Shutter Shock

Tquataert

New member
Hi All,

Can anyone help me stop this from happening?
So I'm trying to take pictures of Comet Neowise and I'm finding that every time I take a picture the camera shakes as the shutter closes.
What I've done to try to mitigate this is a manual setting on bulb, lowest F-Stop and ISO6400. I can get a 1-2 second pic to work but anything greater
"shakes". I've also resorted to putting an envelope in front of the lens after I've already opened the shutter, taken it out of the way and then putting it
back in front of the shutter and then closing the shutter. This STILL shows signs of shaking and that to me makes no sense since no more light from the
comet/stars is being done.

I've already done the "focus on a nearby bright star to get a true focus" thing which has helped but 99% of the pics are terrible.

HELP!

Thanks Terry
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Shaking after the shutter closes has no effect on the image. My guess is your camera is shaking all the time. Meaning.... it's not the camera.... it's the tripod.

Just curious what you mean by 'lowest f-stop'?
 

Fred Kingston

Senior Member
It would be helpful if you told us which lens you're using, and ALL you settings... I'm guessing that you're using auto modes and maybe vibration reduction is turned on...
 

Bikerbrent

Senior Member
Welcome aboard. Enjoy the ride.
We look forward to seeing more posts and samples of your work.

Yes, suspect tripod shake also, plus per Fred, we need more information.
 

Marcel

Happily retired
Staff member
There is a shooting mode which is "Mirror up" It raises the mirror when you first depress the shutter, you then have to press the shutter again to actually open the shutter and take the picture.
So ideally, you use the mirror up shooting mode AND the shutter delay function (somewhere in the menu) that waits 2 or more (user choice) after the second push on the shutter button before the camera takes the picture.

This, plus a good and steady tripod, is the only reliable solution to take long exposures with a DSLR.
 

Tquataert

New member
The lens is a Tamron 062 Di II (18-270mm), bulb setting, F5.6, ISO6400 or lower. I was in manual mode on the camera and the lens itself using a remote shutter release. I even tried putting it in the mirror lock-up mode but it made no difference as far as shake. I definitely think it is the tripod. I tested it out last night putting the tripod to it's lowest (sturdiest) position and I saw very little vibration. It's too bad the conditions weren't the best for the comet. Even though I've been taking pictures for a long time I feel like a novice. Especially with the D7000. My astrophotos often look very grainy with this DSLR.
 

Marcel

Happily retired
Staff member
The lens is a Tamron 062 Di II (18-270mm), bulb setting, F5.6, ISO6400 or lower. I was in manual mode on the camera and the lens itself using a remote shutter release. I even tried putting it in the mirror lock-up mode but it made no difference as far as shake. I definitely think it is the tripod. I tested it out last night putting the tripod to it's lowest (sturdiest) position and I saw very little vibration. It's too bad the conditions weren't the best for the comet. Even though I've been taking pictures for a long time I feel like a novice. Especially with the D7000. My astrophotos often look very grainy with this DSLR.
The D7000 was famous for mirror slap. I did some experiments when I had one and found I could get sharper pictures when using the Quiet mode even with shutter speeds around 1/125s.
Using a remote shutter release doesn't prevent the shutter slap. If the tripod is not sturdy enough, the wind could cause similar effects. But using mirror up mode PLUS shutter delay could help you pinpoint the real cause for your concern. It's a simple enough test to do.

Keep us informed of your findings, it could help many others.
 

hark

Administrator
Staff member
Super Mod
Contributor
The D7000 was famous for mirror slap. I did some experiments when I had one and found I could get sharper pictures when using the Quiet mode even with shutter speeds around 1/125s.
Using a remote shutter release doesn't prevent the shutter slap. If the tripod is not sturdy enough, the wind could cause similar effects. But using mirror up mode PLUS shutter delay could help you pinpoint the real cause for your concern. It's a simple enough test to do.

Keep us informed of your findings, it could help many others.

Your comment makes me wonder if the OP is already using Quiet Mode. Isn't there kind of a double slap sound with the shutter actuation and the delayed mirror? :confused: I've never used a D7000 so don't know how Quiet Mode sounds with that body - I'm simply remembering how it's worked on other bodies.
 

Marcel

Happily retired
Staff member
Your comment makes me wonder if the OP is already using Quiet Mode. Isn't there kind of a double slap sound with the shutter actuation and the delayed mirror? :confused: I've never used a D7000 so don't know how Quiet Mode sounds with that body - I'm simply remembering how it's worked on other bodies.
The double slap you are talking about is simply that the mirror goes up and down slower in Q mode. It's quieter, but still cause vibration. This is why the shutter delay function is so important. It makes the camera wait after the mirror goes up and this usually gives time to the whole assembly to stop moving if the camera is on a sturdy tripod.
 

hark

Administrator
Staff member
Super Mod
Contributor
The double slap you are talking about is simply that the mirror goes up and down slower in Q mode. It's quieter, but still cause vibration. This is why the shutter delay function is so important. It makes the camera wait after the mirror goes up and this usually gives time to the whole assembly to stop moving if the camera is on a sturdy tripod.


