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  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Horoscope Fish's Avatar

    Re: Getting to M and Off Camera Flash

    No real advice for you, just another satisfied Yongnuo 622n user chiming in. Good luck with whatever you decide on... It's good to have choices!


    › See More: Getting to M and Off Camera Flash
    ~ Paul

    D750 (with OLPF Removed), MB-D10; D7100, MB-D15; Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art, Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art, Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD, Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD, Nikon 85mm f/1.8G, Nikon 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6; Yongnuo 568EX, Nikon SB-700; Manfrotto X055PROB, 3-Legged Thing Airhed II... All Stuffed into a Manfrotto Pro Backpack 50
    ....
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  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Bikerbrent's Avatar

    Re: Getting to M and Off Camera Flash

    Quote Originally Posted by Fortkentdad View Post

    However the most telling thing is your remark "... then I will use Manual Flash Mode" - which implies you know how to use manual.

    I think it is worthwhile learning, even if I don't use it.
    I had a learning edge in that I had to learn to do everything manual. I started out in serious photography with my fathers Argus C3 in the early 1960's. You had no choice to to do everything manual including using a handheld light-meter and actual 1-time use flash bulbs! I even had the opportunity to use a 4"x5" sheet film view camera a few times, that was quite interesting.

    Thus, today, I can really appreciate the modern conveniences and all the gains that have been made in photography. But I also recognize their shortcomings also. Learn all that you can. If you get the chance, try a hand held light-meter, try some film photography. Your modern digital photography will improve the more you can learn. Do learn by doing everything possible in full manual mode, from exposure to flash, then use the modern features when appropriate.
    Thanks/Like Fortkentdad Thanks/liked this post
     
    Brent Harritt: Poway, CA: D7200, D200, D70, F100: Tokina 12-24mm, Nikon 18-200mm, Sigma 150-600mm, Nikon 18-70mm, Tokina 28-70mm f2.6-2.8, Nikon 50 f1.8, Nikon 80-200mm f2.8, Tokina 100mm f2.8 Macro

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    WayneF's Avatar

    Re: Getting to M and Off Camera Flash

    There are a few choices, and situations, but just saying "manual" doesn't specify if it means the camera or the flash mode?

    For indoor flash, camera A or P mode means the shutter speed is normally always the minimum speed with flash, meaning always 1/60 second (the default, E1 menus can go slower). Is that the best choice?
    Manual camera mode shutter speed does not change the iTTL flash exposure, but it allows choice of other shutter speeds (to control ambient).
    And camera S mode is much worse, indoors it means the lens is wide open.
    Camera M mode has very much to offer indoors with flash, for any settings you choose. Very hard to beat it for indoor flash. Allows any shutter speed up to maximum sync. Shutter speed does not affect the flash exposure, but it does affect the ambient (which we can ignore, but we might want to keep it out, or to keep it in).

    But outdoors in sunlight with fill flash, we cannot ignore the ambient then. Camera A or P mode offers advantages then for ambient. And TTL flash compensation can offer fixed lighting ratio for fill then (and TTL BL is automatic fill compensation). Makes a hard job very easy.

    TTL flash mode is very handy for variable situations, like walking around indoors with bounce. In varied situations, TTL flash mode can be a much closer starting point than manual flash, and can usually maintain the same consistent result in different but similar situations. Still is camera manual mode though, indoors.

    But for any fixed session (like portraits), manual camera and manual flash mode is king. Maximum sync shutter speed to keep out the orange incandescent. Manual flash for a consistent level. Especially if using a few flash units, it allows great and consistent control (but a flash meter will be extremely useful for that).

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Fortkentdad's Avatar

    Re: Getting to M and Off Camera Flash

    Quote Originally Posted by WayneF View Post
    There are a few choices, and situations, but just saying "manual" doesn't specify if it means the camera or the flash mode?. . . .

    But for any fixed session (like portraits), manual camera and manual flash mode is king. Maximum sync shutter speed to keep out the orange incandescent. Manual flash for a consistent level. Especially if using a few flash units, it allows great and consistent control (but a flash meter will be extremely useful for that).

    =================

    When I speak of getting to "M" I am referring to both on camera and for the flash.


    I got out of "auto" on the camera dial sometime ago and moved onto the "A" or "S" (never really looked at "P" but I think I should). Played with "M" a little bit - very little. I have to use "M" for my lensbaby as it is a fully manual lens so that was by necessity.


