+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 13 of 13
  1. #11
    Staff
    Super Mod
    Don Kuykendall's Avatar

    Re: Upgrade to FX from D7000

    Quote Originally Posted by Fortkentdad View Post
    once you see FX in your future getting good glass is critical. a good 70-200 is one of the standards, a nice niffty 50 is a great addition and probably the least costly bit of fx glass you will ever get. depending on your lens lust fx glass costs far more than your body but should last longer

    I started off with the 24-120 to replace my 18-140 on my D7100. It is a good all around lens on the D750 but I really did miss the wide portion on the D7100. I use my 16-28 on my
    D750 more than any other lens. I really like the wide angle shots. So the choice of lenses is all dependent on your shooting habits and your budget. FX glass is expensive.


    › See More: Upgrade to FX from D7000

    ================================================== ============================
    D750***D7100***24-120 f/4 ***70-300***Tamron 150-600***Tokina 16-28 f2.8***50mm f/1.8***Photoshop/Lightroom CC



  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Fortkentdad's Avatar

    Re: Upgrade to FX from D7000

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Kuykendall View Post
    I started off with the 24-120 to replace my 18-140 on my D7100. It is a good all around lens on the D750 but I really did miss the wide portion on the D7100. I use my 16-28 on my
    D750 more than any other lens. I really like the wide angle shots. So the choice of lenses is all dependent on your shooting habits and your budget. FX glass is expensive.
    For sure, I have a 17-35 Tamron FX lens and use it a lot - the 24-70 2.8 is a superior lens but much heavier and the difference on an FX between 17 and 24 is noticeable. Received a Siggy Artsy 50 1.4 for Christmas and love it - works well on FX and DX. Same goes for my 85 1.8. Generally FX lenses are fine on a DX, but you do pay that FX premium in most cases.

    I had some older AF-D lenses that are still good glass and can be had for far less. And they tended to be much smaller than todays - in part because they have not focus motor, V.C. and other bells. Just good glass. I gave these to my daughter-in-law with my D90 as she is interested in the hobby. But good vintage lenses are one way to go FX on a budget. I still look for a bargain.
    FKD Alberta Canada

    D500, D610, D7100, D5100

    Nikkor FX:
    AFS 60mm 2.8, AFS 85mm 1.8, AFD 105 2.8, AFS 70-200 2.8 VRI, AFS 200-500 5.6.
    Nikkor DX: AFS 16-85 VR, AFS VR 55-300, AFS 35mm 1.8.
    Tamron: SP 24-70 2.8, SP 70-300 4-5.6, SP 17-35 2.8-4
    Tokina: ATX 11-20 2.8, Sigma: Art 50 1.4
    Lensbaby Composer Pro with collection of optics & 5.8 F/3.5 Fisheye,
    Kenko 300 DGX 1.4X & 2X TC
    SB-400, 600 & 700, Metz 58 AF2, Godox AD360, 2 x V860, V350
    and Benro Transfunctional Travel Angel to watch over me

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    spb_stan's Avatar

    Re: Upgrade to FX from D7000

    First post, and being a contrarian: I did not read anything in your post that suggests that you have exhausted the D7000 or doing something that would give visually more compelling images going to FX. It is expensive and it is very rare a subject or print size that a difference can be seen. If you really want to extend your photography, camera bodies are not the answer, lighting and lenses however are a much better investment for best return. A couple good primes, such as any of the excellent f/1.8G primes will be a big step up over the slow zooms. For example if you do portraits, a 85 1.8G is really hard to beat for less than 2-3 times the price and gives a field of view on DX that is very nice for head shots.
    Lighting is the best return on investment, better than lenses in value. A few speed lights and low cost flash controllers and a few modifiers can result in pro studio images with a bit of learning and practice and only cost a couple hundred dollars.
    Can you post an image you like but feel would be more compelling shot with Fx?
    Regarding the cameras, every one mentions is better than the D700 for image quality but the D700 is a great handling camera. If it fails however, many of its parts are becoming unavailable. If you are serious about fine art, stock, studio work, the D800, used is the best deal. If you want a general purpose Fx, the D750 is an excellent performer. The image quality of the D610 for general photography is excellent also and a used one is a bargain.
    IF you want to spend $5000 on lenses and a used FX body, and not hurt, go for it but if you are tight for the lens investment, don't move to FX. The lenses you want are all well over $1000 each. Closer to $2000.

    Regarding image quality, any camera made is easily capable to capturing any image you see on gallery walls. It is NOT the camera that makes the images worth viewing. I switched from film to DSLR only 10 years ago and had no F mount lenses but build up a decent collection of fx lenses and have at least $15,000 invested to cover what you have now.The lenses I would like, I can't afford...like but not need. If starting with digital now, I would stay with Dx until needed if ever, and get a few very good lenses and 1 light general purpose zoom: 20 1.8g, 35 1.8g 85 1.8g and a light slow aperture plastic zoom. If doing more landscape, an ultrawide zoom like a 10-20 or 1-24. Aperture is not terribly important on an ultrawide since landscape is usually done on a tripod and longer exposures stopped down is the norm. The light 1.8G lenses listed about are better than any zoom. There might not been a better AF 20mm lens in existence than that Nikon 20. I have the very good 14-24 2.8 and at 20mm that low cost prime is better in all respects.

    Lets hear more of what you are shooting and in what conditions, and see some images you think would be better with Fx. We might be able to help you up your game and save you a lot of money.





Quick Reply Quick Reply

If you are already a member, please login above before posting.

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •