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  1. #91
    Senior Member

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Thanks, Cindy. Oh, I mean before, not after, shooting... (Need to focus on a clear, not foggy, moon, right?) So go waiting.


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    Last edited by blackstar; 01-03-2020 at 05:25 AM.



  2. #92
    Staff
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    hark's Avatar

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps
    Quote Originally Posted by blackstar View Post
    Thanks, Cindy. Oh, I mean before, not after, shooting... (Need to focus on a clear, not foggy, moon, right?) So go waiting.
    Quote Originally Posted by Moab Man View Post

    Here are a few images, and although I don't remember all the settings, each one was shot at f/2.8.

    Focus for this image was on the tent and people and I was about 40-50 feet away. At this distance everything falls into focus - hyperfocus.

    Attachment 327030
    To answer your question, I'm going back to Moab Man's earlier post. He mentioned using f/2.8 and focusing on the tent which was about 40 feet away. He said at that distance, everything falls into focus (meaning everything up to infinity that is beyond the focus point).

    I use Simple Depth of Field which is a phone app. I plugged in a Nikon DX body along with f/2.8, a 14mm lens, and focusing at a distance of 40 feet. Below is a screen shot that shows you the info. So my suggestion is to use the widest lens available at the widest aperture, and focus on something closer to the ground that's 40 to 50 feet away. Once you have achieved focus, flip the switch on your lens or body to manual focus so the focus point won't change. Then take your shots. Be SURE to flip your switch back to AF when you are finished. I'm saying that because I've *Been there, done that* and regretted not noticing I was still in manual focus. Nothing like losing the chance to take a great shot if you don't remember to switch back.

    If you let me know the widest lens you own along with its widest aperture, I can plug in some values to my app and find a distance where everything falls into infinity. Then I can take a screen shot showing you the info based on your gear. Hopefully that will allow you to take pics even when it's foggy.

    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps-infinite.png
    Thanks/Like blackstar Thanks/liked this post
     
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2020 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  3. #93
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    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    There might be another option. If your lens has some type of distance scale on it, read the directions on how to understand it. You should be able to set the lens (in manual focus) by using the scale. But like I said, let me know your widest lens and its widest aperture, and I can plug in the info to my app. Once you determine where infinity will work based on distance, you should be able to just set the lens manually with your hands based on its distance scale.

    Personally I don't use the distance scale. When I shot 35mm, I absolutely did and would set my lens for a hyperfocal distance. But with these newer DSLR lenses, they cut back on the info contained in the distance scale. They aren't nearly as comprehensive as they used to be.
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2020 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  4. #94
    Senior Member

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Oh, thank you so much, Cindy -- for all the detailed explanations and helpful information. I have studied about hyperfocal distance earlier and got the photopills app finding the HD for my camera & lens as 4.66m (all in my previous post). And I already experimented with that to somewhat satisfying, not ideal though, outcome: since D3500's mechanics in auto-focus is very sensitive to moving and vibrating, once auto-focusing to hyperfocal distance is done and mode changed to "M", the focus ring would at least swing a little out of focus. But it is still close at HD and I can do some micro-focusing to make sure everything (stars) in focus. I think I have mostly (not completely and perfectly) done my work on focusing infinity for preparing night star shoot. The other night's moon shooting practice came with some focusing issue that, I think, was due to natural foggy conditions. I picked one bad night after all. Now I am also dipping into learning post-processing. So many things to study, learn, and experimenting on photography! I am taking all in hard fashion, but enjoying them at the same time. Wish me luck.

  5. #95
    Senior Member

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Hi Cindy,

    I saw and read your "Hark 2020" post. Thought my newbie's question is somewhat irrelevant to your post there, so here I go: Do you regularly take shot in "Manual" mode or "auto-focus" mode? If "M" mode, how do you decide setting on exposure (i.e., speed, aperture, iso) for each occasion? Take example of the one in your "Hark 2020" post. Thank you for helping me learn.

  6. #96
    Staff
    Super Mod
    hark's Avatar

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps
    Quote Originally Posted by blackstar View Post
    Hi Cindy,

    I saw and read your "Hark 2020" post. Thought my newbie's question is somewhat irrelevant to your post there, so here I go: Do you regularly take shot in "Manual" mode or "auto-focus" mode? If "M" mode, how do you decide setting on exposure (i.e., speed, aperture, iso) for each occasion? Take example of the one in your "Hark 2020" post. Thank you for helping me learn.
    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps-_dsc0040-low-res.jpg

    This must be the image to which you referred. My first true learning experience with photography was by using a Minolta 35mm film camera that focused manually. It only offered two modes: Aperture Priority and Manual Mode. For anyone who really wants to understand photography, weaning off of the Auto or Program Modes won't be easy initially but very rewarding in the end.

    As in my old 35mm film days, I still only use either Aperture Priority or Manual Modes. The one difference now is when I shoot in Manual Mode, I use Auto-ISO much more than shooting in full manual.

    The information you are seeking is called the Exposure Triangle. And that is finding a 3-way balance between the aperture setting, the shutter speed, and the ISO to yield a properly exposed photo.

    By the way, the only time I focus manually is for one of these reasons: when I shoot macro, or if I am in a low-light situation where the AF has trouble achieving focus, or any time I need to override the AF and specifically hone my focus point (which is seldom). For all else I use AF.

