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  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Vixen's Avatar

    Re: Dirty Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick M View Post
    That is pretty significant, like a swipe from a cleaning brush was left to dry and I'm sure it wasn't. The spots above remind me of the D600 oil splatter issue, but the concentration is remarkable. The VD products worked great on the D600 oil issue. If a good scrubbing with the VD product doesn't work, I'd try professional cleaning. I have some left for oil stains I'd send you if you like, I no longer need to clean my sensors.
    Thanks...I'm thinking maybe oil too. I looked at photos before this attempted clean and that black streak actually is worse now after cleaning, while the random spots are marginally better, but nothing remarkable, so I think not dust but either oil or salt ( I use my camera on the beach a lot), both of which are not easy to remove. My swab was definitely not dry and I did 4 passes, so it SHOULD have cleaned it


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    Vixen
    -----------------------------------------------

    Nikon D80 and Nikon D7100
    Nikkor 18-55mm & Nikkor 70-200mm kit lenses
    Nikkor 105mm macro lens
    Tamron 18-270mm zoom
    Tamron 150-600mm zoom
    Tokina 12-24mm wide angle



  2. #12
    Senior Member
    480sparky's Avatar

    Re: Dirty Sensor

    Whatever it is, you shouldn't need any magnifiers to see it. I should stand out like a school bus.
    Thanks/Like aporodagon Thanks/liked this post
     
    Don't mind me... I'm out roaming around somewhere between Zone III and VII.


    Go forth and actuate!


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  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Vixen's Avatar

    Re: Dirty Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by 480sparky View Post
    Whatever it is, you shouldn't need any magnifiers to see it. I should stand out like a school bus.
    It isn't though, that's the worrying thing.
    I'm just waiting on the new cleaning solution, which is probably a week away now. Meantime I'm off for a week on our boat. Hopefully we'll get good enough weather to get out of the marina to the islands. Been way too windy overnight for anchoring up out in the bay lately
    Vixen
    -----------------------------------------------

    Nikon D80 and Nikon D7100
    Nikkor 18-55mm & Nikkor 70-200mm kit lenses
    Nikkor 105mm macro lens
    Tamron 18-270mm zoom
    Tamron 150-600mm zoom
    Tokina 12-24mm wide angle

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    spb_stan's Avatar

    Re: Dirty Sensor

    If you have a chemical supply house in the area just get a small bottle of Methanol, a very simple alcohol. That is the only ingredient in Eclipse sensor cleaner, saves you $25 or more. It is a very good solvent and dries without residue but as with most solvent, it is flammable so don't light a match around the open bottle. Any alcohol based solvent should not be left open at all because it absorbs moisture from the air which reduces its effectiveness in cleaning without streaks and increases evaporation time. Get reagent grade Methanol for greatest purity and lowest water content. It should be cheap.
    Some contaminants will not be dissolved by alcohol but will be by distilled water. If you need to use distilled water apply is with the lightly moistened applicator and clean normally and then do it again using the alcohol only. Water is absorbed by the alcohol.

    The dirt does not look like any normal dirt. Is this photo of the sensor itself or by the sensor? If it is on the sensor itself, it should be visible with the unaided eye.
    Thanks/Like Marcel, Vixen Thanks/liked this post
     

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Vixen's Avatar

    Re: Dirty Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by spb_stan View Post
    If you have a chemical supply house in the area just get a small bottle of Methanol, a very simple alcohol. That is the only ingredient in Eclipse sensor cleaner, saves you $25 or more. It is a very good solvent and dries without residue but as with most solvent, it is flammable so don't light a match around the open bottle. Any alcohol based solvent should not be left open at all because it absorbs moisture from the air which reduces its effectiveness in cleaning without streaks and increases evaporation time. Get reagent grade Methanol for greatest purity and lowest water content. It should be cheap.
    Some contaminants will not be dissolved by alcohol but will be by distilled water. If you need to use distilled water apply is with the lightly moistened applicator and clean normally and then do it again using the alcohol only. Water is absorbed by the alcohol.

    The dirt does not look like any normal dirt. Is this photo of the sensor itself or by the sensor? If it is on the sensor itself, it should be visible with the unaided eye.
    I don't have a chemical supplier nearby. I DO have a bottle of ethanol in my cupboard tho. To be honest I've always bought & used sensor cleaner because I obviously don't want to ruin my sensor. I didn't know you could use water on it either, so thanks for that info.

