+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32
  1. #1
    Senior Member

    Lightbulb Out of focus and Over exposure

    Out of focus and Over exposure
    Hi,

    I am a newbie to the DSLR world. My friend recently lent me a DSLR, and I started to play with it. However, I came across couple questions when I used the camera. I appreciate if there is someone who can advise me.

    1. I choose P mode to shot the photo for most of the time. However, sometimes the images are underexposure and sometimes are overexposure. (See photo1) Also, it sometimes show as P* instead of P, can someone help me to figure out what goes wrong?

    Out of focus and Over exposure-dsc_1785.jpg

    2. My subject is often out of focus. (I select single area, autofocus.See photo 2 ) Does anyone have tips?

    Out of focus and Over exposure-dsc_1851.jpg

    Can someone advise? Thank you.


    › See More: Out of focus and Over exposure



  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Moab Man's Avatar

    Re: Out of focus and Over exposure

    What exposure metering is the camera set at? Area? Spot?

    The settings on the first image are kind of crazy. f/25 and an ISO of 400 for what appears to be a bright day? What was the shutter speed?

    Same for the second, shutter speed.
    Thanks/Like wordlesstu Thanks/liked this post
     
    D5100, D7100, D600, D750, Df
    Lenses: Nikon DX 18-55mm, 55-200mm, 55-300mm, Tamron SP 70-300mm F4-5.6 Di VC USD & 200-500mm
    Prime: Nikon 35mm, 50mm, & 85mm f/1.8G, 300mm f/4
    Wide Angle: Tokina AT-X116 Pro DX-II 11-16mm f/2.8, Rokinon f/2.8 14mm (chipped)
    Macro: Nikon 40mm, Tamron 90mm
    ​Flash: Nissin MARK II Di622
    Stuff: Expodisc Neutral & Portrait
    ​Editing: CS6, CC, Nik Tools, Portrait Pro 12, Topaz
    Spyder4Pro
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/122672034@N04/

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Dawg Pics's Avatar

    Re: Out of focus and Over exposure

    The * indicates the camera is in flexible program. I believe it appears when you change the shutter or aperture. Change either and the camera changes the other for you to have equivalent exposure.

    I wonder if the camera is set on Auto ISO since that changed from one image to the next or did you change the ISO setting?

    Would you mind posting one more that shows the subject out of focus?

    Welcome to Nikonites.
    Last edited by Dawg Pics; 03-05-2018 at 06:06 AM.
    Thanks/Like wordlesstu Thanks/liked this post
     
    "Remember to gaze up at the night sky because there is a little bit of the cosmos in each of us."


    Um yeahhhh, I shoot a lot of pics of my dogs.
    D500 (DOB 05/26/17), D300, D80, SB-800. RIP-D100

  4. #4
    Senior Member

    Re: Out of focus and Over exposure

    Out of focus and Over exposure
    Read up on the exposure triangle. It will help a lot.
    Here are some links:
    https://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tu...a-exposure.htm
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8T94sdiNjc

    Metering mode is very important. Spot mode can wildly change your exposure results depending where the spot falls. A wider metering area is a better choice for starting out.
    P mode is very automatic with the ability to shift the program. That is what the * means, you turned the command wheel to shift the program. Exposure is a balance of shutter, aperture and iso. All three come together to 'cook' a perfect exposure based on the meter. Turning the wheel in P mode will shift things around, but still try to keep a balanced exposure. Exposure needs to be correct, but depending what you want, the 3 parameters can be juggled to get the same exposure. The * indicates that you have tweaked the program. You can tweak too much and get poor results. Find the spot where the *p goes out or turn the camera off and on to reset it. Check those links out and tweaking the program will make more sense.
    Focus is another learning project. Stick with single point and make sure its on the face for now. Or on whatever is most important to focus on. Depth of field becomes important here, that is also talked about in the links above. At a low f stop and close distance, only a narrow strip of your subject may be in focus.
    I must have a really good camera.

  5. #5
    Senior Member

    Re: Out of focus and Over exposure

    Hi Moab,

    Thank you for your response. I set on Spot metering. For the first image, is it better to set ISO on 100 or Auto?I don't remember the shutter speed I use. Do you know where I can pull out the information?

