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  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Yan Lauzon's Avatar

    Re: Astrophotography gear?

    Up north in my province isn't so bad!

    Last year I went to Australia (the trip that triggered me getting geared up)
    One of the things I wanted a good camera for, was taking the night sky. They rarely have clouds, and don't have the same stars as us in the northern hemisphere. I am sad I didn't manage to shoot the Southern cross while I was there... I'll have to go back when I know how to!

    But for now, up north and during travels will be it!


    › See More: Astrophotography gear?



  2. #12
    Senior Member
    hark's Avatar

    Re: Astrophotography gear?

    Quote Originally Posted by Moab Man View Post
    @hark

    14mm Rokinon
    Thanks! Here I was guessing a 16mm. Glad to hear it was a 14mm since I have that focal length.

    Quote Originally Posted by Moab Man View Post
    Here is a link that is roughly accurate to where you can find dark sky: DarkSiteFinder.com - Light Pollution Map
    I had to laugh when I looked at the map. The red-to-white area between Philadelphia and New York is where I live! There isn't any dark sky anywhere around here. Sometimes the light pollution here is extremely visible to the naked eye.

    Thanks for the info!
    Thanks/Like Yan Lauzon, Moab Man Thanks/liked this post
     
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and
    My 2018 Thread
    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Moab Man's Avatar

    Re: Astrophotography gear?

    Solar photography

    Two options, a dedicated solar filter or a solar film cap for your lens. The key is to buy from reputable sources. There was a lot of recalls on solar glasses because of look alike films were being used. If you use a solar film cap then I always suggest a couple pieces of tape securing it to the body for extra good measure.

    Lens length, as long as you got or can afford.

    I will get into shooting an eclipse on another posting.
    Thanks/Like hark, Yan Lauzon Thanks/liked this post
     
    D5100, D7100, D600, D750, Df
    Lenses: Nikon DX 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 55-300mm, Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD & 200-500mm
    Prime: Nikon 35mm, 50mm, & 85mm f/1.8G, 300mm f/4
    Wide Angle: Tokina AT-X116 Pro DX-II 11-16mm f/2.8, Rokinon f/2.8 14mm (chipped)
    Macro: Nikon 40mm, Tamron 90mm
    ​Flash: Nissin MARK II Di622
    Stuff: Expodisc Neutral & Portrait
    ​Editing: CS6, CC, Nik Tools, Portrait Pro 12, Topaz
    Spyder4Pro
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/122672034@N04/

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Moab Man's Avatar

    Re: Astrophotography gear?

    To get these, can I use my kit 18-55 (at 18mm) or would the aperture be in the way? Would a 50mm 1.8 be any better? Or should I start trying to find a 14mm? Or another wide angle at large aperture? (Im thinking an older one, since it's going to be used manual anyway)
    You are shooting on a crop sensor camera. That mean that a 14mm would give you a field of view equivalent to 21mm. (focal length x 1.5 is what you are seeing the equivalent of on a full frame) So go wide. Tokina has some that are wider and auto focus for crop sensor Nikons. The Rokinon I used is manual.

    The challenge with using your 18-55 lens is that its wide open aperture is I believe 3.5. You want wide. The lenses I'm using are 2.8, it may not seem much, but it really helps. Second would be the focal length. 18x1.5 = 27mm.

    Rokinon (works for both crop and full frame) manual focus
    https://www.amazon.com/Rokinon-Ultra.../dp/B004NNUN02


    Tokina 11-16mm - the filters with it are crap, but you want the lens hood.
    https://www.amazon.com/11-16mm-Acces...mm+f+2.8+nikon

    There was a new Tokina 12-28mm brought out, but it's an f/4 lens from what I can see.

    Of course there are other options, but you want WIDE and ideally f/2.8.
    Thanks/Like hark, Yan Lauzon Thanks/liked this post
     
    D5100, D7100, D600, D750, Df
    Lenses: Nikon DX 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 55-300mm, Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD & 200-500mm
    Prime: Nikon 35mm, 50mm, & 85mm f/1.8G, 300mm f/4
    Wide Angle: Tokina AT-X116 Pro DX-II 11-16mm f/2.8, Rokinon f/2.8 14mm (chipped)
    Macro: Nikon 40mm, Tamron 90mm
    ​Flash: Nissin MARK II Di622
    Stuff: Expodisc Neutral & Portrait
    ​Editing: CS6, CC, Nik Tools, Portrait Pro 12, Topaz
    Spyder4Pro
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/122672034@N04/

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    hark's Avatar

    Re: Astrophotography gear?

    Quote Originally Posted by Moab Man View Post
    Solar photography

    Two options, a dedicated solar filter or a solar film cap for your lens. The key is to buy from reputable sources. There was a lot of recalls on solar glasses because of look alike films were being used. If you use a solar film cap then I always suggest a couple pieces of tape securing it to the body for extra good measure.

