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  1. #11
    Senior Member

    Re: Low Light ISO Setting D750

    Quote Originally Posted by TieuNgao View Post
    I've taken the same picture at different ISO 6400, 3200, and 1600. Manual mode (S=1/40, A=7.1), on tripod and the same frame.
    ...and added 1 and 2 EV for the pictures with ISO3200 and 1600, respectively, before converting to jpg.
    As far as my eyes tell me they look the same!
    And they should look the same. The answer is in your post.

    The amount of light hitting the sensor is exactly the same in all three shots. Same shutter speed, same aperture. By adjusting the camera's ISO, all you're doing is telling the camera what the final shot should look like.

    If you take the RAW 1600 file and turn up exposure two stops in Lightroom, all you're doing is turning up the ISO to 6400, except you are doing that step in post processing. With the exact same light information as a picture shot at 6400 in camera, you should get the same result.

    Paul says he sees differences, but I suspect they have more to do with your auto noise reduction.

    J-See could explain it better. I did these exact same tests as you when he explained that he set his shutter speed and aperture where they had to be to catch birds in flight, then he did all of his ISO adjustment in post.


    › See More: Low Light ISO Setting D750



  2. #12
    Senior Member

    Re: Low Light ISO Setting D750

    Quote Originally Posted by NikonShutterBug View Post
    My first thought was, this is backwards??? Shouldn't the D750 have the faster shutter speeds at the same ISO, due to the better sensor?
    They should have exactly the same shutter speed at the same ISO. The better sensor doesn't change the exposure. The better sensor will give you more light catching and/or processing abilities in low light (meaning you're using a higher ISO), exactly as you discovered. In fact, if all cameras are properly calibrated, all cameras and light meters should meter a constant scene the same. F16 and shutter speed of 1/100 should be the norm shooting ISO 100 in bright sunlight.

    I think your differences in shutter speeds between the two bodies was explained by WayneF.

    Hope you are loving that D750! Keep up the experiments.

  3. #13
    Senior Member

    Re: Low Light ISO Setting D750

    Quote Originally Posted by Blade Canyon View Post
    And they should look the same. The answer is in your post.

    The amount of light hitting the sensor is exactly the same in all three shots. Same shutter speed, same aperture. By adjusting the camera's ISO, all you're doing is telling the camera what the final shot should look like.

    If you take the RAW 1600 file and turn up exposure two stops in Lightroom, all you're doing is turning up the ISO to 6400, except you are doing that step in post processing. With the exact same light information as a picture shot at 6400 in camera, you should get the same result.

    Paul says he sees differences, but I suspect they have more to do with your auto noise reduction.

    J-See could explain it better. I did these exact same tests as you when he explained that he set his shutter speed and aperture where they had to be to catch birds in flight, then he did all of his ISO adjustment in post.
    My point is that if they look the same (they do to my eyes) then I'd rather do it in the post; meaning I'd shoot at 1 or 2 EV under-exposure by using lower ISO to have, in theory, better DR, tonal range, and color sensitivity. Another bonus by doing that is less chance to blow the highlights.
    Thanks/Like Blade Canyon Thanks/liked this post
     

  4. #14
    Senior Member

    Re: Low Light ISO Setting D750

    Quote Originally Posted by TieuNgao View Post
    My point is that if they look the same (they do to my eyes) then I'd rather do it in the post; meaning I'd shoot at 1 or 2 EV under-exposure by using lower ISO to have, in theory, better DR, tonal range, and color sensitivity. Another bonus by doing that is less chance to blow the highlights.
    This highly technical article suggests your image quality will be better if you put the ISO close to where it should be, without clipping.

    theory.uchicago.edu/~ejm/pix/20d/tests/noise/

    And here's the most relevant quotation from that article:

    "Bottom line: Read noise at high ISO is much smaller than read noise at low ISO, in terms of the error in photon counting that it represents. Thus, better image quality is obtained for using the highest ISO for which the signal is not clipped."





  5. #15
    Senior Member

    Re: Low Light ISO Setting D750

    Quote Originally Posted by Blade Canyon View Post


    This highly technical article suggests your image quality will be better if you put the ISO close to where it should be, without clipping.

    theory.uchicago.edu/~ejm/pix/20d/tests/noise/

    And here's the most relevant quotation from that article:

    "Bottom line: Read noise at high ISO is much smaller than read noise at low ISO, in terms of the error in photon counting that it represents. Thus, better image quality is obtained for using the highest ISO for which the signal is not clipped."

    Just below the "Bottom line" you quoted from that article, you'll see the graph 15a for Canon 1D3 where it clearly shows that at ISO 800-1300 the read noise is almost constant, and from ISO 1600 and beyond the read noise stays the same. That's why the next paragraph says:

    "Note that the expansion on the bottom end of the range yields less and less as ISO is increased more and more -- going from ISO 100 to ISO 200 yields a big improvement at the lower end of exposure (at the cost of some latitude at the upper end); on the other hand, going from ISO 800 to 1600 doesn't make much difference at all in shadow S/N, and in addition one loses an entire stop of raw headroom. Above ISO 1600 there is no expansion of the shadow range whatsoever, just more and more lost from the top end. The ISO 3200 curve of the 1D3 isn't even plotted above, because it lies almost exactly on top of the ISO 1600 curve, apart from ending one stop earlier ot the top end. This is why it makes no sense to use absurdly high ISO's like 6400 if one uses raw capture -- it just throws away highlight headroom without getting anything back at the shadow end; it's better to underexpose by a stop or two at ISO 1600 if the shutter speed is needed, than to use higher ISO."
    Thanks/Like Blade Canyon Thanks/liked this post
     

  6. #16
    Senior Member

    Re: Low Light ISO Setting D750

    Very good attention to detail!

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    NikonShutterBug's Avatar

    Re: Low Light ISO Setting D750

    Thanks guys for the education, I really enjoyed all of the comments. I am absolutely enjoying the D750. Wow what an amazing camera, and with proper direction from the Nikonites I am starting to create some nice photography. Nikonites, thanks so much for sharing.
    Thanks/Like Don Kuykendall, Metal Jacket Thanks/liked this post
     
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  8. #18
    Banned

    Re: Low Light ISO Setting D750

    Sent you a PM with further setting advice.





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