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  1. #1
    Senior Member
    mikew's Avatar

    How important is the camera body V lens

    Not trying to rewrite the rules with this question but has the priority moved so making the camera body more important than it used to be.
    In the film days lens first was an indisputable fact,if you had a F2 and bought a F3 your results would be the same if you used the same film and lens,the film was your sensor,now with ongoing improvements to sensor capability's and the fact you cant take it out and fit one more suitable for the subject you have chosen, has the situation changed.
    I notice some members have more than one camera body can i take then that they believe you need the right body for the job nearly as much as the right lens.

    Just an idle thought on a wet Sunday morning


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    Mike

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  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Bill16's Avatar

    Re: How important is the camera body V lens

    Since I sorta fit into the description you mentioned, I'll see if I can help answer the question! So I would say Yes, in a way at least! With the advantages both DX and FX offer, having a combo of DX and FX is the best way to go! This is why I got the D7100 to go with my D800E, covering the wide and the reach in the most useful ways! Even my D700 fits into this combo very well, giving the portrait and multi shot needs priorities without the high MPs unneeded in some cases!
    But everybody has their own ideas of what fits their needs, even if having just one camera is that idea! What works for you in you creative mind is what you should go with if possible!
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  3. #3
    Senior Member
    J-see's Avatar

    Re: How important is the camera body V lens

    I think that they're both as important.

    I usually pick my cam to use based upon the subject I shoot and the lens is evidently the one with the best focal length/aperture for such. The quality of my cam defines a large part of what I use it for and that has to do with sensor size, DR or low light capacity.

    Low light and night: D750
    Portrait, landscape or any decent weather shooting without a specific goal; D810
    Birding: D7200
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  4. #4
    Senior Member
    jay_dean's Avatar

    Re: How important is the camera body V lens

    Similar to @J-see, mine all have their niches. The D810 for aviation and other general stuff, the D7200 for birding (its never been used for anything else), and the D700 is for rolling aviation and statics. I guess in the SLR days, film played an important role that's now performed within the camera
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  5. #5
    Senior Member
    rocketman122's Avatar

    Re: How important is the camera body V lens

    Film is the sensor today. So yes cameras are important but unless you specialize in specific parts of photography you could get by with a good all around camera. Imo the d750 is it. Fast enough with fps excellent high iso. Excellent af. Decent price. Good sensor with nice detail. So you could use it for sports for low light shootibg for portraits for weddings. Its the best all arounder.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Retro's Avatar

    Re: How important is the camera body V lens

    I appreciate this input as well. I find it interesting that DX does not stand to FX as a D3300 stands to a D7200. I have a friend who has a D7100 who is a beginner professional. I've been trying to get him to join here. He took a remarkable shot of a chickadee in take-off with a 300mm lens.

    I tend to be an all-or-nothing persnickety person, and the D7200 would be my minimum body. Not having the money for that, I'll stick with film. Adding an F100 to my FE2 would give me much more satisfaction than a D5500.

    Having said that, I wonder if some of you would suggest "If you have the money for a D7200, buy a D610 instead."

    Alternatively, you might say "The D610 is an inferior FX, and the D7200 plays an important role in the line up, as J-See says, so buy the D7200, and the D750 later on." I heard something a while ago about oil being squirted on the sensor. Maybe that adds a really cool special effect or something (jk).

    I suspect that some of you would recommend the D7200 and D750 in a 'full-bodied' collection. As the D7200 is an important tool (birding), it's an ideal camera, and there is obviously an ideal FX body. It seems that one does not move on from DX to FX the way one moves on from an entry level DSLR to a D750.

    I hope I didn't hijack this thread.
    "The most dangerous man, to any government, is the man who is able to think things out for himself, without regard to the prevailing superstitions and taboos. Murray N. Rothbard
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  7. #7
    Senior Member
    J-see's Avatar

    Re: How important is the camera body V lens

    I don't think the D610 should be considered an inferior FX. At some levels it still outperforms the D750. Not by much but it does. It's older technology however.