    If I am shooting a moving subject and need to be sure of my speed, I shoot in Manual Mode with Auto-ISO. That would be for birds, boats on the water, and anything else that moves. For birds, I know I need a minimum shutter speed of 1/1000" or 1/1250" up to 1/2000" to freeze movement when they are flying. The closer they are to you, a faster shutter speed will be necessary.

    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps-_dsc1675-low-res.jpg

    For boats, I usually stick with 1/1000" or 1/1250". And that's because the boats are further away so their movement across my viewfinder is slower compared to a bird flying by that might be closer.

    BUT...there are times when I want to capture a boat going down the river and have the background appear with sideways streaks. That involves a technique called Panning which uses a slower shutter speed and moving the body/camera sideways while keeping the subject in the center of the frame. For panning, I try to stay between 1/15" and 1/60".

    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps-289514d1529109233-hark-2018-dsc_0157-low-res.jpg

    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps-289515d1529109252-hark-2018-dsc_0200-low-res.jpg

    So these last three images were shot in Manual Mode with Auto-ISO.

    When I shoot in Aperture Priority (meaning speed isn't a concern), I tend to set my ISO at 640 for daytime shots (no Auto-ISO for me in Aperture Priority although it's definitely an option for those who want to use it). Then I keep watch of my shutter speed and determine if my ISO needs to be bumped up or down. My main goal when shooting in Aperture Priority is to decide whether I want a shallow depth of field (aka Selective Focus is the name of this term) as in my first image of the leaves with the bench or if I want everything in the image to be in focus.

    For Selective Focus, the aperture varies depending upon the focal length of the lens used. Longer lens have a shallower DoF (depth of field) than wide angle lenses. So I know I can get away with using an aperture of f/6.3 or even f/7.1 (like I used in the leaf image) when I am using a longer lens and the background is further away. When the background is closer but I want to blur it, then I need to shoot at f/4 or wider open such as f/2.8 or f/1.8 depending on the lens I'm using.

    Apertures that are wide open or close to it offer a shallower depth of field - but how far away the background is from your subject plays a role, too. Apertures such as f/16 or even f/22 or f/32 will allow a much greater DoF. But when you shoot stopped way down at smaller apertures, the quality of sharpness tends goes down. Lenses tend to be sharpest around f/5.6 to f/8. But that is a generalization.

    There's a lot to learn. You might want to look into books by Bryan Peterson. He has some excellent books that explain the differences between wide angle lenses vs. telephoto lenses as well as books on exposure. But getting out of the Auto or Program modes will help you take control of your images and help move you out of the beginner stage to an intermediate level. Lesson over for now. Gotta run.
    Last edited by hark; 01-04-2020 at 03:56 PM.
    Thanks/Like Moab Man, blackstar Thanks/liked this post
     
    Cindy
    Flickr
    and My 2020 Thread

    Where the Spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art
    -- Leonardo da Vinci



  7. #97
    Senior Member

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Hi Cindy,

    Thanks so much for the great lesson. I studied (in theory and some practice) the various methods (settings) for photo shootings in different situations (static, moving, low-light, etc.) as you described. I still need confirmation on the two situations, moving object and selective focus, you would use SP (Shutter priority)+AF+Aiso and AP (Aperture priority)+AF+Aiso.

    Now I realize I had a hard time focusing moon all because two mistakes made: wrong hyperfocal distance (I used long focal length and smaller aperture that makes a far ~150m hyperfocal distance), and AF instead MF (that's why my camera won't take shots when failed to focus).

    For your "Eagle" photo, the shooting information state: focal length=420mm, but lens=300mm. I wonder why?

    Again, thank you so much for all the help.

  8. #98
    Senior Member
    mikew's Avatar

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Quote Originally Posted by blackstar View Post
    Hi Cindy,

    Thanks so much for the great lesson. I studied (in theory and some practice) the various methods (settings) for photo shootings in different situations (static, moving, low-light, etc.) as you described. I still need confirmation on the two situations, moving object and selective focus, you would use SP (Shutter priority)+AF+Aiso and AP (Aperture priority)+AF+Aiso.

    Now I realize I had a hard time focusing moon all because two mistakes made: wrong hyperfocal distance (I used long focal length and smaller aperture that makes a far ~150m hyperfocal distance), and AF instead MF (that's why my camera won't take shots when failed to focus).

    For your "Eagle" photo, the shooting information state: focal length=420mm, but lens=300mm. I wonder why?

    Again, thank you so much for all the help.

    Most likely a 300mm and 1.4 converter
    Mike



    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

    Nikon Z50,Nikon16-50MM,Nikon50-250MM,FTZ Adapter
    Sigma 100-400, Sigma 105mm macro
    Nikon V2,10-30MM,30-110MM FT1 Adapter













  9. #99
    Senior Member

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps
    Here's another experimental shot of star-sky:

    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps-2020-01-09-22.19.53s.jpeg

    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps-2020-01-09-22.20.59s.jpeg

    Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps-2020-01-09-22.21.51s.jpeg

  10. #100
    Senior Member

    re: Newbie's (blackstar) Moon Shot questions and helps

    I see. Thanks, Mike.





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