    My flashes have always been TTL and when I'd go to off camera it was with Nikon's CLS which worked for me. Until I bought a big umbrella style softbox that enclosed the flash - the line of sight was lost and CLS failed. I also bought a smaller rectangular softbox at the same time but in that case the CLS 'eye' was outside the box so it was OK.


    My venture to get the "M" off flash included watching many a youtube (love B&H's Event Space) and others. I also read a bit. And experimented.


    I know I'll need to buy a radio trigger, not sure which one. Younguo is cheap enough and seems to have satisfied users. Godox X1 is same price and has a nice system to offer. Pocket Wizards are "industry standard for professionals" but OMG - three times the price. And Phottix is no better price wise. Cactus splits the differences and offers some unique features. Still not made up my mind with that. Using CLS in the meantime, just not using my big umbrella softbox.


    From what you and others have said I can see that knowing how to set the camera to manual and have the flashes in manual would be a good thing - a very good thing to know how to do. Sometimes it makes sense to use TTL. With a camera mounted flash walking about at an event it makes sense.


    One thing that puzzels me though is how having TTL with off camera flash works. I can see on camera with one flash as the camera meters the light needs 'through the lens' aka TTL and sets the lighting accordingly to get the 'perfect' average lighting. But if I mix TTL flash and M flash and some of my off camera flashes are modified (in a softbox) or bounced how does the camera factor that into the TTL equation? And how does the camera TTl system know how close my off camera flashes are to my subject. Proximity to the subject makes all the difference.


    I see some systems offer 'pass through' TTL foot on the trigger (e.g. Cactus and some of the Pocket Wizards) but the remote flashes must be manual. In that situation how does the camera's TTL take into account the effect of the remote flashes. The camera's TTL system might know about the other flashes if it communicates with the trigger or if you use the on camera flash as a commander, but again, if modified in a softbox or otherwise, and proximity to the subject. The camera cannot factor that into it's TTL equation. So what is the point of TTL on the camera in a set up with off camera flashes in manual mode?




    ....


    It makes a difference to my decision on triggers. I could bite the bullet and pay the big bucks for a P-Wiz 'Super 5 Pack"(2 x Flex TT5, 1 mini TT1 and the AC3 gizmo, part 5 is the bag) this comes in at $750 to control two off camera flashes. Ouch. Godox and Younguo by comparisons do this for under $200 and Cactus splits the difference at $390 (all prices CDN). All but Cactus offer TTL on the remotes. Reviews of the P-Wiz TT5/TT1 system seems pretty good (although there are some who say give it a pass). Manual based triggers are less expensive (many need a PC-Sync input which none of my flashes have - but a hotshoe adapter fix is possible).


    In the meantime I'm still experimenting in manual. ....

    And one more thing, ... see very mixed opinions on whether a light meter is needed. Obviously not necessary, but is it worth the $280 I see for one that does flash? I have the app on my cell phone that gives ambient light but no good for flash.
    FKD Alberta Canada

    D610, D7100, D5100

    Nikkor FX:
    AFS 60mm 2.8, AFS 85mm 1.8, AFD 105 2.8, AFS 70-200 2.8 VRI, AFS 200-500 5.6.
    DX: AFS 16-85 VR, AFS VR 55-300, AFS 35mm 1.8.
    Tamron: SP 24-70 2.8, SP 70-300 4-5.6, SP 17-35 2.8-4
    Lensbaby 5.8 F/3.5 Fisheye
    Kenko 300 DGX 1.4 TC

    SB-400, 600 & 700, Metz 58 AF2 & a Benro Transfunctional Travel Angel /Jobu Micro Gimbal

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    WayneF's Avatar

    Re: Getting to M and Off Camera Flash

    Quote Originally Posted by Fortkentdad View Post
    I got out of "auto" on the camera dial sometime ago and moved onto the "A" or "S" (never really looked at "P" but I think I should). Played with "M" a little bit - very little. I have to use "M" for my lensbaby as it is a fully manual lens so that was by necessity.
    Speaking of using flash, A,S,P modes offer metering ambient exposure, and P is often a good choice with fill flash in bright sunshine - P prevents our setting our indoor f/4 in A mode, and then wondering why we only get ERROR in bright sun (gonna need about f/11 due to maximum shutter sync speed). But ambient level is often totally insignificant indoors, to be ignored. If we do pick some of it up, it is often orange incandescent. Manual lets us set faster than 1/60 to keep it out.

