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  1. #2171
    Senior Member

    Re: Post your Insect shots

    Post your Insect shots
    Post your Insect shots-nik_9080.jpg


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  2. #2172
    Senior Member
    wev's Avatar

    Re: Post your Insect shots

    Post your Insect shots
    Robber fly -- one of my favorites

    Post your Insect shots-rbberfly.jpg
    Thanks/Like Woodyg3, Dangerspouse, Robin W, Dawg Pics Thanks/liked this post
     
    wev

    d500
    d5300 x 2
    Tamron 150-600 G2/5-6.3, Tamron 18-400mm/3.5-6.3, Tamron 90mm/2.8 macro
    Nikon 18-55mm/3.6-5.6, Nikon 55-200mm/4-5.6
    Nikon 35mm/1.8, Nikon 50mm/1.8
    Vanguard Alta Pro 263AT tripod, CP324 monopod
    SBH 100 ball head, PH 32 pan head
    SB-700 Speedlight

  3. #2173
    Happy to be Canadian
    Super Mod
    Marcel's Avatar

    Re: Post your Insect shots

    With Df, 28-300 + 12mm extension tube.

    Post your Insect shots-dsc_8901.jpg
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    I'm beginning to see the LIGHT!
    Please visit my Gallery and my Flickr Gallery

  4. #2174
    Senior Member
    wev's Avatar

    Re: Post your Insect shots

    Post your Insect shots
    Post your Insect shots-mantis2.jpg
    Thanks/Like Robin W Thanks/liked this post
     
    wev

    d500
    d5300 x 2
    Tamron 150-600 G2/5-6.3, Tamron 18-400mm/3.5-6.3, Tamron 90mm/2.8 macro
    Nikon 18-55mm/3.6-5.6, Nikon 55-200mm/4-5.6
    Nikon 35mm/1.8, Nikon 50mm/1.8
    Vanguard Alta Pro 263AT tripod, CP324 monopod
    SBH 100 ball head, PH 32 pan head
    SB-700 Speedlight

  5. #2175
    Senior Member
    wev's Avatar

    Re: Post your Insect shots

    Post your Insect shots
    So can you do this????

    Post your Insect shots-mantis4.jpg
    Thanks/Like Robin W, Woodyg3 Thanks/liked this post
     
    wev

    d500
    d5300 x 2
    Tamron 150-600 G2/5-6.3, Tamron 18-400mm/3.5-6.3, Tamron 90mm/2.8 macro
    Nikon 18-55mm/3.6-5.6, Nikon 55-200mm/4-5.6
    Nikon 35mm/1.8, Nikon 50mm/1.8
    Vanguard Alta Pro 263AT tripod, CP324 monopod
    SBH 100 ball head, PH 32 pan head
    SB-700 Speedlight

  6. #2176
    Senior Member
    wev's Avatar

    Re: Post your Insect shots

    Post your Insect shots
    Post your Insect shots-fly.jpg
    wev

    d500
    d5300 x 2
    Tamron 150-600 G2/5-6.3, Tamron 18-400mm/3.5-6.3, Tamron 90mm/2.8 macro
    Nikon 18-55mm/3.6-5.6, Nikon 55-200mm/4-5.6
    Nikon 35mm/1.8, Nikon 50mm/1.8
    Vanguard Alta Pro 263AT tripod, CP324 monopod
    SBH 100 ball head, PH 32 pan head
    SB-700 Speedlight

  7. #2177
    Senior Member
    wev's Avatar

    Re: Post your Insect shots

    Post your Insect shots
    some sort of tiny beetle -- probably a juvenile. Found a dozen of them on a leaf

    Post your Insect shots-beetle3.jpg

    Post your Insect shots-beetle.jpg
    Thanks/Like Dangerspouse, Woodyg3 Thanks/liked this post
     
    wev

    d500
    d5300 x 2
    Tamron 150-600 G2/5-6.3, Tamron 18-400mm/3.5-6.3, Tamron 90mm/2.8 macro
    Nikon 18-55mm/3.6-5.6, Nikon 55-200mm/4-5.6
    Nikon 35mm/1.8, Nikon 50mm/1.8
    Vanguard Alta Pro 263AT tripod, CP324 monopod
    SBH 100 ball head, PH 32 pan head
    SB-700 Speedlight

  8. #2178
    Senior Member
    Bob Blaylock's Avatar

    Re: Post your Insect shots

    Quote Originally Posted by wev View Post
    some sort of tiny beetle -- probably a juvenile.
    Beetles have a complete metamorphosis, like butterflies. The juvenile form is a larva, which looks nothing like the adult beetle. The middle stage is a pupa, and from that emerges the final adult form.

    That said, what you've posted here does not look like a beetle, at least not an adult form thereof. It could be the larval form of some beetle, or it could be some entirely different sort of insect. Whatever it is, I think it looks more likely to be a mature form of some insect that is not a beetle, than that it is a larval form of a beetle. It's definitely not a mature beetle.

  9. #2179
    Senior Member
    wev's Avatar

    Re: Post your Insect shots

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Blaylock View Post
    Beetles have a complete metamorphosis, like butterflies. The juvenile form is a larva, which looks nothing like the adult beetle. The middle stage is a pupa, and from that emerges the final adult form.

    That said, what you've posted here does not look like a beetle, at least not an adult form thereof. It could be the larval form of some beetle, or it could be some entirely different sort of insect. Whatever it is, I think it looks more likely to be a mature form of some insect that is not a beetle, than that it is a larval form of a beetle. It's definitely not a mature beetle.
    Thanks for that. I am nothing if not iffy on bugs. I sent the pics to my campus bug guy, but haven't heard back.
    wev

    d500
    d5300 x 2
    Tamron 150-600 G2/5-6.3, Tamron 18-400mm/3.5-6.3, Tamron 90mm/2.8 macro
    Nikon 18-55mm/3.6-5.6, Nikon 55-200mm/4-5.6
    Nikon 35mm/1.8, Nikon 50mm/1.8
    Vanguard Alta Pro 263AT tripod, CP324 monopod
    SBH 100 ball head, PH 32 pan head
    SB-700 Speedlight

  10. #2180
    Senior Member
    Bob Blaylock's Avatar

    Re: Post your Insect shots

    Quote Originally Posted by wev View Post
    some sort of tiny beetle -- probably a juvenile. Found a dozen of them on a leaf
    On looking again at your pictures, I think that the insect pictured there is a bug, not a beetle.

    By “bug”, I mean a true bug, an insect of the order Hemiptera. The shape looks about right for a true bug, certainly more so than for a beetle. Beetles, by the way, are of the order Coleoptera. I do think this is an immature form, as it does not appear to have wings.

    By the way, here's an interesting little bit of taxonomic information. True bugs, if they have “bug” as part of their common name, “bug” is treated as a separate word. For example, the stink bug, and the assassin bug. Insects that are not true bugs, if they have “bug” as part of their name, it's not treated as a separate word; it's appended to the rest of the name without an intervening space. For example, the ladybug or doodlebug or pillbug (which isn't even an insect at all).

    A similar convention pertains to the word “fly”. True flies are of the order Diptera. A house fly is a true fly, as is a blow fly, a robber fly, and a crane fly. A butterfly is not a true fly, and neither is a firefly or a dragonfly.





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