?

    Hey, Chris. Since I first saw this thread and replied, I have been reading and seeing more about the R5. It looks like this camera is the real deal, for sure. Animal eye autofocus is pretty much any nature photographer's dream, and it looks like it really works well on the R5.
    Thanks/Like [email protected] Thanks/liked this post
     
    Woody Green

    Clear Eyes, Full Hearts, Can't Lose

    D500, D7200, D7100, D70

  5. #15
    Senior Member

    Re: The perfect wildlife camera?

    The perfect wildlife camera?
    Quote Originally Posted by Woodyg3 View Post
    Hey, Chris. Since I first saw this thread and replied, I have been reading and seeing more about the R5. It looks like this camera is the real deal, for sure. Animal eye autofocus is pretty much any nature photographer's dream, and it looks like it really works well on the R5.
    This video really got me thinking about it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vyq304j4wE&t=925s
    Nikon D500, D7200 Sigma 11-20 Pro f/2.8. Nikkor 18-140 VR. Sigma 150-600 Contemporary
    Nikkor 200-400mm VR1 f/4
    My Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  6. #16
    Senior Member

    Re: The perfect wildlife camera?

    I appreciate everyone's comments and points of view.
    For me, a camera is a tool. I spent 30 years in different aspects of construction and learned a valuable lesson. You can do things with less than the best or perfect tool for the job but, always be open to new and better tools to get the job done better.
    Higher frame rate means more chances to catch that perfectly timed shot. Better autofocus means hopefully the shot is sharp.
    The Canon R5 seems like a new mirrorless D850 with faster frame rate and better autofocus...I'd be an idiot not to consider it.
    Thanks/Like Woodyg3 Thanks/liked this post
     
    Nikon D500, D7200 Sigma 11-20 Pro f/2.8. Nikkor 18-140 VR. Sigma 150-600 Contemporary
    Nikkor 200-400mm VR1 f/4
    My Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Whiskeyman's Avatar

    Re: The perfect wildlife camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by Woodyg3 View Post
    Hey, Chris. Since I first saw this thread and replied, I have been reading and seeing more about the R5. It looks like this camera is the real deal, for sure. Animal eye autofocus is pretty much any nature photographer's dream, and it looks like it really works well on the R5.
    I know a pro who does tours, and his photos are what attract clients to his business, and he is constantly changing systems. When I first met him, he shot Canon, then he switched to Nikon and got rid of his Canon gear. After a while, he purchased some Sony mirrorless gear, while keeping his Nikon gear. He wasn't pleased with the Sony, so he sold it and went back to Nikon full time. Now that the Canon R5 and R6 are released, he abandoned his Nikon gear completely after trying the R5 and sold all of his Nikon gear. Now, he's all in with Canon for the time being, and has added an R6 to his toolbox. The photos he's gotten with them back up his assertion that they're now the best cameras for what he does; the photos he shares are really great. However, I'm sure that he'll change again if and when he sees a better system than the R5/R6/Canon come along.

    The big factor in his success, though, is his skillset as a photographer: he gets great shots no matter what gear he's shooting. He is also always out shooting birds and knows his subjects, and his gear, very well.

    WM
    Thanks/Like [email protected], Woodyg3 Thanks/liked this post
     
    "If you think that things can't get any worse, you've never been in the military." - Anonymous

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Whiskeyman's Avatar

    Re: The perfect wildlife camera?

    Quote Originally Posted by BF Hammer View Post
    @Whiskeyman : The original author mentions he is selling his photos, and therefore is a professional. Every missed photo is dollars lost in the pocket, so I cannot dismiss his desire to help himself by buying new gear if it truly works out.

    But in my amateur opinion, I question if the lag you get with an EVF is something that everybody can overcome when photographing fast-moving birds (or fast moving subjects in sports for that matter). I personally would have to try one in my hands for a couple of weeks to find out. Rent some gear first before committing is my thought, especially if you need to pay bills with it.
    I don't mean to begrudge his decision at all, but am trying to reinforce the fact that better equipment won't always make someone a better photographer, as Jake (BackdoorArts) stated earlier in this thread.

    As far as your question about EVF display lag, I'm going to ask the fellow that has the R5/R6 combo what he feels about it. I do know that he doesn't seem to have any issues tracking BIFs with either the R5 or the R6. Then again, he's really good at tracking moving birds. After I hear back from him, I'll post his opinion here.

    WM
    Thanks/Like Woodyg3 Thanks/liked this post
     
    "If you think that things can't get any worse, you've never been in the military." - Anonymous

  9. #19
    Senior Member

    Re: The perfect wildlife camera?

    If you think finding a 500mm F5.6 PF is hard, try finding an R5. Seriously, I know someone who traded in all their Nikon gear for one and has been cameraless for over 2 months.

    Again, as for me, I found the greatest upgrade I've made for birds is moving to primes. Focus is quicker and more accurate, OOF areas are much more pleasing, and with PF glass I can handhold all day.

    The perfect wildlife camera?-j54_0726-edit-copy.jpg

    The perfect wildlife camera?-j55_7255-edit-edit-copy.jpg

    The perfect wildlife camera?-j55_9725-edit-edit-2-copy.jpg

    The perfect wildlife camera?-d50_5897-edit-copy.jpg

    The perfect wildlife camera?-d53_1685-edit-edit-copy.jpg

    The perfect wildlife camera?-d53_2643-edit-copy.jpg

    The perfect wildlife camera?-d53_2670-edit-copy.jpg
    Thanks/Like [email protected], Woodyg3, hark Thanks/liked this post
     
    Jake
    (formerly backdoorhippie)

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Woodyg3's Avatar

    Re: The perfect wildlife camera?

    The perfect wildlife camera?
    Quote Originally Posted by BackdoorArts View Post
    Again, as for me, I found the greatest upgrade I've made for birds is moving to primes. Focus is quicker and more accurate, OOF areas are much more pleasing, and with PF glass I can handhold all day.

    The perfect wildlife camera?-j54_0726-edit-copy.jpg

    The perfect wildlife camera?-j55_7255-edit-edit-copy.jpg

    The perfect wildlife camera?-j55_9725-edit-edit-2-copy.jpg

    The perfect wildlife camera?-d50_5897-edit-copy.jpg

    The perfect wildlife camera?-d53_1685-edit-edit-copy.jpg

    The perfect wildlife camera?-d53_2643-edit-copy.jpg
    You make a good point, Jake. Glass is just as important, and in many ways the most important consideration. Being a retired teacher, I don't exactly have a big ol' pile of money to play with. It has occurred to me that saving up for the 500 pf and continuing to use the D500 would likely be the best affordable upgrade I could make.

    Nice shots, especially the hawk.
    Thanks/Like BackdoorArts Thanks/liked this post
     
    Woody Green

    Clear Eyes, Full Hearts, Can't Lose

    D500, D7200, D7100, D70





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