    Lens length, as long as you got or can afford.

    I will get into shooting an eclipse on another posting.
    Quote Originally Posted by Moab Man View Post
    You are shooting on a crop sensor camera. That mean that a 14mm would give you a field of view equivalent to 21mm. (focal length x 1.5 is what you are seeing the equivalent of on a full frame) So go wide. Tokina has some that are wider and auto focus for crop sensor Nikons. The Rokinon I used is manual.

    The challenge with using your 18-55 lens is that its wide open aperture is I believe 3.5. You want wide. The lenses I'm using are 2.8, it may not seem much, but it really helps. Second would be the focal length. 18x1.5 = 27mm.

    Rokinon (works for both crop and full frame) manual focus
    https://www.amazon.com/Rokinon-Ultra.../dp/B004NNUN02


    Tokina 11-16mm - the filters with it are crap, but you want the lens hood.
    https://www.amazon.com/11-16mm-Acces...mm+f+2.8+nikon

    There was a new Tokina 12-28mm brought out, but it's an f/4 lens from what I can see.

    Of course there are other options, but you want WIDE and ideally f/2.8.
    George, just so Yan Lauzon understands the why behind the focal length selections, the widest possible (but not a fisheye) is to capture the entire Milky Way in one shot, yes? Anything longer might cut off part of it, wouldn't it?

    And for the solar images, the longest telephoto lens possible is to keep from having to crop away too much of the image?

    What type of solar filter did you use for your sun photos? For some reason, I keep thinking of the Marumi DHG ND-100000 Solid Neutral Density 5.0 Solar Eclipse Filter (16.5 Stops). There is also one made by Hoya, but I thought I read an article on the Marumi--can't remember who wrote it--possibly PetaPixel or F/Stoppers. Do you know anything about this filter? At some point, I might get one. The Hoya doesn't have any reviews which makes be skeptical to get it (simply don't want to be guinea pig).

    Marumi Solar Filter: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...se_filter.html

    Hoya Solar Filter: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...ar_filter.html
    Thanks/Like Yan Lauzon Thanks/liked this post
     
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and
    My 2018 Thread
    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Moab Man's Avatar

    Re: Astrophotography gear?

    Quote Originally Posted by hark View Post
    George, just so Yan Lauzon understands the why behind the focal length selections, the widest possible (but not a fisheye) is to capture the entire Milky Way in one shot, yes? Anything longer might cut off part of it, wouldn't it?
    Yes, you are correct. To capture it all in one shot, but no fish-eyes. Multiple shots can be done to photograph the milky way, but that is a whole other topic.


    Quote Originally Posted by hark View Post
    And for the solar images, the longest telephoto lens possible is to keep from having to crop away too much of the image?
    Exactly. The more you crop down and then fit the image to what you want the more you're stretching pixels.


    Quote Originally Posted by hark View Post
    What type of solar filter did you use for your sun photos? For some reason, I keep thinking of the Marumi DHG ND-100000 Solid Neutral Density 5.0 Solar Eclipse Filter (16.5 Stops). There is also one made by Hoya, but I thought I read an article on the Marumi--can't remember who wrote it--possibly PetaPixel or F/Stoppers. Do you know anything about this filter? At some point, I might get one. The Hoya doesn't have any reviews which makes be skeptical to get it (simply don't want to be guinea pig).

    Marumi Solar Filter: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...se_filter.html

    Hoya Solar Filter: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...ar_filter.html

    I went with solar filmed that I sandwiched between cardboard (hole cut out in the cardboards) and made a boot attached to the sandwich that slid over the end of my lens. My reasoning is that I don't do much solar photography and film is cheaper and the better deal for how rarely I do it.


    Thank you for jumping in. When we just know something we don't always explain as much as we could or maybe should because we just don't think about it.
    Last edited by Moab Man; 03-03-2018 at 09:38 PM.
    Thanks/Like Yan Lauzon, hark Thanks/liked this post
     
    D5100, D7100, D600, D750, Df
    Lenses: Nikon DX 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 55-300mm, Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD & 200-500mm
    Prime: Nikon 35mm, 50mm, & 85mm f/1.8G, 300mm f/4
    Wide Angle: Tokina AT-X116 Pro DX-II 11-16mm f/2.8, Rokinon f/2.8 14mm (chipped)
    Macro: Nikon 40mm, Tamron 90mm
    ​Flash: Nissin MARK II Di622
    Stuff: Expodisc Neutral & Portrait
    ​Editing: CS6, CC, Nik Tools, Portrait Pro 12, Topaz
    Spyder4Pro
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/122672034@N04/

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Kevin H's Avatar

    Re: Astrophotography gear?