    One thing that puzzels me though is how having TTL with off camera flash works. I can see on camera with one flash as the camera meters the light needs 'through the lens' aka TTL and sets the lighting accordingly to get the 'perfect' average lighting. But if I mix TTL flash and M flash and some of my off camera flashes are modified (in a softbox) or bounced how does the camera factor that into the TTL equation? And how does the camera TTl system know how close my off camera flashes are to my subject. Proximity to the subject makes all the difference.
    Speaking of the Nikon Commander, when we push the shutter button (or FV Lock button) then the Commander swings into action. It individually requests and then meters a preflash from each TTL group, and sets the metered power level in each TTL group. It also sends the Commander menu Manual power to any Manual groups. System does not know how many flashes, but it individually meters each TTL flash group. A group could be one or more flashes metered as one.

    The remote flashes are still TTL metering, same as one hot shoe flash. Metered one group at a time with Commander. Bounce for example, goes up and reflects and come back down, and the meter meters the center spot of the frame. Or a remote in a softbox or an umbrella, the meter still meters the light actually reaching the center spot of the frame, where it matters (doesn't matter where it has been first). If manual flashes, they are not metered, but they receive instructions to set the power level from the Commander menu.

    This all happens in a split second, but all of that flashing can cause pictures of the subject blinking, but FV Lock is an easy way to work around that. Or the inexpensive Nikon SG-3IR shield will help too.


    I see some systems offer 'pass through' TTL foot on the trigger (e.g. Cactus and some of the Pocket Wizards) but the remote flashes must be manual. In that situation how does the camera's TTL take into account the effect of the remote flashes. The camera's TTL system might know about the other flashes if it communicates with the trigger or if you use the on camera flash as a commander, but again, if modified in a softbox or otherwise, and proximity to the subject. The camera cannot factor that into it's TTL equation. So what is the point of TTL on the camera in a set up with off camera flashes in manual mode?
    The manual triggers are easy, but I'm largely ignorant of all the TTL remote systems except Nikon Commander. Each is an individual system, with its own methods, and no compatibility among them.

    But (excluding the Commander system), what the camera TTL system sees to work with is one hot shoe, with hot shoe pins to communicate with One TTL flash. Just One. Nikons multiple TTL system is the Commander.

    I'm not the one to discuss the others, never had one of them. Just guessing, but like in the Yongnuo system, the remotes are in TTL mode, which is the mode in all TTL flashes that the flash can accept power level from the flash foot. Not the same action as TTL mode however, because the camera has to meter TTL, and it knows how to meter one hot shoe flash. I've been curious about them, but not enough to buy one. I'd be very interested in hearing details of how they work.

    The modes I normally use are one hot shoe flash for bounce, usually TTL. Or sometimes the Commander or manual optical slaves for two remotes in quick umbrella setup. Or alternately, multiple manual flashes in a studio setting.

    And one more thing, ... see very mixed opinions on whether a light meter is needed. Obviously not necessary, but is it worth the $280 I see for one that does flash? I have the app on my cell phone that gives ambient light but no good for flash.
    My opinion is the camera has a very good meter for non-flash use, and that's what I use for non-flash. It is a reflected meter, but we learn to to use it. An incident meter reads more accurately, but awkwardly has to meter from the subjects location.

    For hot shoe flash, again, the camera meter is very good (and still a reflected meter). I use bounce indoors, and direct TTL with compensation for fill flash in sunlight.

    For one manual hot shoe flash (bounce or direct), trial and error is not hard to find the right exposure (TTL is normally a closer starting point though).

    For multiple flash though (including only two flashes), the lighting ratio is the thing. To know what we're doing, we have to meter them, one way or another.

    For studio flash with multiple manual flash, then a hand held incident meter seems very necessary to me. I can't imagine living life without it. (I have a couple, but I only use them for that purpose). IMO, multiple manual flash is about the only reason to have a handheld meter today, but for multiple flash, it is a day and night difference, either guessing at the level of four flashes (at every setup), or simply taking a minute to meter them and setting each of them as we want them to be, and then KNOWING what they will do. Easy and fast and correct repeatability from last time.

