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  1. #1
    Junior Member

    Light stars

    Hi, everyone, I'm a new member, and long-time Nikon user. Currently use a D800E with a 24 - 85 lens, with a D7000 back-up body with a 16 - 85 mm lens. I also use a D5200 for those times I want to get close to the ground using the swiveling screen.
    I am constantly disappointed with the lenses I use not producing good light stars. I have a 3rd party Tokina lens that really does produce good stars.
    I would really appreciate any feedback that would help me with my Nikon lenses.


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  2. #2
    Staff
    Super Mod
    Marilynne's Avatar

    Re: Light stars

    Welcome!

    You may want to open another thread with your question.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Bikerbrent's Avatar

    Re: Light stars

    Welcome aboard. Enjoy the ride.
    We look forward to seeing more posts and samples of your work.
    Brent: Poway, CA
    D7200, D200, F100
    Tokina 12-24mm
    Nikon 18-200mm
    Tokina 28-70mm f2.6-2.8
    Nikon 80-200mm f2.8
    Sigma 150-600mm
    Nikon 50 AF f1.8
    Tokina 100mm f2.8 Macro
    Nikon SB800

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Dangerspouse's Avatar

    Re: Light stars

    Hey there, welcome! And yeah - start a seperate thread for your question. You'll get more answers that way

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Bengan's Avatar

    Re: Light stars

    Welcome to the forum
    Bengt - D810; D7200
    Tamron 24-70/2.8 G2; Sigma 14-24/2.8
    Sigma 150-600 C; Sigma 105/2.8 Macro
    Pentax K-1, K-3, Spotmatic, ME, K-2; Rolleiflex

  6. #6
    Staff
    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    Re: Light stars

    Hi and welcome, Tony. I've never done astrophotography, but what I've learned from this forum is faster lenses such as f/1.4 to f/2.8 work better. Because they are faster, more light hits the sensor than variable zoom lenses offer. And when more light hits the sensor, the stars show up more prominently. If you leave your shutter open too long, you will create star trails. That's why faster lenses work better. And usually wider focal lengths such as 14mm (on FX at least) seem to be pretty popular.

    You might want to read through this thread and notice the lenses or focal lengths used. It might help narrow down choices for lenses. Some people have had terrific images with a Rokinon 14mm lens. It's manual focus - but you should be focusing manually to get the best results. With any lens, you'd want to find the best infinity focusing spot on the lens. Be sure to read post #4 in the thread below which explains how.

    https://nikonites.com/low-light-and-...#axzz5rtmuX7RW
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2019 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Needa's Avatar

    Re: Light stars

    Tony, welcome!

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Needa's Avatar

    Re: Light stars

    Quote Originally Posted by hark View Post
    Hi and welcome, Tony. I've never done astrophotography, but what I've learned from this forum is faster lenses such as f/1.4 to f/2.8 work better. Because they are faster, more light hits the sensor than variable zoom lenses offer. And when more light hits the sensor, the stars show up more prominently. If you leave your shutter open too long, you will create star trails. That's why faster lenses work better. And usually wider focal lengths such as 14mm (on FX at least) seem to be pretty popular.

    You might want to read through this thread and notice the lenses or focal lengths used. It might help narrow down choices for lenses. Some people have had terrific images with a Rokinon 14mm lens. It's manual focus - but you should be focusing manually to get the best results. With any lens, you'd want to find the best infinity focusing spot on the lens. Be sure to read post #4 in the thread below which explains how.

    https://nikonites.com/low-light-and-...#axzz5rtmuX7RW
    Not sure this is what the OP is looking for. Thought he might be looking for information on producing the star like appearance around a light source that you get using a small aperture. Maybe he will stop by and let us know.
    Last edited by Needa; 06-28-2019 at 03:00 PM. Reason: correction

  9. #9
    Senior Member

    Re: Light stars

    Welcome to the forum!
    D810; D7200; AF-S 14-24mm f/2.8G ED; AF-S 24-120mm f/4G ED VR; Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 Sport; Sigma 2X Teleconverter;
    AF-S 50mm f/1.8G; AF-S 85mm f/1.8G - Old non-AF; 105mm f/2.5; 28mm f/2.8 - Godox V860II & AD200

  10. #10
    Staff
    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    Re: Light stars

    Quote Originally Posted by Needa View Post
    Not sure this is what the OP is looking for. Thought he might be looking for information on producing the star like appearance around a light source that you get using a small aperture. Maybe he will stop by and let us know.
    Ahh...I see what you're saying. Here I assumed he meant stars in the sky not creating stars from light sources.

    I'm not entirely sure, but I think part of it has to do with how the aperture blades are shaped. Some older lenses tended to be very good due to their designs, but when newer designs changed the shapes of the aperture blades, it became hit and miss. Using a wide angle lens and stopping down to the smallest aperture will show whether or not a lens can produce decent results. My Nikon 18-35 f/3.5-4.5G does a great job with this. Keeping the focal length wide and stopping down is the best way to tell. Telephoto lenses don't work nearly as well as wide angle primes or zooms.
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2019 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci







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