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  1. #1
    Senior Member

    Shadows

    Beginner question...I am having a lot of issues with shadows. When shooting outside, I get them a lot under the chin. When shooting indoors, I still get them under the chin and on the backdrop a lot too. I have a d7100 and altura flash. I use the kit lens. Any suggestions and advice would be greatly appreciated!

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  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Bikerbrent's Avatar

    Re: Shadows

    Is the flash mounted on your camera? If so you need to get it off the camera. Even hand held off to the side is an improvement. Also, when shooting with sufficient available light, use the flash as a fill flash, not the main light source. Also google "flash photography tutorial for beginner," and you will lots to choose from.
    Thanks/Like Amy, RocketCowboy Thanks/liked this post
     
    Brent: Poway, CA
    D7200, D200, F100
    Tokina 12-24mm
    Nikon 18-200mm
    Tokina 28-70mm f2.6-2.8
    Nikon 80-200mm f2.8
    Sigma 150-600mm
    Nikon 50 AF f1.8
    Tokina 100mm f2.8 Macro
    Nikon SB800

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Bikerbrent's Avatar

    Re: Shadows

    Oh, Welcome aboard Amy. Enjoy the ride.
    Brent: Poway, CA
    D7200, D200, F100
    Tokina 12-24mm
    Nikon 18-200mm
    Tokina 28-70mm f2.6-2.8
    Nikon 80-200mm f2.8
    Sigma 150-600mm
    Nikon 50 AF f1.8
    Tokina 100mm f2.8 Macro
    Nikon SB800

  4. #4
    Staff
    Challenge Team
    Super Mod
    RocketCowboy's Avatar

    Re: Shadows

    Howdy and welcome to Nikonites!

    As @Bikerbrent suggested, without seeing example images of what you're getting, it sounds like getting your flash off camera and metering more for fill instead of key lighting from the flash will be your biggest help.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Scott Murray's Avatar

    Re: Shadows

    A large diffuser on your flash close to the subject will also help in reducing harsh shadows.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Needa's Avatar

    Re: Shadows

    If you don't have a diffuser try bounce flash. Bounce flash off ceiling or wall to diffuse it.













  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Horoscope Fish's Avatar

    Re: Shadows

    Quote Originally Posted by Amy View Post
    Beginner question...I am having a lot of issues with shadows. When shooting outside, I get them a lot under the chin. When shooting indoors, I still get them under the chin and on the backdrop a lot too. I have a d7100 and altura flash. I use the kit lens. Any suggestions and advice would be greatly appreciated!

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    I too would suggest learning how to bounce your flash. This assumes the head of your flash tilts.

    Another good thing to try is using the Flash Compensation button. I pretty routinely reduce the flash compensation by about 1.5 Stops. This is easy to do by pressing and holding the button that activates the flash and turning the Command Wheel to increase or decrease the amount of compensation. This is entirely different from Exposure Compensation. You'll see the setting change in the top-mounted LCD. Use the setting that works for you but I've found somewhere between one and two stops works well.

    Here's a good site to help you come to grips with using your flash: Flash Photography Techniques
    Last edited by Horoscope Fish; 02-23-2017 at 02:14 PM.
    ~ Paul
    ....
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    Primary Kit :: D850, Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 G2, Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 G2, Sigma 135mm f/1.8 Art, Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art,
    Godox Flashes & Triggers, Manfrotto X055PROB, 3-Legged Thing Airhed II... All Stuffed into a Manfrotto Pro Backpack 50
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  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Just-Clayton's Avatar

    Re: Shadows

    If doing portraits, get a soft box and remotes. I invested in on and clears up the shadows.
    Always jump in feet first! You never know how deep the water is!!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Moab Man's Avatar

    Re: Shadows

    A white reflector held under the chin area will help to soften those shadows by reflecting light up into the dark areas. This is in addition to better use of the flash through bouncing or a softbox of some sort. However, an example picture and we could give more specific input.
    Thanks/Like RocketCowboy Thanks/liked this post
     
    D5100, D7100, D600, D750, Df
    Lenses: Nikon DX 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 55-300mm, Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD & 200-500mm
    Prime: Nikon 35mm, 50mm, & 85mm f/1.8G, 300mm f/4
    Wide Angle: Tokina AT-X116 Pro DX-II 11-16mm f/2.8, Rokinon f/2.8 14mm (chipped)
    Macro: Nikon 40mm, Tamron 90mm
    ​Flash: Nissin MARK II Di622
    Stuff: Expodisc Neutral & Portrait
    ​Editing: CS6, CC, Nik Tools, Portrait Pro 12, Topaz
    Spyder4Pro
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/122672034@N04/

  10. #10
    Senior Member

    Re: Shadows

    Quote Originally Posted by Moab Man View Post
    A white reflector held under the chin area will help to soften those shadows by reflecting light up into the dark areas. This is in addition to better use of the flash through bouncing or a softbox of some sort. However, an example picture and we could give more specific input.
    This was my thought as well. I have a couple of fold up reflectors that are white on one side and silver on the other. They are light and cheap and they go everywhere I take my gear.
    Tommy C. D500 and usually a Nikkor 200-500mm f/5.6

    -If there truly are two types of people in this world, strive to be neither.- Me





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