    I've never had any problem with a simple optical slave (speaking of indoor sessions), but I've never put one inside a softbox either.

    A Sekonic L-308 is not more than $200, and is very adequate for studio flash. L-308S was previous, and L-308S-U is the new replacement (I think longer warranty may be only difference?)

    See Why would I need a handheld light meter? for more, including a description of using it at page bottom.
    Last edited by WayneF; 01-15-2017 at 02:11 AM.

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Fortkentdad's Avatar

    Re: Getting to M and Off Camera Flash

    Quote Originally Posted by WayneF View Post
    Speaking of using flash, . . . . .
    Thanks for all of that.

    Will take a bit to digest it all. I will have to take a closer look at "P" too.

    RE: How TTL multiple O.C.F. works:
    "
    It individually requests and then meters a preflash from each TTL group, and sets the metered power level in each TTL group. ..." Ah so this is probably how all of these TTL Triggers work - each controlled flash is sending out a pre-flash that is measured - collectively by the group. I didn't know that would be done from each flash unit. Interesting how these are then grouped.

    RE: Optical Slaves - I will try and see if the flash fires on optical slave inside this umbrella-softbox. Have not tried shooting optical slave mode. Did learn that the SB-600 does not have it, nor does my antique Vivitar 2800 Auto Thyristor but the SB-700 and Metz both do. I think I'll order one of this little optical slave hot foots - under $20 on e-bay for the one you can tell to ignore the pre-flash.

    Sounds like the Light Meter would be worthwhile, if I end up going with a system that uses multiple manual flashes without TTL remote controls. For example if I chose Cactus (and it is under serious consideration) then only the on camera flash is in TTL and there is no 'commander' involved so the TTL would not be factoring in these other flashes which would be in manual. In that case I'd want to include the cost of a Sekonic L-308 in the package (CDN price is $290 as our dollar is about $ .75 US now), This makes the cheaper ones even more attractive as they all offer TTL control (Younguo 622n with a TX controller) or the Godox x1 system).

    Thanks again.

    I am heading to the city (Calgary) end of next week and hope to sneak away to visit a camera store or two with my camera and Metz to try out a couple of these trigger systems.











    FKD Alberta Canada

    D610, D7100, D5100

    Nikkor FX:
    AFS 60mm 2.8, AFS 85mm 1.8, AFD 105 2.8, AFS 70-200 2.8 VRI, AFS 200-500 5.6.
    DX: AFS 16-85 VR, AFS VR 55-300, AFS 35mm 1.8.
    Tamron: SP 24-70 2.8, SP 70-300 4-5.6, SP 17-35 2.8-4
    Lensbaby 5.8 F/3.5 Fisheye
    Kenko 300 DGX 1.4 TC

    SB-400, 600 & 700, Metz 58 AF2 & a Benro Transfunctional Travel Angel /Jobu Micro Gimbal

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Zeke_M's Avatar

    Re: Getting to M and Off Camera Flash

    My rommie adopted a cat today. On arrival "Miss Pickles" immediately took residence under my roommate's bed.
    A perfect opportunity to try out my very rusty off camera skills.
    Laid the SB-800 on the floor an arms length away. Set Commander mode to M 1/8.
    Fiddled with the camera and got this.

    Thanks/Like Fortkentdad, singlerosa, arsudarsan Thanks/liked this post
     
    Nikon:
    Cameras:
    D7100 gripped - D3100
    Primes:
    35mm f1.8 AF-S DX - 50mm f1.8 AF-D - 85mm f1.8 AF-S FX - 105mm f2.8 AF-D Micro
    Telephoto: 55-300mm f/4.5-5.6 DX VR -
    24-120mm f4 AF-S -70-200mm f2.8 AF-S VRII - 70-210mm f4 AF - 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6G AF-S ED VR II
    Flash: SB-800 - SB-400

    Sigma Lens: 17mm-50mm f2.8 VC
    Tokina Lens: 12-24mm AT-X Pro SD F4 (IF) DX
    Yongnuo Flash: YN-568EX
    Benro COM37AL Tripod
    Manfrotto MHXPRO-BHQ6 XPRO Ball Head

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Fortkentdad's Avatar

    Re: Getting to M and Off Camera Flash

    Getting to M and Off Camera Flash
    Quote Originally Posted by WayneF View Post

    . . . .

