+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Brian's Avatar

    Re: Tips on using manual mode?

    (Edit- posted at the same time as above, so obviously agree completely)

    The nice thing about Digital is the immediate feedback to allow you to experiment. Look at the Histogram of the image and learn how to read it. If your subject is strongly backlit, much of the histogram will by "too the right", meaning saturated. Strong frontlit subject- most of the pixels will be to the left- underexposed, your subject should be somewhere in the middle and upper (Right) third.

    I use manual mode when the lighting on the subject is "way off" from most of the area in the image. "Matrix Metering" attempts to take that into account. I use center-weighted metering as you can "visualize" what the meter is basing the reading on, and you can compensate. Most of the time, means adding to the exposure as the subject is backlit. Sometimes manual mode can be faster than using exposure compensation, or exposure lock.


    › See More: Tips on using manual mode?
    Digital: Nikon DF,Nikon D1x, Nikon D1, Nikon E3, Leica M Monochrom, Leica M9, Leica M8.
    Film: Most every Nikon from the Nikon M through to the F3HP.



  2. #12
    Senior Member
    480sparky's Avatar

    Re: Tips on using manual mode?

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    ......... much of the histogram will by "too the right", meaning saturated. .......
    Meaning overexposed, not saturated.
    Don't mind me... I'm out roaming around somewhere between Zone III and VII.


    Go forth and actuate!


    My Website.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Brian's Avatar

    Re: Tips on using manual mode?

    Quote Originally Posted by 480sparky View Post
    Meaning overexposed, not saturated.
    I mean - off the scale, too the right is saturated. The sensor has a "saturation" count for each pixel typically running around 30,000 ( higher pixel count sensors) to 120,000 (Nikon D4 and DF) electrons before saturating. Many people seem afraid to have portions of the image "saturated", or "blown-out". Sometimes it is unavoidable, especially with digital. This also occurs when shooting film, but film is more graceful about it.

    Last edited by Brian; 02-02-2014 at 04:25 PM.
    Digital: Nikon DF,Nikon D1x, Nikon D1, Nikon E3, Leica M Monochrom, Leica M9, Leica M8.
    Film: Most every Nikon from the Nikon M through to the F3HP.

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Roy1961's Avatar

    Re: Tips on using manual mode?

    my tip is NOT to give up, keep trying until you get it, think it took me about 6 weeks until everything clicked, lost lots of shots, went from black pics to white to ones that looked like i was in a 9.0 earthquake, now i shoot in this mode everyday, everyone goes through this, you will get it. Learn from the pics you take that are bad.
    Learn to laugh at yourself, everyone else is.
    D500, D7000. SB700.

    Nikkor 18-105mm, 35mm, 70-300mm and Sigma 50-500.

    LowePro 202 Slingshot bag, Wimberley Gimbal head, Benro Carbon Fiber Tripod.

    Vanguard Alta 263 Tripod with SBH-250 ballhead, Vanguard AM 263 Monopod with SBH-100 ballhead.

  5. #15
    Happy to be Canadian
    Super Mod
    Marcel's Avatar

    Re: Tips on using manual mode?

    If your going manual is serious, yoiu might as well get an incident lightmeter and forget the camera's meter. Reflective metering can so easily be fooled by the subject's nature that sometimes the Aperture or Shutter speed priority in matrix metering is your best starting point. From there you can learn to correct the exposure depending on your subjects.
    I'm beginning to see the LIGHT!
    Please visit my Gallery and my Flickr Gallery

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Brian's Avatar

    Re: Tips on using manual mode?

    The first Nikon F Photomic came with an incident metering attachment, it has an external sensor. I always used it at airshows. Worked great.

    Ebay is loaded with hand-held meters. I use a Weston Master 715 that is about 70 years old with my meterless cameras. It had been in its box, so the Selenium cell meter is still accurate. With several meters that use batteries: stay away from those that use Mercury cells. replacements exist, but do not last as long.

    This link- "Just a Random Ebay Auction", shows the Weston Master II (The 735) with incident light meter attachment.

    Tips on using manual mode?Weston Master II Universal Exposure Meter Vintage and Antique Works | eBay
    Digital: Nikon DF,Nikon D1x, Nikon D1, Nikon E3, Leica M Monochrom, Leica M9, Leica M8.
    Film: Most every Nikon from the Nikon M through to the F3HP.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    ShootRaw's Avatar

    Re: Tips on using manual mode?

    A handheld light meter is not a must..Matrix does just fine...
    Nikon D810 / D750 / Nikkor 24mm-70mm 2.8 G / Nikkor 85mm 1.4 G / Einstein 640ws Strobe / 22 inch Beauty Dish

  8. #18
    Senior Member

    Re: Tips on using manual mode?

    thanks a lot everyone.





Quick Reply Quick Reply

If you are already a member, please login above before posting.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •