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  1. #71
    Senior Member
    mikew's Avatar

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Quote Originally Posted by blackstar View Post
    Yeah, that's from street lamps probably...
    Should have realized you are only testing certain things, done that myself and some smart ar$e like me comes along and points out the obvious, sorry put it down to boredom on my part


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    Mike



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  2. #72
    Staff
    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Do you have Active D Lighting turned on? If you are shooting jpegs and it's on, turn it off and try again.
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2020 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  3. #73
    Senior Member

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Thanks, Cindy.

    I'll try that next time. For the experiment, I shot fine RAW & jpg in M mode. I still don't quite understand how "Active D Lighting" works with any shot and makes any effects (like broke)? From the Manual, it states: Active D-Lighting preserves details in highlights and shadows, creating photographs with natural contrast. Use for high contrast scenes, for example when photographing brightly lit outdoor scenery through a door or window or taking pictures of shaded subjects on a sunny day. Active D-Lighting is not recommended in mode M; in other modes, it is most effective when used with L (Matrix metering; 0 Metering). And there's the remark: "With some subjects, you may notice uneven shading, shadows around bright objects, or halos around dark objects." It is not clear this remark statement refer to when ADL is on or off. I suppose it's for ADL on and that the light reflections in my experimental images are the "halos" effect of ADL?

    My main thought on the experimental shots is: considering the iso and speed I set, although higher iso and lower speed make the whole sky brighter (first image), stars are also brighter and sharper (if look carefully). I think the point is it's the right setting for the faraway stars and it can be post-processed to make the sky darker if desired.

    I am still puzzled and not sure how a nature new moon showed up as a bright star in the images? Maybe too high iso? I think I had tried my best on focusing. Any one?

  4. #74
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    The moon: Probably a combo of overexposure and lack of sharp focus. Turns the crescent into a bright airy disc. Did the moon look sharp in the viewfinder? If so, then it probably just way over exposed from the long exposure. Shooting at the moon is like shooting at a light bulb.

    Just want to add that I didn't look at the moon last night, but if there was any Earthshine on it where the dark side was still kind of lit up, then that will add to your exposure problem.

    But, hey. That last image with the long exposure kind of made a secant from the airplane. Ha.
    Last edited by Dawg Pics; 12-31-2019 at 08:13 PM.
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100
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  5. #75
    Staff
    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Quote Originally Posted by blackstar View Post
    Thanks, Cindy.

    I'll try that next time. For the experiment, I shot fine RAW & jpg in M mode. I still don't quite understand how "Active D Lighting" works with any shot and makes any effects (like broke)?
    It makes a moon look fuzzy around the edges, and even with RAW images, Active-D lighting will affect the file. But if you had it turned off, then it's from something else. I remember posting a pic here years ago of the moon when Active-D lighting was on. Anyway, I hope you find your solution!
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2020 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  6. #76
    Senior Member

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    If you are trying to shoot the moon- like to show texture on the surface, set the aperture to f8, iso 800 and 1/800 shutter speed. These are my base settings for the moon and typically play around from there.
    If you are shooting stars, open the aperture up as much as possible, set the shutter to 10, 15 or maybe 20 seconds and the iso to 1600- 3200+. With these settings, the moon will reflect too much light into the lens and all detail is blown out, so its best left out of the frame.
    The halos you are seeing in the bottom right side of your frame is called lens flare. Its from having a bright light source bounce the reflection off several layers of lenses inside your lens. Correct this by moving the light source further out of your frame.

    Also, if you have the camera set to ADL, I dont think you can have it set to record in RAW as well. No bother, typically the areas that are too shaded for a typical shot can be brought back in lightroom. I rarely use ADL -unless your shooting a group of people at night in a doorway and want detail on both the light and dark side of the door out of camera. Its more of a JPG feature. The way to do that with RAW would be to shoot an under exposed image and then an over exposed image (or a combo of several at different exposures) and then use "image stacking" in Lightroom. That way, you keep all the data from the RAW files instead of a single baked image the camera thinks you want.

  7. #77
    Senior Member

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    @dawg, I didn't look in the viewfinder, just live view. But I am pretty sure now the moon problem is caused by high iso and long speed... and maybe ADL also, and it was a helicopter flying there...
    @hark (Cindy), Oh, I have ADL on all the time since I got my D3500.. and I checked RAW images and they also have the same halos and bright shining moon Would you mind let me know which sub-forum and thread you posted your moon image with ADL on? I like to check it out. Tks
    @TwistedThrottle, Thanks for the tip for moon shooting. Since the new moon was bit small and less bright, I set the exposure to the midway of shooting stars... and yet, this is just experimental shots under non-ideal conditions (city with lot light pollution and less bright stars), but still good experience and learning. As for the ADL effects, I am not very concerned as long as knowing how it gets there and how to avoid it (by away from those light sources) except if the moon problem is caused (alone or combined with other factors) by this ADL setting. AW, I set ADL to off since we started discussing ADL.

    My next experiment may be taken at a neighborhood park keeping city light a further away and picking a night without moon. And try shooting with no or little ground scene.

    Thank you, everybody and Happy New Year!

  8. #78
    Senior Member
    Moab Man's Avatar

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps
    Because the moon is a reflector bouncing the light of the sun you will be closer to shooting a daylight shot than the settings of a night shot. The stars showed up because a sensor is more like a glue tape that is collecting light that you can't see until it becomes visible on the sensor. When I shoot the Moon I'm at 1/640 f/8 iso 250. But that is exposing for the moon. This is why the stars don't show up in an exposed for the moon shot.

    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps-w_500_2613.jpg
    Thanks/Like blackstar Thanks/liked this post
     
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  9. #79
    Senior Member

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Hi Moab,

    Wow! I like your moon shot and the explanation. Just wondering when you took the shot, how big the moon in your bare eyes? Could you see (from bare eyes) all the details as in the photo? I only have another Nikon DX 70-300mm. Guess if I zoom into 250mm, I will get a moon only a quarter size as in your photo? That's a pity! Oh, well...

  10. #80
    Senior Member
    Moab Man's Avatar

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Quote Originally Posted by blackstar View Post
    Hi Moab,

    Wow! I like your moon shot and the explanation. Just wondering when you took the shot, how big the moon in your bare eyes? Could you see (from bare eyes) all the details as in the photo? I only have another Nikon DX 70-300mm. Guess if I zoom into 250mm, I will get a moon only a quarter size as in your photo? That's a pity! Oh, well...
    The moon was no bigger or smaller than any other night. Hype around, it's the closest it will be means nothing. The distance is to far away to matter. As to all the detail, it's because I have cut down the light that washes out the detail you don't see. Cold winter nights, when the stars are not twinkling, are the best nights to shoot the moon. Twinkling of the stars is air disturbance disrupting lights path. Full moons are actually the worst to shoot, they show the least detail.
    D5100, D7100, D600, D750, Df
    Lenses: Nikon DX 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 55-300mm, Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD & 200-500mm
    Prime: Nikon 35mm, 50mm, & 85mm f/1.8G, 300mm f/4
    Wide Angle: Tokina AT-X116 Pro DX-II 11-16mm f/2.8, Rokinon f/2.8 14mm (chipped)
    Macro: Nikon 40mm, Tamron 90mm
    ​Flash: Nissin MARK II Di622
    Stuff: Expodisc Neutral & Portrait
    ​Editing: CS6, CC, Nik Tools, Portrait Pro 12, Topaz
    Spyder4Pro
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/





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