    I've never had any problem with a simple optical slave (speaking of indoor sessions), but I've never put one inside a softbox either. . . . .
    So I tried the optical slave - by which I mean I turn the SB-700 to "SU-4" from the manual it says: "SU-4 type wireless multiple flash-unit photography: wireless multipleflash-unit photography suited to taking picture of a fast-moving subject" - but I thought it just meant that with SU-4 the flash is now in optical slave mode? Anyway, SU-4 worked.

    I did spin the flashhead 180 which made it a pain to make manual adjustments but trigger worked well. And I suspect that same trick of turning the head would make ti work in CLS too. .... tried it and it does. Just need to be careful about placement to ensure 'line of sight".

    Getting to M and Off Camera Flash-dsc_7569-gearshots-wide-0001.jpgGetting to M and Off Camera Flash-dsc_7583-gearshots-0004.jpg

    Decided to shoot my gear. I did try to trigger these optical flashes with my camera phone flash - didn't work.

    This reduces the 'need' to buy triggers as I can now trigger a flash with this umbrella-softbox contraption - in manual. Having the control of the power on top of the camera would be a nice touch.

    This is how the end product looked. A 'little' colour shifting for fun post.

    Getting to M and Off Camera Flash-dsc_7589-gearshots-0002.jpg
    Last edited by Fortkentdad; 01-15-2017 at 05:08 AM.
    Thanks/Like Zeke_M Thanks/liked this post
     
    FKD Alberta Canada

    D610, D7100, D5100

    Nikkor FX:
    AFS 60mm 2.8, AFS 85mm 1.8, AFD 105 2.8, AFS 70-200 2.8 VRI, AFS 200-500 5.6.
    DX: AFS 16-85 VR, AFS VR 55-300, AFS 35mm 1.8.
    Tamron: SP 24-70 2.8, SP 70-300 4-5.6, SP 17-35 2.8-4
    Lensbaby 5.8 F/3.5 Fisheye
    Kenko 300 DGX 1.4 TC

    SB-400, 600 & 700, Metz 58 AF2 & a Benro Transfunctional Travel Angel /Jobu Micro Gimbal

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    WayneF's Avatar

    Re: Getting to M and Off Camera Flash

    SU-4 mode is a regular optical slave, but IMO, a spectacularly sensitive one. It does seem to take a real flash to trigger it, it seems to know a slower light pulse is not a flash. Nikon SU-4 originally was an external slave unit for a flash foot, and then starting with SB-800, it was built into the better flash models.

    Commander is more touchy, line of sight is important. I don't put the flash inside of anything, but with umbrellas, it always seems possible to rotate the flash body so that the slave sensor has a view of the camera commander. Commander also seems to always work just being close to the camera, like up to 4 or 5 feet behind it even.

    A remote with commander has to see the commander on camera, but an optical slave can instead have a view of another slaves flash. If using multiple slaves, the camera can trigger the easy one, and it can trigger the others. But generally, indoors, my experience is that it doesn't much matter what we do in that regard, the SU-4 optical slaves are gonna trigger, from reflections back from the subject, or from walls, etc.

    There is an (old) test of some Ebay slaves at Optical slave triggers for speedlights

    Using a camera internal flash at lowest 1/128 power as the trigger (directly aimed at the remote flash), I determined the triggering range was:

    Nikon SU-4 slave - 132 feet (and I was out the door and across the street with my back against a fence. It might have gone further, but I couldn't.

    Alienbees internal slaves - 43 feet

    The other slaves, mostly Ebay, and were triggered from 9 to 29 feet. We are talking cheapies, and they vary. These are external slaves, where the SU-4 and Alienbees are internal slaves.

    Of these external slaves, the Wein Peanut WEPN slave was the best and most sensitive I saw (29 feet from 1/128 power internal flash), however it simply will not work at all on the newer Nikon speedlights with a 3.6V sync voltage (like say the SB-600). It works great on the others (like Yongnuo) with a 5V sync voltage. The sync voltage powers the externals. Those slaves internal to a flash have battery voltage on them. And often are triggered by much higher working level of the other flashes (instead of 1/128 internal).