But I'm wondering if that second slap of the mirror closing is what's causing the vibration after the image was taken.
 

hark

Administrator
Staff member
Super Mod
Contributor
The second slap is the front shutter curtain opening.

That isn't what I was talking about. When in Quiet Mode, the mirror slap is slowed down - delayed slightly. When the mirror closes (which is the second time the mirror slaps), it is slightly delayed after the shutter is finished. That's what I meant. Sorry - I certainly thought my comment was easily understood when I specifically said the second slap of the mirror closing. I didn't stop at the second slap. :rolleyes:
 

480sparky

Senior Member
That isn't what I was talking about. When in Quiet Mode, the mirror slap is slowed down - delayed slightly. When the mirror closes (which is the second time the mirror slaps), it is slightly delayed after the shutter is finished. That's what I meant. Sorry - I certainly thought my comment was easily understood when I specifically said the second slap of the mirror closing. I didn't stop at the second slap. :rolleyes:

If the mirror is coming down, the shutter is closed. So that cannot affect the image.
 

BackdoorArts

Senior Member
It's more than likely your tripod. Does it have a hook on the bottom of the center pole? If so, fill a plastic shopping bag with weight (bean bags, anything that adds more weight than bulk) and hang it from the hook. The more weight the less it should shake.
 

hark

Administrator
Staff member
Super Mod
Contributor
Obviously I failed to be really detailed with my explanation, so here goes....

The OP is using a remote shutter release. The mirror goes up. That itself can cause a vibration. The shutter opens. The vibration may very well be continuing at this point. The shutter closes. The mirror goes down and causes additional vibration which may be apparent visually afterwards (which is what I was addressing but obviously didn't make clear). The image winds up showing signs of vibration - most likely caused by the first mirror slap - or wind - or possibly because the VR was left on.

As others have mentioned, put weights on your tripod to secure it to prevent any shaking from wind or mirror slap. Make sure your VR is turned off because that can cause motion blur when VR isn't required - using VR when your camera is on a tripod is a no-no. :) Did I miss anything this time? :shame:
 

BF Hammer

Senior Member
Tquataert, I have had a D7000 and my own example of that Tamron 18-270mm lens for many years. I have used the D7000 many times for astro-photography on tripod. But I never tried the Tamron lens for that. I had a Nikon 70-300, Nikon 500mm reflex, and later a Sigma 150-600mm C lens.

What I can comment on in general for long-exposure on tripod with the D7000 is that VR mode must be turned off on tripod. The lens will add vibration to an already steadied-state and just ruin your shots. VR for handholding or monopods only. You have the right idea with the remote shutter release. We do not know just how good of quality tripod you are using. I can tell you from experience that money invested in that gear pays the most dividends in the final product. Cheap tripod or heads will simply shake.

In the shooting setup menu is a mode that adds a delay between the mirror slapping up and the shutter activating. I was actually using my D7000 to shoot Jupiter and Saturn just last night and I forgot to activate this. It can help. Also on the left command dial, bottom row is a "MUP" mode. This slaps the mirror up when you press the shutter release and it stays up. You then have to press the shutter release a 2nd time to take the photo and the mirror and shutter close together. This mode is specifically for addressing your problem, giving you a chance to manually allow the camera to stop shaking before taking the photo. It is weird to use as you must use the shutter-release twice for every 1 photo you take. But if your tripod is not steady for the load it carries, this feature becomes useless anyhow.

And also depending on how old and well-used the 18-270mm lens is, they have a wicked creep in the zoom action. It could actually be trying to slide from it's own weight when angled up. I like my lens, but that is a really bad "feature" of it.

Truly with the setup right and a decent lens, the D7000 works good for astro-photography. Now I used a Sigma 150-600 for the following photos (from tripod, no tracking mount), but I used a D7000 body. VR turned off of course. :)

IbTuPgI.jpg

IIQLySc.jpg
 

BeegRhob

Senior Member
Contributor
So I'm trying to take pictures of Comet Neowise and I'm finding that every time I take a picture the camera shakes as the shutter closes.

I can get a 1-2 second pic to work but anything greater "shakes".

I've also resorted to putting an envelope in front of the lens after I've already opened the shutter, taken it out of the way and then putting it
back in front of the shutter and then closing the shutter. This STILL shows signs of shaking and that to me makes no sense since no more light from the
comet/stars is being done.

After 1 or 2 seconds, but not before is when it "shakes". The camera would be consistently doing it, unless there are other factors after 1 or 2 seconds, like wind blowing the tripod or someone leaning on the tripod, something like that. The wind blowing may happen before the 1 to 2 second sweet spot as well. You used an envelope to control the light entering the sensor, so when the shutter closes, there should be no light available to the sensor. So, we have a comet, moving at a high rate of speed, but 160 million miles away. We also have the rotation of the earth to take into consideration. I am looking at this being the culprit, not anything else. I could be wrong.

Rob
 
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