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  1. #11
    Senior Member
    WayneF's Avatar

    Re: How to light a church

    15 seats per row, with 18 inches spacing, is 22.5 feet width.

    18mm DX at 15 feet is 19.7 feet width, field of view.

    Calling the width 20 feet, then at 41 feet distance (for some range depth), that computes 48 mm focal length.
    ( Lens Field of View Calculator (FOV) )

    SB-910 DX Guide number for 50mm zoom is 147.6 ISO 100. At ISO 400, GN 295.

    Plugging these numbers (GN 147.6, ISO 400, 41 feet) into GN calculator at
    Understanding Guide Numbers, including GN Calculator

    at 41 feet shows f/7.1 with one SB-910 flash, maximum power (for this GN, Standard DX mode). Two equal flashes is f/10.

    41 feet at f/7.1 shows +/- 1/3 stop range is 36.90 to 46.49 feet, which is 9.6 feet range.
    I suspect four rows of chairs and aisles may be deeper than that?
    and assuming if centered at 41 feet, then +/- 1/3 stop means there is 2/3 stop difference, front to back.


    Calculator shows that at 18mm 15 feet, you could use 1/4 power level for f/10

    But the range of 15 feet f/10 is only 13.05 to 16.44 feet, +/- 1/3 stop. That is only 3.4 feet range (at +/- 1/3 stop exposure).


    › See More: How to light a church
    Last edited by WayneF; 04-25-2015 at 05:02 PM.



  2. #12
    Senior Member

    Re: How to light a church

    Omg Wayne you are a genius
    I didn't understand a word of it but, I think you should be a genius
    Thanks/Like SteveH Thanks/liked this post
     

  3. #13
    Senior Member

    Re: How to light a church?

    Many thanks

  4. #14
    Senior Member

    Re: How to light a church

    Many thanks WayneF.
    A genius if ever there was on. I will process the information you have given me and try out a few test shots.
    Don't go away!!!
    Can I post you an early test shot I took some weeks ago?
    Thanks/Like hark Thanks/liked this post
     

  5. #15
    Senior Member

    Re: How to light a church

    Wayne has given me something to think about will let you know what happens when I process it all!!!

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    LouCioccio's Avatar

    Re: How to light a church?

    How to light a church
    adding more textOkay here are two images one in a gym and the other in church. These are before I bought big strobes (AC/DC Flashpoints 620); I am using two umbrellas to spread the light and two Olympus FL50 in "manual power mode" probably Ĺ power each.
    How to light a church-pb151941a.jpgHow to light a church-pb191956.jpg Both are on 8 or 9 foot light stands so that shadows are low. With some of the glasses you can see two umbrellas. Sorry not done with a Nikon. Borrow a friend's extra SB900 you'll need at least two, highest ISO that you find acceptable.
    Lou Cioccio
    PS I hate RED it saturates!!! Have enough room on each side if using a wide angle so that person(s) do not look wide or spread out.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    hark's Avatar

    Re: How to light a church

    Quote Originally Posted by Precisionpro View Post
    Many thanks WayneF.
    A genius if ever there was on. I will process the information you have given me and try out a few test shots.
    Don't go away!!!
    Can I post you an early test shot I took some weeks ago?
    Yes, Wayne is absolutely brilliant when it comes to knowledge about flash.

    Quote Originally Posted by Precisionpro View Post
    Wayne has given me something to think about will let you know what happens when I process it all!!!
    Please let us know how it goes. Looking forward to seeing your results!
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and
    My 2018 Thread
    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  8. #18
    Senior Member
    WayneF's Avatar

    Re: How to light a church?

    How to light a church
    Aw you guys... Never seen multiplication before? Thanks, but it's really no big deal. I have learned the inverse square law, but it's just details. No grand new theories.


    Quote Originally Posted by LouCioccio View Post

    How to light a church-pb151941a.jpgHow to light a church-pb191956.jpg

    PS I hate RED it saturates!!! Have enough room on each side if using a wide angle so that person(s) do not look wide or spread out.
    Red does tend to clip in Daylight or Flash white balance, but it's not so much the red here. The flash is too close in the first picture (too close for the large range needed). The one center red jacket is overexposed (maybe too much overlap of the two flashes?), but mostly, it is all the front row faces that are overexposed. The second picture is farther back, and did better, greater acceptable range.

    So it is the front row DISTANCE that is overexposed. Direct flash can only be a proper exposure at one single distance. Anything closer is brighter, and anything farther is darker. But how much works on sort of an exaggerated percentage basis (inverse square law), and a greater distance simply has more middle ground range. Important parameters include the depth of the needed range, and the distance to the middle range considered. We adjust the flash power for the middle row, not the front row. We can stand back and zoom in, or we can place just the lights further back. This does require significantly greater flash power, perhaps multiple lights.

    I put a Guide Number calculator at Understanding Guide Numbers, including GN Calculator
    and one of its features is that it shows this depth range for various exposure tolerances, like plus and minus 1/4 or 1/3 stop (each side of middle distance). I had not seen that feature before, but it just falls out of the numbers. Seems important photographically.

    Guide Number and Inverse Square law is computed about direct flash, but umbrellas and softboxes can be approximated (the path distance fall off, not the absolute GN intensity) by considering the path distance to the FLASH itself. That means distance to the flash tube in softboxes or shoot through umbrellas, or to the umbrella fabric and back to the flash tube in reflected umbrellas.
    Last edited by WayneF; 04-26-2015 at 06:42 PM.

  9. #19
    Junior Member

    Re: How to light a church

    To shoot at such choir you really need to understand some things first:
    - The athmosphere into the church: is it a modern one, medieval, light, dark, what illumination is there (warm light, neon tubes etc...) try to respect the ambient of the church making the same sensation you feel on the spot to appear in your picture, so plan carefully the temperature and softness of the light. (sometimes a candle light scenario may work 1000 times better than a bright scenario)
    - The presence of natural light
    - The place where the choir will stay: is it a restricted place, is it wide? is there any place in front above, at sides where you can place your light sources?
    - The quality you are expecting: do you really need shooting at ISO 100 ?

    Then on these information you can plan your lighting
    consider that lighting a wide subject you will require a wide source of light, begin looking at the church warehouse they will probably have the items to make you build a big orientable white board, use it to reflect your flashes.
    Or, if you really need a more intimate feel, try hiring some tungsten movie spot light, they are really cheap.





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