    I'm not quite sure what you are asking about the photo. It's a photo taken by my camera. Like I said, I cannot see anything on my sensor even with a magnifier but there are still spots on my photos, so obviously still dirt on the sensor and my eyesight can be pretty crappy at times sadly
    Vixen
    -----------------------------------------------

    Nikon D80 and Nikon D7100
    Nikkor 18-55mm & Nikkor 70-200mm kit lenses
    Nikkor 105mm macro lens
    Tamron 18-270mm zoom
    Tamron 150-600mm zoom
    Tokina 12-24mm wide angle

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    spb_stan's Avatar

    Re: Dirty Sensor

    Ethanol is not a good substitute for the simpler molecule of Methanol, that evaporate much faster and cleaner since it is less hydroscopic. The surface of the sensor has a filter, not an AA filter, which works by shifting phase of the light passing through it to reducing aliasing by acting as a high Q low pass filter but a protective surface made of the same material as AA filters:LiNbO3 . It is pretty tough, just a little softer than class with a hardness rating of 5Moh (about the same as tooth enamel) and normal window glass is about 5.5Moh. Not many things that are airborne are harder except blowing silica sand which is much harder (7Moh or about 4 times harder than glass) and can scratch the filter surface. With careful cleaning, it is pretty hard to scratch the sensor but it helps to use a new clean swab with each usable because if it sits around you never know what particles stuck to the swab. Probably the most common source of scratches befalls photographers shooting surfing competition...blowing sand,wind and moisture.
    Water will not hurt the surface of the sensor but it could easily get into the electrical connections under the sensor so use of water should be limited to damp, not dripping wet swabs. Unless it is filtered distilled water there is a possibility of leaving water marks (mostly salts) so it is best to clean with alcohol before the water fully evaporates.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Vixen's Avatar

    Re: Dirty Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by spb_stan View Post
    Ethanol is not a good substitute for the simpler molecule of Methanol, that evaporate much faster and cleaner since it is less hydroscopic. The surface of the sensor has a filter, not an AA filter, which works by shifting phase of the light passing through it to reducing aliasing by acting as a high Q low pass filter but a protective surface made of the same material as AA filters:LiNbO3 . It is pretty tough, just a little softer than class with a hardness rating of 5Moh (about the same as tooth enamel) and normal window glass is about 5.5Moh. Not many things that are airborne are harder except blowing silica sand which is much harder (7Moh or about 4 times harder than glass) and can scratch the filter surface. With careful cleaning, it is pretty hard to scratch the sensor but it helps to use a new clean swab with each usable because if it sits around you never know what particles stuck to the swab. Probably the most common source of scratches befalls photographers shooting surfing competition...blowing sand,wind and moisture.
    Water will not hurt the surface of the sensor but it could easily get into the electrical connections under the sensor so use of water should be limited to damp, not dripping wet swabs. Unless it is filtered distilled water there is a possibility of leaving water marks (mostly salts) so it is best to clean with alcohol before the water fully evaporates.
    Thankyou Stan. That is a very good explanation of why and what and very useful. I DO use my camera on the beach a LOT and while I try to be very careful there are often stray grains of sand in my lens mounts etc so totally possible one has gotten inside. I DO blow the processor pretty well before I use a swab and i DO use a clean swab every time and I DO blow that swab to remove any loose fibres etc before using it...so I think I am doing things rightly. I have found salt spray can be quite hard to remove from my lenses, so if any has managed to get into the camera onto the processor I imagine it would be just as hard to remove ( I've found water to be the best thing for it on lenses).

    I figure I just try it again when my new solution arrives, and maybe I will try to source some methanol for future use also. If that black streak remains tho I have no idea. Maybe time for a new camera. It's a good excuse anyway
    Vixen
    -----------------------------------------------

    Nikon D80 and Nikon D7100
    Nikkor 18-55mm & Nikkor 70-200mm kit lenses
    Nikkor 105mm macro lens
    Tamron 18-270mm zoom
    Tamron 150-600mm zoom
    Tokina 12-24mm wide angle

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Vixen's Avatar

    Re: Dirty Sensor

    Sooooooo.............new sensor cleaner did not work. Made it worse in fact. Think I'll try alcohol next although it may be some time until I can get some
    Vixen
    -----------------------------------------------

    Nikon D80 and Nikon D7100
    Nikkor 18-55mm & Nikkor 70-200mm kit lenses
    Nikkor 105mm macro lens
    Tamron 18-270mm zoom
    Tamron 150-600mm zoom
    Tokina 12-24mm wide angle

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    spb_stan's Avatar

    Re: Dirty Sensor

    When you say it made it worse, in what way? Did it smear or grow in the direction of your swab movement? Or did it grow in all directions? If it streaked in the direction of swab movement, that is a pretty good sign it is just stubborn viscous contamination but it just expanded in size without showing signs of smearing, it could be surface damage.

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    mikew's Avatar

    Re: Dirty Sensor

    Quote Originally Posted by Vixen View Post
    Sooooooo.............new sensor cleaner did not work. Made it worse in fact. Think I'll try alcohol next although it may be some time until I can get some
    Getting pi$$ed will not help
    Thanks/Like RocketCowboy, John Thomson Thanks/liked this post
     
    Mike

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/7239177@N07/

    Olympus EM1MK11,Panasonic G80, 12-60mm, 60mm macro, Leica 100-400mm

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