    Moving from DX to FX is largely influenced by two factors. The biggest is money. Everything related to FX tends to cost more. The second is crop. It is very popular in birding and a lot of DSLR shooters bird. But that factor is running at its last legs because the FX will inevitably catch up in the pixel density battle. Once those odds are evened, it's only about money.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Bill16's Avatar

    Re: How important is the camera body V lens

    I would tend to say it is about what and how you shoot, that would be the most important factor in what I would recommend to another photographer!
    I have never owned a D610, so I can only mildly recommend it to someone looking for an FX! But the biggest reason to recommend upgrading from a DX to a FX is what kind of shots you shoot. Wide like landscapes being a big portion of the shot, the a FX is what I would recommend. You see?

    Which FX would depend on fine tuning your list of needs to see which FX fits best at a price you can afford!


    Quote Originally Posted by Retro View Post
    I appreciate this input as well. I find it interesting that DX does not stand to FX as a D3300 stands to a D7200. I have a friend who has a D7100 who is a beginner professional. I've been trying to get him to join here. He took a remarkable shot of a chickadee in take-off with a 300mm lens.

    I tend to be an all-or-nothing persnickety person, and the D7200 would be my minimum body. Not having the money for that, I'll stick with film. Adding an F100 to my FE2 would give me much more satisfaction than a D5500.

    Having said that, I wonder if some of you would suggest "If you have the money for a D7200, buy a D610 instead."

    Alternatively, you might say "The D610 is an inferior FX, and the D7200 plays an important role in the line up, as J-See says, so buy the D7200, and the D750 later on." I heard something a while ago about oil being squirted on the sensor. Maybe that adds a really cool special effect or something (jk).

    I suspect that some of you would recommend the D7200 and D750 in a 'full-bodied' collection. As the D7200 is an important tool (birding), it's an ideal camera, and there is obviously an ideal FX body. It seems that one does not move on from DX to FX the way one moves on from an entry level DSLR to a D750.

    I hope I didn't hijack this thread.
    Thanks/Like Whiskeyman, Retro Thanks/liked this post
     
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    GITZO G2220 aluminium tripod and ARCA SWISS Z1 SP ball head
    ------------------------Backpacks----------------------------
    Tamrac Expedition 8X, Tamrac Expedition 8,Tamrac Expedition 5

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Challenge Team
    Blacktop's Avatar

    Re: How important is the camera body V lens

    I don't have to pick my cam based on what I use it for. The D750 does it all . I laugh at you, D810!

    Disclaimer: The above post was made in jest and good humor. To any D810 owner who takes it seriously and gets his/her/it panties in a wad, I apologize.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Whiskeyman's Avatar

    Re: How important is the camera body V lens

    A book can be written on this subject, since there is so much to discuss. One of the details I didn't see mentioned earlier is that when shooting birds in flight with a long telephoto lens, it is easier for most to find and track the subject with a full-frame camera. It can be done with a crop sensor camera, but typically it is more difficult. (It can be difficult enough with a full frame camera, as it is.)

    Back to your original question, though. The way I look at it, a photo taken at any particular moment depends upon three immediate things; 1) the camera, 2) the lens, and 3) the photographer. (I'm assuming that all else is equal. You could wait for the light to change, or move to a different vantage point, for the subject to change/move, etc., but we're going to assume that this isn't necessary.) Of the three immediates, each will impact your shot, and if any one of the three is deficient, it will impact your photo.

    Yes, a camera body can be the limiting factor in your photography, and there are niche cameras that work better in certain situations. That is why some have more than one camera, and also why that for many, the camera is more important than it used to be. As well, the lens can also be a big factor; sharpness, light falloff, speed, durability, auto focus quality and speed all are factors often dictated by the lens.

    However, time and time again, it is demonstrated that it is often the photographer, not the lens or camera, that is the limiting factor in taking a good photo.

    WM
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    "Beware of men with theories that explain everything. Trust those who approach the world with humility and cautious insight." - Mark Bowden





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