    @Moab Man I'll be watching this thread it's something I'm interested in too not sure when yet but I'll try to get to Algonquin Park for some
    Thanks/Like Moab Man Thanks/liked this post
     
    Nikon D7200
    Nikon D7100 (she's Dead)
    Nikon D5100
    Nikon 300 f4
    Nikon 55-300
    Nikon 18-105
    Nikon 35mm f1.8 DX
    Tamron 90 f2.8 macro
    Sigma 10-20 f3.5
    Sigma 150-500

    My Flickr

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Yan Lauzon's Avatar

    Re: Astrophotography gear?

    Quote Originally Posted by hark View Post
    the widest possible (but not a fisheye)
    Thanks for the emphasis on no fisheye.. A lot of the wide ones I saw are fisheye


    So, ideally, I'd want as wide as or wider than my kit but with my prime's aperture...

    At what wideness would I start losing part of the milky-way, considering I have a crop sensor?

    I assume a 35mm is too narrow, but would ~22mm go well? Just to help in my lens hunting

    On the other side, is a unique lens good for both moon and sun (with added filters) or are we talking something different?

    Thanks a lot guys for all the information!!

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Yan Lauzon's Avatar

    Re: Astrophotography gear?

    And, please... Just "Yan"

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    hark's Avatar

    Re: Astrophotography gear?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yan Lauzon View Post
    Thanks for the emphasis on no fisheye.. A lot of the wide ones I saw are fisheye


    So, ideally, I'd want as wide as or wider than my kit but with my prime's aperture...

    At what wideness would I start losing part of the milky-way, considering I have a crop sensor?

    I assume a 35mm is too narrow, but would ~22mm go well? Just to help in my lens hunting

    On the other side, is a unique lens good for both moon and sun (with added filters) or are we talking something different?

    Thanks a lot guys for all the information!!
    You want to go as wide as possible with as large an aperture as possible. Moab Man gave you some options when he said:

    Quote Originally Posted by Moab Man View Post
    You are shooting on a crop sensor camera. That mean that a 14mm would give you a field of view equivalent to 21mm. (focal length x 1.5 is what you are seeing the equivalent of on a full frame) So go wide. Tokina has some that are wider and auto focus for crop sensor Nikons. The Rokinon I used is manual.

    The challenge with using your 18-55 lens is that its wide open aperture is I believe 3.5. You want wide. The lenses I'm using are 2.8, it may not seem much, but it really helps. Second would be the focal length. 18x1.5 = 27mm.

    Rokinon (works for both crop and full frame) manual focus
    https://www.amazon.com/Rokinon-Ultra.../dp/B004NNUN02


    Tokina 11-16mm - the filters with it are crap, but you want the lens hood.
    https://www.amazon.com/11-16mm-Acces...mm+f+2.8+nikon

    There was a new Tokina 12-28mm brought out, but it's an f/4 lens from what I can see.

    Of course there are other options, but you want WIDE and ideally f/2.8.
    So there are around 3 options for you which would work best.

    1. A 14mm f/2.8 prime such as the Rokinon.
    2. An ultra wide angle zoom that isn't as fast such as the Tokina 12mm-28mm f/4 that Moab Man mentioned above.
    3. A fixed aperture ultra wide zoom such as the one Moab Man linked in his quote.

    You can get by with less expensive alternatives, but you will sacrifice something in the process. Having a wide a lens as possible with as fast an aperture as possible is key for the Milky Way shots.

    You asked about @22mm. The problem is you are using a DX body so the equivalent focal length when 20mm is mounted on an FX body is at least 30mm on DX. You will cut off part of the Milky Way. That's the sacrifice you will get if you don't choose a lens that is wide enough.

    Quote Originally Posted by Moab Man View Post
    Thank you for jumping in. When we just know something we don't always explain as much as we could or maybe should because we just don't think about it.
    I apologize if I stepped on your toes, George! I certainly hadn't meant to--I have a teaching degree (music) so my head just goes to explaining the why simply for the learning--it isn't anything I consciously think of when I start to type a response. I have a great deal of respect for your ability and your work. You and Scott Murray are the only two I can think of off hand who have shared Milky Way images, but Scott hasn't been around much for quite a while. So Yan, please try to understand everything Moab Man is saying here and weigh your options carefully.

    @Moab Man one more thing...can you please explain to Yan as to why an f/2.8 lens is preferred over f/3.5? Since I've never taken any long exposures like these require, it would help him make an informed decision. If he chooses to go with some type of wide lens that isn't as fast as an f/2.8 lens, he will get an idea of what he is sacrificing. Thanks!
    Thanks/Like Yan Lauzon, Moab Man Thanks/liked this post
     
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and
    My 2018 Thread
    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci







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