    For the second photo, I also don't remember what shutter speed I used. I want to create a depth of field that only focuses on the dog's face, but it didn't work out, and it was out of focus.

    Thank you.

  6. #6
    Senior Member

    Re: Out of focus and Over exposure

    Out of focus and Over exposure
    Hi,
    Thank you so much for your response.

    1.Yes, the * shows up when I change the shutter and aperture.I set on Auto ISO to shoot. However, when I notice one or two of my photos are underexposure or overexposure, I tried to change ISO. I am posting more photos that are out of focus using P mode.

    Out of focus and Over exposure-dsc_1375.jpg

    Out of focus and Over exposure-dsc_1384.jpg

    Out of focus and Over exposure-dsc_1522.jpg

    Thank you!

  7. #7
    Senior Member

    Re: Out of focus and Over exposure

    Hi, nickt,

    Thank you so much for your handful tips. I have a follow-up question.There are three metering mode to choose from - 3D color/Center-weighted/Spot, would you suggest me set on center-weighted mode to take pictures to start out?

    Thank you!

  8. #8
    Senior Member

    Re: Out of focus and Over exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by wordlesstu View Post
    Hi, nickt,

    Thank you so much for your handful tips. I have a follow-up question.There are three metering mode to choose from - 3D color/Center-weighted/Spot, would you suggest me set on center-weighted mode to take pictures to start out?

    Thank you!
    3d color is the most general purpose mode, so I would use that. Use the other modes for more specific situations. Center weighted gives more consideration to the center of the frame. Spot is a spot. So most scenes, 3d is good. It will consider various elements. Center might be good for people with sky behind them. Spot could meter their shirt or a smaller area. Usually not what you want. I like spot for certain wildlife. Spot metering could help you with say a black cat or a white cat. Either situation would be tricky for the other modes to get detail in the fur. You get good metering on the spot at the cost of over or underexposing the rest of the scene so spot is not a good general purpose mode.
    I must have a really good camera.

  9. #9
    Senior Member

    Re: Out of focus and Over exposure

    Hi nikt,

    Thank you so much for your response. I have another follow-up question. Is there a rule of thumb for what to set on AF mode? I now set on Single-Area AF mode. Will you suggest me set on Dynamic-area AF with closest subject priority mode?

    Thank you.

  10. #10
    Senior Member

    Re: Out of focus and Over exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by wordlesstu View Post
    Hi nikt,

    Thank you so much for your response. I have another follow-up question. Is there a rule of thumb for what to set on AF mode? I now set on Single-Area AF mode. Will you suggest me set on Dynamic-area AF with closest subject priority mode?

    Thank you.
    I like single area. It really depends what you are doing and it best to understand how the modes work so you can choose the best. Single area is good, but the point must fall on the subject. In other words, the part of the scene under the focus point is what will be in focus.
    Two things to understand with focus. Focus mode and AF area mode.
    Focus mode is how the motor behaves, how it servos. Pick S or C. S focuses one time and stops, good for still subjects. C keeps focusing, good for moving subjects. Either of these modes can be set to to either release the shutter when you press the button or can be set to focus priority to insure focus is made before the shutter will be allowed to fire.
    AF Area is part two. This is how the camera finds the focus point. Best to download the user manual to see how these modes work to chose a focus point. Single Area of course is simple. The others not so simple. Once the focus point is found, that is when the Focus Mode S or C comes into play. The camera will either stop trying in S mode or it will keep tracking in C.
    S mode will let you focus, hold the shutter button half way and recompose the frame. Then fully push the shutter to take the picture. If using single area mode you could instead move the focus point of center if needed.
    For starters, I recommend Focus mode S, set to focus priority (A2 menu). Single area mode to start, but certainly try the more dynamic modes after you look at the user manual.
    There is no best focus setting, just understand what they do so you can pick the best. Probably good to stay with single area until you get comfortable. You will always be in control of the focus point that way. While in single area mode, try both S and C servo modes to see how they either focus once or track with the single point.
    Thanks/Like wordlesstu Thanks/liked this post
     
    I must have a really good camera.





Quick Reply Quick Reply

If you are already a member, please login above before posting.

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •