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  1. #11
    Senior Member

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    Thanks, Dawg.

    I assume all the processing and adjustments you indicated are done post-double exp and overlay, not in-camera.

    Now the "artsy and fidgety" taste of the photo, I believe, is done purposely as it's probably part of a wedding assignment. I was just interested in the double-exp and overlay effects.


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  2. #12
    Senior Member

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    How to shoot this kind of photo?
    Another possibility: single-exposure (a matter of calculating and setting exp time)
    How to shoot this kind of photo?-2020-05-10-10.04.10-s.jpeg

    How to shoot this kind of photo?-2020-05-10-10.05.10-s.jpeg

    How to shoot this kind of photo?-2020-05-10-10.06.09-s.jpeg

    How to shoot this kind of photo?-2020-05-10-10.06.43-s.jpeg

    How to shoot this kind of photo?-2020-05-10-10.07.20-s.jpeg

    How to shoot this kind of photo?-2020-05-10-10.08.38-s.jpeg

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    Quote Originally Posted by blackstar View Post
    Thanks, Dawg.

    I assume all the processing and adjustments you indicated are done post-double exp and overlay, not in-camera.

    Now the "artsy and fidgety" taste of the photo, I believe, is done purposely as it's probably part of a wedding assignment. I was just interested in the double-exp and overlay effects.
    Probably done in post using 2 separate images stacked and not a double exposure considering how the couple from the scenery image was lined up inside the silhouette and some other specifics I see. Just my guess, though. I agree, probably engagement photo or something like that. The other image you posted with the lady in front of the bookcase looks like an in-camera double exposure to me.

    I have only used the double exposure function in my D300 a couple of times. I found it looked odd because the second image looked transparent, which is necessary to show both images. It worked for my benefit because I was using the images on a website for a haunted house, and it added to the ghost-like appearance we were going for.

    Anyway, looks like you are trying to learn new things, and that is always satisfying. Continue to have fun with it.
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100
    Sigma 150-600mm DG Contemporary, Sigma 50-150mm f2.8, Tamron 28-75mm f2.8,
    Nikkor Nifty-Fifty.

  4. #14
    Senior Member

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    Hi Dawg,

    I think the couple image was first done by double-exp and in-camera image overlay, then some sort of post-pro because it came from the examples of the author's specific double-exp and image overlay lesson. By the way, transparency and opaque of any layer (image) can be adjusted in the overlay process.

    Yeah, I'm trying to learn more, and yet come with many stumblings, e.g., try using Gimp's Startrail-plugin to make image stacking with regular tri-exp photos for a very disappointing outcome (fine result from night star photos though).
    Thanks/Like Dawg Pics Thanks/liked this post
     

  5. #15
    Senior Member

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dawg Pics View Post
    I have only used the double exposure function in my D300 a couple of times. I found it looked odd because the second image looked transparent, which is necessary to show both images. It worked for my benefit because I was using the images on a website for a haunted house, and it added to the ghost-like appearance we were going for.
    Some cameras will allow you to see the multiple exposure overlay while it's happening, so lining things up is far easier (I have a Sony that I bought an app for that allows you to do it), including selecting a choice of blend modes.

    That said, both of these examples have strong evidence for being done in post, though if someone has played with it enough then the wedding shot is indeed doable.
    Thanks/Like Dawg Pics Thanks/liked this post
     
    Jake
    (formerly backdoorhippie)

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    Quote Originally Posted by BackdoorArts View Post
    Some cameras will allow you to see the multiple exposure overlay while it's happening, so lining things up is far easier (I have a Sony that I bought an app for that allows you to do it), including selecting a choice of blend modes.

    That said, both of these examples have strong evidence for being done in post, though if someone has played with it enough then the wedding shot is indeed doable.
    I found the article, and according to the author, it is just in-camera overlay using a Nikon D750. However, that doesn't mean they didn't do a bunch of stuff in post as well. If it is just Nikon's overlay, then it is a crap-shoot to get 2 images that line up the way you hope. The app for your Sony sounds better since you can see what you are doing.
    Last edited by Dawg Pics; 05-12-2020 at 02:24 AM.
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100
    Sigma 150-600mm DG Contemporary, Sigma 50-150mm f2.8, Tamron 28-75mm f2.8,
    Nikkor Nifty-Fifty.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    @blackstar

    I looked at the article. I agree that there should have been a tutorial on the top image since it is the 'attention grabber' for the article.
    To answer your questions. It is 2 images overlayed, but there is no way (that I can tell) to know which image was chosen first. In all of the examples from the author, the subject image was chosen first, then a background.

    The silhouette is a full-body image of a couple standing in a field, and it is blended with a water/rocky background. So you see their legs and the field flowers blended into the water of the scenery shot. The reflection line of the scenery shot kind of cuts the subject in half so their upper body is on top of the rocky background. The little couple you see is just part of the scenery image. Then probably further editing afterward, like you said. It is a confusing image because it is so busy.

    I don't know that it makes a difference which one you choose first since you can change each to your liking before saving. I hope that was the answers you were looking for.

    Here is an article by Nikon that states pretty much the same thing as the article did but has a couple more examples for you to look at. https://www.nikonusa.com/en/learn-an...in-camera.html
    Last edited by Dawg Pics; 05-12-2020 at 03:10 AM.
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100
    Sigma 150-600mm DG Contemporary, Sigma 50-150mm f2.8, Tamron 28-75mm f2.8,
    Nikkor Nifty-Fifty.

  8. #18
    Senior Member

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    Hey, Dawg. I received a notification about your reply to this thread at about 5:23 PM. Yet when I went to the link, your post was not there. In the notification, you asked a question about images on the card that can be used for double-exp in-camera. I reckon you have got the answer, so you deleted the post. I kind of remember that you need RAW files on the card to do image overlay. Maybe you can confirm. Sound fun! I surely plan to experiment a bit.

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    @blackstar. Yes, I deleted because I figured it out. Then I made a couple of edits and deleted, so I posted several times. I tend to do that after reading my posts. Sorry about that.

    Yes, I read that you need RAW images to do the overlay.

    I do that too. I just experiment to see how things come out. I remember better that way rather than reading stuff. It is how my brain works (or doesn't depending on how you look at it. )
    Last edited by Dawg Pics; 05-12-2020 at 03:28 AM.
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100
    Sigma 150-600mm DG Contemporary, Sigma 50-150mm f2.8, Tamron 28-75mm f2.8,
    Nikkor Nifty-Fifty.

  10. #20
    Senior Member

    Re: How to shoot this kind of photo?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dawg Pics View Post
    I found the article, and according to the author, it is just in-camera overlay using a Nikon D750. However, that doesn't mean they didn't do a bunch of stuff in post as well. If it is just Nikon's overlay, then it is a crap-shoot to get 2 images that line up the way you hope. The app for your Sony sounds better since you can see what you are doing.
    Things become less and less a crap-shoot the more times you do them. In a posed situation like this you can scout and do practice shots with an assistant, use a tripod or pair of tripods to guarantee proper alignment - all those things that planning makes "easy", and practice makes perfect.
    Thanks/Like Dawg Pics Thanks/liked this post
    Best Answers FredKingston voted best answer for this post
     
    Jake
    (formerly backdoorhippie)





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