    But when using the Alienbees slaves (four flashes), I simply pay no attention at all to the slaves or how they are aimed, they just simply always work (indoors in a portrait situation). The background light is "hidden" behind the subject (Commander will NOT work there), and the hair light is high and behind, and sensor is aimed the worst possible direction, directly away from subject and other lights. They simply just always work (room reflections, etc). My experience is if it is in the same room, it's gonna trigger (from wall reflections I assume)


    Back to the multiple manual flash.. TTL is a quick setup which works well for two flashes, as main and fill light. Fast and easy.
    But the Commander only handles 2 flashes, or some are 3 flashes. And when you go to four flashes, probably that adds background and hair lights, and TTL is simply unusable for those. See 45 degree Portrait Lighting Setup ... the four pictures about mid page of the individual lights shows why TTL can't be useful for those.
    Last edited by WayneF; 01-15-2017 at 08:13 AM.

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Fortkentdad's Avatar

    Re: Getting to M and Off Camera Flash

    Quote Originally Posted by WayneF View Post
    SU-4 mode is a regular optical slave, but IMO, a spectacularly sensitive one. It does seem to take a real flash to trigger it, . . . .

    Back to the multiple manual flash.. TTL is a quick setup which works well for two flashes, as main and fill light. Fast and easy.
    But the Commander only handles 2 flashes, or some are 3 flashes. And when you go to four flashes, probably that adds background and hair lights, and TTL is simply unusable for those. See 45 degree Portrait Lighting Setup ... the four pictures about mid page of the individual lights shows why TTL can't be useful for those.

    Thanks again.

    Read your article as linked and started to browse more - helpful info for another project I really need to get back to and that is scanning old photo's.

    Anyway, good insights into the SB-600 and it's voltage issues for optical slave triggers. Interesting comments on Nikon's SU-4 too.

    I see using the SB-600 either controlled by Nikon's CLS Commander or by a radio trigger and not an optical slave.

    If I get a radio trigger I'm thinking that I could pair it with the SB-700 in a softbox put the radio trigger on the SB-600 and set the SB-700 to SU-4 mode. I could then set the SB-700 to half power or some other value, and the SB-600 to TTL. The way you explained TTL the metering would take into account the total light it sees which would be the SB-600 plus the SB-700 at whatever manual setting I choose. The TTL would then try and adjust the output of the SB-600 to get to what TTL thinks is the proper exposure. This would work (I think) as long as the SB-700 was not already too bright. By pairing like this I'd extend the battery life of both flashes and the recycle time. Be great if that worked for when I do something like the Santa shoot at the daycare when by the time the 50th kid goes through my wait for the 'beep' gets longer. And I can't get a second shot in when that perfect smile comes on their face a second after the camera flashes.

    I did try that out and it did work (in that both flashed - didn't measure the output levels). I will want to get a different multiple flash mounting gizmo as the L bracket I used worked but I think there are better ways.


    As for the trigger search - as I read (and watch) reviews I'm now leaning away from Godox and towards Yongnuo. Was tempted to drop the coin and go for a P-Wiz TT5 Super-5 package deal ($750 CDN) for a trigger and two receivers but I really could not justify the extra cash and not all TT5 users were satisfied customers, the kit is triggered by a TT1 which it seems has battery issues. There are those who love it for sure but with Yongnuo the replacement costs per unit are so low I can radio control all flashes. I would look at YN flashes in the future with triggers built in. I am interested in the Godox 360 bare bulb flash but seems the 622n works fine with the 360 so no need to go Godox just to control Godox flashes.

    The other contenders - Phottix Odin is about the same price as the P-Wiz (and some say better system) and Cactus - but that system does not give the TTL option. Going to focus a bit more on the Odin II and see if it is worth the coin ($720ish for controller and two receivers - and no on-camera flash option.
    FKD Alberta Canada

    D610, D7100, D5100

    Nikkor FX:
    AFS 60mm 2.8, AFS 85mm 1.8, AFD 105 2.8, AFS 70-200 2.8 VRI, AFS 200-500 5.6.
    DX: AFS 16-85 VR, AFS VR 55-300, AFS 35mm 1.8.
    Tamron: SP 24-70 2.8, SP 70-300 4-5.6, SP 17-35 2.8-4
    Lensbaby 5.8 F/3.5 Fisheye
    Kenko 300 DGX 1.4 TC

    SB-400, 600 & 700, Metz 58 AF2 & a Benro Transfunctional Travel Angel /Jobu Micro Gimbal





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