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  1. #1
    Senior Member

    How to shoot this kind of photo?

    How to shoot this kind of photo?
    I am wondering if it is possible to shoot a photo like one below (from National Geographic) by a regular DSLR camera? What kind of settings are used? I am thinking of maybe long exposure... Appreciate verification and tips.

    How to shoot this kind of photo?-lapse.jpg


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  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Challenge Team
    cwgrizz's Avatar

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    I'm thinking it is two shots stacked on top of each other using PP software.
    Walt

    D750; D7100; D5300;
    18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 G II VR; AF-S VR 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G IF-ED; AF-S 85mm f1.8; Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 (IF) DX II; 200-500mm f5.6E ED VR; AF-S VR 24-120mm f/4G ED; TC14E II



  3. #3
    Senior Member

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    Ah, stacked images! Make sense, but out of my head at first. I can see one head's hair briefly cover another head's face. But can't figure out why part of the bookcase' (right) edge shows up in one head's face? I don't use and know PP though. Does Darktable or Gimp do image stacking? Sure like to learn. Thanks, Walt.

  4. #4
    Senior Member

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    There are certainly ways to create this in-camera using double exposure mode, but based on the lack of movement in whatever the kid is watching I suspect it's done in post.

    You could also do it in single exposure mode with a long exposure in 2 ways, the first would have shown movement in the head (single, constant exposure), the other would require you to open the shutter with the lens covered, lift the cover, close it, have the person move, open it again, and close the shutter. In the latter method it helps to have a dark space and illuminate it twice with a flash. This is obviously lit naturally so it's not that.
    Jake
    (formerly backdoorhippie)

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Horoscope Fish's Avatar

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    Quote Originally Posted by blackstar View Post
    I am wondering if it is possible to shoot a photo like one below (from National Geographic) by a regular DSLR camera? What kind of settings are used? I am thinking of maybe long exposure... Appreciate verification and tips.

    How to shoot this kind of photo?-lapse.jpg
    I'm not seeing anything in that image that couldn't be done with a single, long exposure (say, ten seconds or so; maybe less) and routine processing. Exposure details would depend on the ambient lighting.

    Edit: I take that back. Having looked at the image on my computer (instead of my phone) it's clearly a double-exposure.
    Last edited by Horoscope Fish; 05-09-2020 at 03:10 PM.
    ~ Paul
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  6. #6
    Senior Member
    FredKingston's Avatar

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    Looks like a plain ole in-camera double exposure from a tripod and the only thing that moved was the woman turned her head.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Nikonewbie's Avatar

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    double exposure is my guess as well

  8. #8
    Senior Member

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    How to shoot this kind of photo?
    Ok, "double-exposure in camera" is. So basically you take two individual shots and then use image overlay in retouch menu to blend. The example below (from slrlounge) shows a very impressive and interesting 2-exp result with the settings: “Silhouette Image”: 24mm, ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/1000 sec.; “Scenery Image”: 24mm, ISO 800, f/2.2, 1/2500 sec.
    How to shoot this kind of photo?-double-exposure-s.jpeg

    Questions (not addressed in the article): the first image (the couple) stated as "silhouette" is only kind of partial sil (upper body). How to make that in-camera?

    It looks like there are more than 2 images blended. Am I losing my vision?

    How to figure which image overlay which? According to the settings, 1st image is the couple (partially sil) standing on a prairie and 2nd is the scene of lake and mountain? And the tiny couple inside of the guy came from where? The 1st image will be on top of the 2nd or vice-versa?

    Pardon me if this discussion goes too far. But always thanks for the responses.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    The silhouette image is just 2 images stacked on top of each other. I don't think you would be able to get that exact result in camera. It can easily be done in post using 2 layers. Put the mountains as the background and stack the silhouette on top. Then you can decrease the opacity of the top layer so that the mountains show through. After that, you can do some selective masking to increase the visibility of the bottom layer where you want it to show through more. It is pretty easy to do in post.

    The small couple you are seeing is part of the mountain/water image. The same couple is standing on rocks in the background image, but they show through the top image because the top layer visibility has been reduced/masked. Too artsy and fidgety for my taste, but that kind of image is good practice for learning masking and layer opacity.
    Last edited by Dawg Pics; 05-10-2020 at 05:21 AM. Reason: Can't seem to type today
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100
    Sigma 150-600mm DG Contemporary, Sigma 50-150mm f2.8, Tamron 28-75mm f2.8,
    Nikkor Nifty-Fifty.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    There is probably some exposure/contrast/level adjustments as well to wash out some of the image.
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100
    Sigma 150-600mm DG Contemporary, Sigma 50-150mm f2.8, Tamron 28-75mm f2.8,
    Nikkor Nifty-Fifty.





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